599 Living Room Pendant Lighting Design Photos And Ideas

Another original Eichler element which the homeowners have chosen to keep is the concrete masonry fireplace.
A built-in bench by the window is a cozy perch for Tyler. The herringbone flooring looks like wood but is actually man-made.
In order to open up the space, Klopf Architecture took out some walls that were supporting beams. Klopf explains, “We used a structural trick by putting a cross-beam on the roof, which you don’t see. The ceiling now has an open, more expansive feeling—more post-and-beam.”
The sofa in the living room is also by IKEA.
A look at the dining table by Habitat and colorful IKEA dining chairs.
The kitchen is layered with the living room—the counter space becomes the flooring in the living area, and steps are used as additional seating.
Inside, the open-plan layout features a kitchen which morphs into the living area with a raised built-in bench/reading nook, along with an upper level that overlooks the space.
The living and dining rooms were updated.
The firm’s founder and principal architect Sumiou Mizumoto stripped away the house’s side extension.
This classic Japanese room would receive a thoughtful renovation.
"We started by asking ourselves if it might be possible to design recreational cat furniture to fit well to architectural modernism or art museums," Neko writes on their website. The company is based in Japan and produces a limited run of 22 cat trees a year, fabricated from Japanese hardwood by craftspeople in Hida.
The residents furnished the interior themselves, even hand-picking the exposed reclaimed beams from a barn in Pennsylvania. The dining table and shelving unit are 1970s vintage and the sofa is from Design Within Reach (left). The height of the top level varies from around nine to 12 feet.
The use of wood softens the industrial feel of the concrete.
 A study area on the mezzanine level overlooks the kitchen. Extensive glazing gives the ground floor living spaces a direct visual link with the courtyard and terrace.
The open-plan living room, dining area, and kitchen are encompassed with bright vibes.
Throughout the design, the site was quickly revealed as a powerful element of the project. By choosing carefully the location and size of each window, external views were highlighted, and the atmosphere created by natural light is pleasant throughout the whole day. As for the position of the large sliding door, it was “ pushed “ toward the main interior open space with the intention of subtly separating the internal functions while creating a outside protected space. All these intentions ultimately aim to capture the essence of this project: the surrounding nature and wildlife.
Upon entering the home, guests come into a bright and airy, double-height great room. Part of the challenge for the design was to figure out how to make each space feel separate while making the entire home feel cohesive.
On one end of the top-floor communal space is a white volume that neatly contains the kitchen, pantry, and toilet.
Builder Ross Percival helped finesse the finely tuned detailing that separates the internal slope from the rock outside (opposite). The Pedro wire stool is by Craig Bond for Candywhistle.
The concrete bench in the living area just past the kitchen is built into the sloping wall. The Pedro wire stool is by Craig Bond for Candywhistle.
In the living area of Daniel Rozensztroch’s Paris apartment, an Eames La Chaise and a butterfly chair complement a Moroccan Berber rug.
In the living and dining area of Jean Risom's Block Island family retreat, mostly vintage Risom furnishings share space with a few new additions, the view facing north is framed by the wall of glass.

Photo by: Floto + Warner
The Kelleys furnished the cottage with help from Suzanne’s daughter Betsy Burbank of Betsy Burbank Interiors. Classic modernist icons, such as a Saarinen Womb chair for Knoll, a Herman Miller Eames lounge chair, and an Eileen Grey E1027 side table look at home alongside present-day pieces such as an Encore sofa (which handily folds down into a sleeping surface) from Room & Board and a Doka rug designed and produced by Stephanie Odegard. The Wohlert pendant lights from Louis Poulsen were designed by Vilhelm Wohlert in 1959, but grouped as such, they appear distinctly contemporary.
The living spaces are orientated to the north, while the bedrooms have been placed in the south of the home.
Cradle-to-cradle certified carpet from the Shaw Group adds a warm layer in the living room.
A sheltered patio provides the perfect place to sip wine and take in the views.
The ceiling throughout the main floor is exposed wood joists and plywood sheathing, all of which were painted white to provide texture and give more character to the room.
An upper mezzanine overlooks the great room. Full-height glazing provides views of the surrounding natural setting. The stone wall appears to seamlessly slide from inside to outside. A original, signed Isamu Noguchi paper lamp hangs above the stair.
Terrazzo tile floors with solid brass are featured throughout the open plan layout. The cork inserts between the ceiling's vaulted beams were inspired by home's original design.
Arbel’s projects—both products and architectural commissions—follow a chronological numbering system. The house itself is his 23rd design, while the one-of-a-kind glass pendants that accent nearly every room like a starscape are called “28.”
In the living room, guests gather on a matching ebony sofa and daybed from Hudson and a pair of Jorge Zalszupin lounge chairs. An Yves Klein coffee table—filled with the artist’s signature International Klein Blue pigment— provides a vivid burst amid otherwise organic tones. The walnut-and-bronze cabinetry is a custom design.
Davor and August check out the yard from the living room. “The bifold Vistalite doors allow us to open the house up completely and enjoy the fresh, warm air,” Davor says.
Masahiro and Mao Harada of Mount Fuji Architects Studio wanted to break with the traditional definition of a house when they designed this small Tokyo home. They achieved their goal by using the same material for the ceiling, the walls, and the floor, creating a space that flows beautifully. 

Photo by Ryota Atarashi.
Faulkner employed a strategic use of concrete, steel, wood, and glass to avoid “dating” the property.
A curved pink couch designed by Campagnola curves around a 1970s-style conversation pit in the living room.
Embroidered bedding accents, hand-woven blankets, and a handmade sisal rug add a touch of texture to the interior.
Architects Tim Ratliff and Tam Landells tripled the footprint of the four-room house and increased the square footage to almost 2,000. Blue doors that were part of the original rear wall connect the “snug,” or sitting room, to the new space. The chair was Natasha’s step-granddad’s; the 1960s pendant was found on eBay.
The master bedroom is illuminated in part by one of two hatched windows that Tanaka modeled after those he had seen in Japanese tea houses.
The Shinomotos have filled their Southern California home with furniture by Taku and pieces by some of the artists and craftspeople whose work they also showcase at their Tortoise shops and showroom. The couple worked with architectural designer Ken Tanaka to remodel the house, once a cramped, two-bedroom rental. A sofa and tables by Taku join Jasper Morrison’s Three Sofa De Luxe sofa for Cappellini. The sliders are by Western Window Systems.
The roundness of the house lends itself perfectly to an open, wallless floor plan.
A view from the second floor. Floor-to-ceiling windows keep the interiors bright and airy, while full height curtains provide protection from the heat of the sun.
The modules’ steel beams are painted Folkstone 6005 by Sherwin-Williams, while the walls are Decorator’s White by Benjamin Moore. Vitsœ shelving by Dieter Rams holds books and curios.
All furniture is made of oak wood except the staircase volume made entirely of black steel.
Ray sits at the central hearth on the north end of the comfortable sunken living area. From this perspective, you can see how the interior spaces flow into one another, passing one half-level up into the breakfast nook and kitchen and out from there onto the overgrown hillside. The various built-in furnishings have all been there since the house's construction.
The living spaces of house, built in 1972 or 1973, were originally divided into three—a kitchen, living and dining area, and an atrium (previous owners had covered the atrium with a roof). "The new owners wanted the interior space to flow as one, so we removed the glass doors and solid walls separating the enclosed atrium from the kitchen and living room," principal John Klopf says. "Some structural posts needed to remain to hold up the roof, but overall the space was opened up almost completely. The floor was leveled, and the plan freed up." The rainbow print is a 1960s Herman Miller trade poster, and the Vitamin Water print by a New York artist. A Sapien book tower from Design Within Reach sits next to the TV. The sofa is IKEA.
This iconic floor lamp from Serge Mouille alongside the Flow S4 Pendant, designed by Nao Tamura, inspired by the reflections of the Venetian cityscape, are both stylish standouts.
Since the original siding was in bad condition, they installed new vertical Western red cedar siding throughout the house, which is also reflected on both the interior and exterior. Klopf explained that one of the challenges of the project was finding a low-VOC stain that would match the color of the original siding.
The couple designed the master bedroom, choosing a new red carpet inspired by the original and a Half Moon pendant by Allied Maker.
For this 780-square-foot apartment Hong Kong apartment, local practice MNB Design Studio used plywood, smart storage solutions, and tapped into the principles of origami to create a highly structured, minimalist home.

The modern living room is one of the busiest spots in the house. It is where family and friends alike gather to share stories, watch movies, read, and unwind. As you'll find in the projects below, there are endless ways to configure a fresh living space with modern options for chairs and sofas, sectionals, end and coffee tables, bookcases, benches, and more. Innovative fireplaces add a touch of warmth.