293 Living Room Recessed Lighting Concrete Floors Design Photos And Ideas

Living, dining, and kitchen spaces flow into one another in the soaring great room. Here, the Sacramento firm placed new, polished concrete slabs over the original ones to alleviate unsightly cracks.
“Materials and details were chosen and developed for what they can offer: solar heat radiating from walls, natural ventilation to feel the breeze, timber posts you can lean against, and benches you can jump on,” said Welsch.
The home’s living room walls feature a mixed a custom color—a gallery white with a lime wash.
The sunken living room features a multifunctional piece of built-in furniture that integrates a sofa, sound system, and television, and also contains a "secret door" that leads to a wine cellar. "[We incorporated this] as a clin d’oeil to the midcentury tradition of built-in work stations and bookshelves," says Morales.
Taking cues from indoor/outdoor houses in Palm Springs, Ron sought to bring finishes from the outside in. The large brick fireplace in the living room is painted the same shade as the brick exterior, Sherwin-Williams Pure White.
The design team opened up the dining and living rooms by tearing down several walls. In place of the kitchen wall, a new structural beam runs the length of the living space.
The wife notes that the pattern on the concrete reminds her of a floor she once saw in Nepal.
A floor lamp nearly eight feet tall anchors the seating area in the living area. Ceilings that are 12 feet tall at the highest point help the room feel expansive. “We needed to find a way to define different areas in a relatively tight space,” Lachapelle says. It’s the clients’ first experience with an open floor plan. “We raised our kids in an old Victorian, and the farmhouse we live in now is chopped up into tiny rooms save for the studio we just added,” the husband says.
There are a variety of living areas, allowing the family to come together or inhabit different spaces. The den has a piano where the children can indulge in their passion for music.
The most costly parts of the build were the board-formed concrete walls and fireplace. “We believe it was worth spending the money here for a few reasons,” reveals architect Cavin Costello. “The mass anchors the house into the landscape, and the material is incredibly durable—something we need in the harsh desert sun. The board-forms give the home a wonderful character.”
The minimalist living space is furnished with a Jonas sofa and a midcentury Peter Hvidt and Orla Mølgaard-Nielsen coffee table produced for France & Son.
All-Weather 8000 Series double-glazed sliding doors frame views of the landscape and flood the interior with natural light.
The living space features glazed walls that look out over the garage and through the warehouse-style space toward the library. The couple’s collection of objets d’art are displayed on built-in shelves throughout the home, such as this one that wraps around a fireplace.
An eclectic collection of artwork, objects, and furniture adds warmth to the interior and evokes a real sense of the couple’s personalities. The layering of these objects over the industrial architecture creates a texturally rich interior that can be read as a tapestry of the couple's life together.
"We really wanted the rest of the house to be quiet in order to showcase the shipping containers as art objects," says Davis. "So, we used a very simple materials palette: lots of big windows and doors to bring in light and open up to the yards; heated concrete floors, polished to reveal the aggregate; basic IKEA cabinets; sheetrock painted a gallery-like white; and some touches of light, natural wood to add warmth and texture."
The bright orange front door opens into the circulation space between the existing home and the new addition. The family area sits at a slightly lower level, accessed via several long timber steps.
“Often the boys use the shipping containers in ways we hadn’t even imagined—like bravely climbing on top of the containers and jumping onto the big bean bags below,” says architect Paul Michael Davis. “It’s probably not advisable—a shipping container isn’t a jungle gym—but it’s thrilling to see a space used in ways you never expected!”
The guesthouse features a small lounge area in front of a bunk room and master bedroom. Paris Peak is visible in the distance through the side window.
The freestanding hearth serves multiple functions—it’s a fireplace, a privacy screen to the master bedroom, an entry closet, and an art piece. “The cantilevered structure is meticulously clad in raw industrial, hot-rolled steel sheets,” says architect Hunter Gundersen. “There is no glass, so the fire is open on all three sides. Like ballet, it looks easy and effortless, but in reality it’s a labor of painstaking love.” The gas burner and steel substructure was fabricated and installed by yNot construction, and the metal cladding artwork was crafted by Parker Cook Design.
The family is very creative—the artwork throughout the home was created by the client’s children, and his wife is a designer who selected and placed all the interior furnishings. The interior walls were left white to act as a gallery for the owners’ extensive art collection. In order to give the spaces warmth and coziness, the ceiling was clad in Atlantic white cedar from reSAWN Timber Co.
The entry to the home leads directly to the main living space. A 25-foot-wide, 11-foot-tall sliding glass wall opens to the central courtyard, allowing the living area to extend outside. Through this glazed door, the guesthouse and garage frame Paris Peak in the distance.
To the side of the guesthouse entrance are a pair of Pavilion lounge chairs by Anderssen & Voll for &Tradition and a Sintra stone table by Frama.
Instead of designing a completely open plan, Berg separated the public rooms with a freestanding fireplace wall made of Mutual Materials bricks in Coal Creek. An Emmy sectional by Egg Collective for Design Within Reach faces a Lars chair from Room & Board
“Windows on the walls, floors, and ceilings help to connect each room with the whole house,” add the architects.
Ash timber lines the walls of the second floor to lend a sense of warmth and visually separate the private areas from the communal spaces on the ground floor.
Next to the entrance is a flex room framed by two ash timber partition walls that can be used to host guests.
Pocketing glass doors on either side of the main living space can be completely opened for cross ventilation. The blue living room sofas are from Feathers Fine Custom Furnishings.
Slatted walnut walls are located on either side of the main living area. "We found in many modern homes with open floor plans that there is a really poor sound quality," explain the architects. "We wanted to design a solution that was not only aesthetically pleasing, but solved this issue—so both sides of the main living space have wood slat walls backed with acoustic felt."
"Playing the piano is a large part of their life, so we wanted to give it a great space to be played and to be heard," explain the architects. The piano area is located to one side of the open-plan living space.
The walls behind the fireplace are 400-millimeter-thick rammed earth, and they were formed on site by a specialist contractor. The material not only provides thermal mass to protect the interior from the heavy heat load experienced in summer, but also heats up when the fireplace is in use in winter months to provide gentle heat release to the main living area.
“There is something inherently playful about sitting on a deep window ledge with a book,” says architect Kirsten Johnstone. “Throughout the home, the juxtaposition of public versus private spaces and exposure versus protection is explored in different ways. In the lounge retreat, the large corner window abuts the hidden front entry door, and the stepped-down room means this bench seat is at the same level as the front entry decking. The external wall cladding wraps into the room, blurring the line between the inside and the outside and creating a delightful nook that is almost in the garden. It also provides an opportunity for engagement with neighbors and passers-by—a connection, a wave, a glimpse.”
The living room sits at the rear of the house, connected to the garden. "Even though it's a very small house, we wanted the living room to be very generous," says the couple. "This room is the life of the house."
“My mom really wanted a fireplace, even though they don’t make sense in Texas and generally are an energy drain—and she wanted it to somehow serve the living, kitchen, and dining spaces,” says architect Ryan Bollom. “So, we wound up using a clean-burning fireplace insert designed to fit in the transition that distinguishes each of the spaces without making them feel like different rooms.”
The living, kitchen, and outdoor porch areas in the primary residence are situated to enjoy sunset. The living room opens directly to the screened outdoor dining porch and a timber deck that overlooks the surrounding hills.
Timber has been used for both internal and external cladding, joinery, furniture, and door handles throughout the home. The entry nook features built-in display storage with brass detailing, which is echoed in the kitchen counter.
“We had a child and made a commitment to take care of my mother. We had to figure out a solution for housing us all with the right privacy and comfort,” says Ilga Paskovskis, owner of the Granny Pad.
Behind a facade of stained-black cedar, plywood walls and exposed rafters lend a casual, loft-like feel to the space, while strategically placed windows and skylights bring in ample day-light.
Throughout the home, floor-to-ceiling windows and doors frame views and allow for indoor/outdoor living.
The event center is illuminated by large skylights overhead. The space opens to an outdoor deck. The design is a mix of store-bought and vintage with kilim rugs and woven baskets hung as wall art "to add a cozy factor and texture to the concrete and wood space," says Morgan.
The family room couch is tucked into a nook to create a cozy retreat that still has views past the atrium to the backyard and kitchen.
The minimalist, light-filled interior was designed as the "humanization of the cave," say the architects.
“We wanted to tie the living room together with a freestanding midcentury-style fireplace, which was a design collaboration between our team and Malm Fireplaces” says designer Taylor Bode. “When all of the bi-fold doors are open, you can sit in a circle around the fireplace both indoors and outdoors. It’s an integral part of the design that brings warmth and light to the corner of the house.”
The communal dining table in the main house was custom-made by a local woodworker and island timber mill owner, Joe Romano, in collaboration with WindowCraft. Raw metal supports for the table were fabricated by Salish Metalworks on Orcas Island, a sister island to San Juan.
The den offers a second living area and features a sofa from Cassina and a classic Womb chair by Eero Saarinen for Knoll. The artwork is by local photographer Ashley Garmon.
The living room has a glazed corner and a window that looks into the entrance courtyard. The Shaya table lamps are by Canadian brand Neuvo.
A picture window over a custom concrete bench fashions a window seat. “Family, friends, and animals all enjoy the various places to relax in the lounge,” says the homeowner. “The window seat is universally the most prized nook in the home.”
An inset shelf is a decorative feature above the firewood storage. “We enjoy the low sun in the winter mornings and the toasty warmth from the Jotul stove, which heats the whole back of the house,” say the clients.
The Wilfred sofa from Jardan is covered in the homeowners’ other favorite color: indigo. It sits with a reupholstered Womb Chair in the new living area.
As elsewhere, the floors are concrete and the casework is crafted of reclaimed sinker cypress.
In the living room, Piero Lissoni’s sofa for Living Divani joins a Lawson coffee table by Egg Collective and poufs from CB2. The blanket and pillows are from Muji.
An imposing, matte black fireplace is the focal point of the living room. Wood is stored within the structure, which frees up floor space for abundant guest seating.
The common areas are furnished with cozy, lived-in furniture.
Part of Kao's solution was a three-story atrium, which features a Cor-Ten steel sculpture by local artist Melissa MacDonald. The floor lamp is by Frank Lloyd Wright.

The modern living room is one of the busiest spots in the house. It is where family and friends alike gather to share stories, watch movies, read, and unwind. As you'll find in the projects below, there are endless ways to configure a fresh living space with modern options for chairs and sofas, sectionals, end and coffee tables, bookcases, benches, and more. Innovative fireplaces add a touch of warmth.