11 Innovative and Modern Schools Where Creativity and Good Design Rule

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By using innovative design to inspire learning and creativity, the following schools have certainly earned top marks—just in time for the new school year.

From an elementary school in Brooklyn with an edible garden and chicken coop, to plans for a storm-resistant high school in the Philippines inspired by the devastating effects of Typhoon Haiyan, these institutions prove how architects are collaborating with educators to create some very exciting opportunities. 

Studies have shown how color, lighting, and other classroom design choices can have an important impact on student progress, and these design-forward projects not only beautify spaces—creating a comfortable environment in which to learn—but they also tackle a variety of social and environmental issues.

Make sure to shop our back-to-school picks for kids, undergrads, graduate students, and more.

An Edible Learning Garden in Brooklyn

11 Innovative and Modern Schools Where Creativity and Good Design Rule - Photo 1 of 11 - Pioneering chef Alice Waters's Edible Schoolyard programs has now spread to all 50 states. This one at P.S. 216 in Brooklyn opened in December 2013. WORKac, the New York architectural office of Amale Andraos and Dan Wood, designed the glowing structure with raised beds, a greenhouse, chicken coop, cistern, and an indoor kitchen classroom. It even channels runoff rainwater from its roof for reuse in its mobile greenhouse. A glass enclosure (left) slides off the main structure in warmer months to open up to the garden, which contains 1,600 square feet of soil.

Pioneering chef Alice Waters's Edible Schoolyard programs has now spread to all 50 states. This one at P.S. 216 in Brooklyn opened in December 2013. WORKac, the New York architectural office of Amale Andraos and Dan Wood, designed the glowing structure with raised beds, a greenhouse, chicken coop, cistern, and an indoor kitchen classroom. It even channels runoff rainwater from its roof for reuse in its mobile greenhouse. A glass enclosure (left) slides off the main structure in warmer months to open up to the garden, which contains 1,600 square feet of soil.