263 Living Room Concrete Floors Pendant Lighting Design Photos And Ideas

Easy living was one of the homeowners' main goals, and thanks to the work of A. Gruppo, they now have a home they can be happy in for a long time to come.
"As far as our visitors go, most of them are really intrigued and impressed by the rotating television that separates the living area from the kitchen and allows us to watch wherever we are spending our time," says Lori. "This was one of those ideas that A. Gruppo just ran with and figured out after a brainstorming session one afternoon."
The home’s modest finish palette is accented with pops of color. The deep burgundy carpet in the entrance hallway is mirrored by the sofa in the living room and accented by rich blue side chairs.
To help create the illusion of more spaces, the great room features a vaulted ceiling and opens up to the outdoors with 12-foot wall-to-wall glazed sliding doors.
The soaring, timber-clad ceilings of the open-plan living, dining, and kitchen area follow the curve of the corrugated Zincalume roof, creating an impressive volume with views over the valley.
The backside of the dark-painted room for the music studio has shelving and display space for books and objects.
The wood-burning fireplace in the living room is vented through the warehouse’s sawtooth roof, sheathed in plywood above the living room.
"In architecture, we tend toward natural materials and raw metals. In furniture, we like color,
A porthole from the kitchen to the entrance—which makes reference to the seaside location—allows guests to be seen and welcomed as they arrive.
The mezzanine above the laundry will eventually be used as a study. The orange joinery beneath it functions as part of the entertainment unit and as storage for wine glasses.
Built with redwood, glass, red brick, and concrete, the house was originally designed by John Lautner for the Schaffer family, who used to spend time enjoying picnics under the resident oak trees. Lautner built the house horizontally around the oaks.
Krofchick describes the look as "Cali chic" with an infusion of ’70s spirit.
The Loft Box is on the top floor of an ’80s walk-up apartment. The removal of false ceilings allowed Cheok to insert an attic that overlooks the living and dining spaces.
A large, open living room seamlessly flows from the kitchen.
Set on a family cattle farm in a Western Australia coastal town on the Margaret River, Bush House, by Archterra founder Paul O'Reilly, marries a single-plane roof with a prefabricated steel frame support structure. A rammed-earth wall carries through O'Reilly's house into the outdoors, melding with oiled plywood, anodized aluminum, and recycled furniture.
designed by Estúdio Minke
An Italian architecture studio took advantage of an ideal setting for a getaway: rolling hills dotted with villages and castles in Italy's Oltre Po Pavese region. A young Milanese couple wanted a small vacation home on their 3000-square-meter lot there—and 35a Studio delivered, by way of this 120-square-meter cabin decked out in textural concrete and strategically accented with wood. While its exterior offers a smoother, stuccoed appearance, its interiors give way to a juxtaposition of two different concrete applications, opting for a rougher, board-formed treatment on the walls and a quartz paste polish on the floors. Wood accents, by way of the trimwork, doors, and cabinetry, provide rich, striking counterpoints.
When a couple approached Colorado-based Cottle Carr Yaw (CCY) Architects for a modern mountain retreat, they brought with them images of what would be the founding inspiration behind the new design—a simple and rugged cabin in Norway where the husband and his relatives had been gathering since the 1950s. Much like this ancestral Norwegian cabin, the new getaway is designed with the same rustic charms and deference to the landscape, as well as an inviting environment for friends and family to gather for generations to come.
It’s hard to believe, but this trendy stay was purchased by Kathrin and Brian Smirke at a tax auction for $7,000. While it sounds like a great deal, the 1957 property was abandoned—and it needed to be stripped to the studs and completely rebuilt. The DIY interiors now are teeming with photo opps—from stylish vignettes to an outdoor tub constructed from a water trough.
A 200-square-foot loft above the storage room overlooks the workspace.
On the recommendation of a close friend, the couple flew to Texas to meet the team behind the award-winning architecture firm Lake|Flato, whose Porch House program seemed to offer the perfection solution to the family’s quick-build needs.
The built-in sectional in the living space features extra storage underneath to maximize every inch of the home’s small footprint.
The chic contemporary interiors feature concrete floors and plywood paneling, with black accents that echo the cabin’s exterior.
The loft's original open floor plan, 13-foot-tall ceilings, and polished concrete floors remain. A modern, streamlined kitchen is now a central focal point.
Anchored with an ash accent wall with a built-in daybed, the midcentury-inspired living room features a Living Divani modular sofa and Tech Lighting pendant lamps. On the left is the custom double-sided bookshelf covered with acid-etched glass that divides the living space from the bedroom hall.
A board-formed concrete fireplace anchors the living room with a framed view of the lake.
The ceramic pendant above this cozy corner bench is by local studio Notary Ceramics; the wood table is by Vince Skelly.
The main living area is open and fluid. The polished concrete floors have radiant heating.
The kitchen, living room, and dining room are combined in a single, airy, great room.
The great room features a sound-dampening ceiling made of strips of Douglas fir laid over recycled denim insulation.
Natural light is filtered through the perforated, corrugated metal patio shade, creating changing patterns on the exposed aggregate concrete floors in the morning
What was once a poorly planned floor plan has transformed into open, brightly lit living spaces at the hub of the home.
The living room, located just steps away from the kitchen, offers ample seating. The leather couch, wood furniture, and polished concrete floors allow for easy cleaning.
Expansive windows and doors create a seamless indoor/outdoor connection.
The home’s heated floors are deep red, hexagonal tiles. It is said to be the earliest example of the architect’s experiments with this type of floor pattern.
The brick house has cypress paneling and woodwork throughout. The ceilings feature a unique chevron-like wood paneling. Clerestory windows provide additional light.
A contemporary Lindsey Adelman chandelier hangs elegantly in the living room, complementing the dark furnishings and sleek finishes.
The 5,870-square-foot home gracefully stretches in a linear fashion from the front to the back of the lot. It rests atop a concrete plinth—a response to the site's high water table.
Rockwell Group designed a flexible second-floor lobby with a co-working space and meeting rooms with transformable furniture, allowing them to double as lounges. “In a typical hotel, you can’t use a meeting room or other daytime spaces at night, and nightclubs sit empty during the day,” says Mitchell Hochberg, president of Lightstone Group. “We don’t have the option of doing that here.” Images of classical sculptures, warped by digital glitches, are in keeping with the tongue-in-cheek mood; miniature sculptures on the shelves cheekily take selfies or don leopard-print Speedos.
A mezzanine loft level provides extra floor space without increasing the home's footprint. Built-in bookshelves double as a guardrail for the lofted work space, accessed by a built-in ladder.
With generous height and vaulted ceilings, the two-bedroom home feels extremely spacious.
A gabled roof home in Werkhoven, a Dutch village in the province of Utrecht, takes the form of a modern barn with a twist—split down the middle from the peak, half of the exterior is floor-to-ceiling glass to take advantage of the views. "The transition from inside to outside, and vice versa, is always important in our designs," says architect Ruud Visser.
The living area has a wall of windows, the central two of which are operable. The orientation of the volume and the windows were specifically located to take advantage of the view.
On the other side of the globe, another hotel has mastered the open-air lobby. The Tierra Patagonia Hotel offers uninterrupted views of the Atacama Desert from the moment you first walk through the front door.
Great room with floor-to-ceiling windows.
Natural materials blend with contemporary furnishings in this unique, open living space.
"Freebooter is not just ‘a house to live in,’ but a home conceived to envelop and stimulate the senses of its owners," says Garziano. "We are designing for an age in which clients expect more from their homes."
Other custom Wright furnishings designed for the home and built for the first time include the upholstered ottomans and two coffee tables.
The team cleaned and restored all of the interior brickwork and replaced faulty insulated glass.
The chic interiors have a modern Scandinavian vibe.
Agora Fukuoka Hilltop Hotel & Spa in Fukuoka, Japan
Living, dining, and kitchen spaces flow into one another in the soaring great room. Here, the Sacramento firm placed new, polished concrete slabs over the original ones to alleviate unsightly cracks.
Vaulted ceilings and a built-in sofa turn the living room into a soothing sanctuary.

The modern living room is one of the busiest spots in the house. It is where family and friends alike gather to share stories, watch movies, read, and unwind. As you'll find in the projects below, there are endless ways to configure a fresh living space with modern options for chairs and sofas, sectionals, end and coffee tables, bookcases, benches, and more. Innovative fireplaces add a touch of warmth.