97 Living Room Recessed Lighting Concrete Floors Chair Design Photos And Ideas

The apartment’s material palette—recycled wood, exposed concrete, terrazzo, and Japanese tatami mats—echo the colors seen outdoors, as well as textural memories from the country’s rural past.
Greene's golden retriever, Hudson, hanging out in the living room.
In the main living areas, the concrete slab floor was scored and given a coat of white resin.
From the open-plan living and dining area to the adjoining bedroom, the owner can enjoy spectacular views of the sea.
A non-load bearing window wall—a characteristic feature of Usonian houses—dominates the living room.
Massive glazing in the communal area frame views of a desert knoll to the north.
A view of the wine/fire lounge looking out toward the entry.
A cozy den with an original fireplace sits just off the kitchen. The fireplace, which appears in photographs taken by Shulman, originally had a two-story tall flue and was suspended from chains. Now, it sits securely on a stone platform and the flue ends at the first-floor ceiling.
Pocket-sliding glass doors offer seamless connection to the outdoors.
The screen helps to better ventilate the interiors. Shifting shadows cast patterns on the walls of the house as the western sun streams through the corridor.
Iron louvers have been used along the western facade to create a narrow corridor between the screen and exterior walls of the main volume.
Faced with a giant wall of glass, the new concrete extension houses an open-plan living area, dining room and kitchen.
The entertainment box includes built-in shelving and a television mount.
Feng Shui principles have informed the placement of the mirrored surfaces. In the living room, the mirrored panel has been placed so that the tenant can't see himself in the mirror when sitting on the sofa.
The living area has been carved out from the space between the yellow kitchen box and the wood-paneled entertainment box.
A large window at the end of the living space lets in ample natural light.
Upcountry Maui Cottage and Barn: living room
The space also allows for traditionally "outdoor" items, like a child's bicycle, to be stored or even used inside.
The view out to the garden.
A pink Wassily chair reworked by Anne Suttles, Noah Marion, and Austin Powder Coating.
A sofa from Conran Shop, and a vintage boucherouite rug from Pink Rug Co.
Wooden ceilings ground some of the home's more industrial features in its organic setting.
The two pavilions are fitted with large sliding glass doors, which open to two wooden decks. Here, views are oriented toward the peaceful natural landscape and sea beyond.
The couple snagged their Womb chair, a floor model, on sale.
The open-plan living room and dining area feature a cementitious floor covering, ERCO recessed LEDs, and EDL cabinetry laminates.
At the heart of the couple's redesign is the flexible guest room that can be adapted into a playroom, extra living space, or as another bedroom thanks to privacy curtains and two concealed built-in beds.
Rather than opting for the schematic, open-plan design of the renovated Queensland worker's cottage, the formalized living, sitting, and dining areas are compartmentalized; each room is dedicated to their function.
Across from the sofa, a concrete fireplace surround is topped with a custom walnut wall treatment.
Deep overhangs keep the harsh sun at bay.
In the main living areas, two vertical veils divide the high, inclined ceilings, and also serve as partitions for the kitchen, dining room, and living room without completely separating the volumes. The living room is also connected to an outdoor gazebo.
The use of wood softens the industrial feel of the concrete.
The minimalist material palette is picked up on the interiors as well, where a black concrete fireplace plays off the polished aggregate concrete floors.
The floor-to-ceiling windows in the living room give the impression of being outside even while cozily enjoying a cup of tea inside. All the windows in the house are double-paned and filled with argon gas. Petra Sattler-Smith says that “even when it’s 10 below you can put your hand on them and they are still warm.” Hydronic radiant heating embedded within the concrete floors not only enables barefoot walking during the coldest months but also warms the furniture and everything else in the room.
A floor-to-ceiling sliding door offers direct access to the patio and yard. A yellow custom-built reading nook packs a playful punch of bold color, and certainly brightens up the gray days that the Pacific Northwest is known for.
To create a clean and minimalist aesthetic, only treated pine plywood and concrete was used in the interiors.
From the dining table to the bed frames, custom plywood furniture is installed throughout the home and combined with a few nature-inspired touches, like the green Kvadrat wool felt in the upholstered built-ins.
Large windows, panelized with green muntins,  frame the corner of the addition, providing views to the grounds beyond.
Glass surfaces act as transparent room dividers throughout the home. Here, an open living area is divided by a ridged glass-and-steel-framed french window.
On the first floor, solid steel plates transform into a perforated metal spine, which cuts right through the building to the top floor.
The glass lenses of the circular pavement lights are a common feature on London streets.
The studio also created the sliding wooden doors that open into the master bedroom.
A long sofa in the center faces a coffee table topped with a slab of elm that was designed by Moss.
The open plan great room is bright and airy thanks to the insertion of the center courtyard .
The transformation is unrecognizable.
Large windows at the front of the home drawn in an abundance of natural light. Custom millwork frames the windows while also providing storage in the living room. Hues of pink and green splash between furnishings, textiles,  and plantings.
Full-height glazing and continuous material use allow spaces to flow freely from one to the other, and from inside to outside.
The furniture has been selected to complement the artwork around the duplex.
The front great room is intentionally public; the furniture-like wall (inspired by Mies’ Farnsworth house) creates privacy for all other rooms—even with no window coverings. No rooms have interior walls that connect with the outer perimeter of the house, echoing a design element of our 1958 E. Stewart Williams house in Palm Springs, CA.
An industrial style steel staircase gives the space a cool Manhattan warehouse look.
The home is a series of open and enclosed spaces with ample glazing to provide plenty of natural light.
A neutral palette for furniture keeps the interior feeling light and sun-drenched.
A handful of modernist classics—an Eames Lounge, a Bubble Lamp by George Nelson, and a shell armchair from Modernica—kit out the living room and kitchen.

The modern living room is one of the busiest spots in the house. It is where family and friends alike gather to share stories, watch movies, read, and unwind. As you'll find in the projects below, there are endless ways to configure a fresh living space with modern options for chairs and sofas, sectionals, end and coffee tables, bookcases, benches, and more. Innovative fireplaces add a touch of warmth.