256 Living Room Concrete Floors End Tables Design Photos And Ideas

The first-floor living room features a dramatic fireplace with a concrete surround and solid brass shelves that frame the wood storage and shelving.
The basement living room is smaller and more private, offering a dark space for watching movies as a family. Like the first-floor living room, the television is concealed by a timber screen. The artwork is by Columbian-born, Melbourne-based painter Julian Clavijo.
The lounge room on the first floor features Fly chairs in white oiled oak by SPACE Copenhagen for &Tradition, sourced from Great Dane Furniture, and a Bart swivel armchair by Moooi from Space Furniture.
The artwork in the first-floor living room is by contemporary figurative artist Kathrin Longhurst. Colorful pieces, such as the artwork and furniture, bring a sense of vibrancy into the otherwise minimal home.
The living room on the first floor is the main family gathering space. “It is the collection zone for togetherness, and offers an abundance of natural light and extended views out to the bay and beyond,” says architect Tony Vella.
During storm season, nature’s awe-inspiring light show is on full display through the oversized windows.
Designer Esther Bruzkus embraced bold color and texture in her Berlin apartment, leaving the window coverings to play a more subtle role.
The living room sits at the rear of the house, connected to the garden. "Even though it's a very small house, we wanted the living room to be very generous," says the couple. "This room is the life of the house."
The library/study space opens to the sunken courtyard on one side, and offers views through the living room to the water on the other side. “This transparency within the dwelling’s core provides an interconnectivity between these contrasting edges, allowing the clients to experience an ever-changing quality of lights and atmosphere,” says architect Fraser Mudge.
A Cheminees Philippe fireplace adds a rustic touch to the living space.
The clients enjoy boating and kayaking and often utilize the site’s direct water access. “There’s a boathouse at the bottom of the site, so we’ve tried to clean the view up,” says architect Fraser Mudge of the framing. “We also controlled the height of it a little bit to frame the beauty of the water and the National Park, rather than the sky.”
At the far end of the “living shed” is a fireplace and concrete bench, which offers a contemplative space for reading and watching the bushland through the windows.
Throughout the home, floor-to-ceiling windows and doors frame views and allow for indoor/outdoor living.
Eero Saarinen’s Womb chair is the star of the book-filled den.
This navy-blue velvet Ico Parisi–inspired Comma Sofa “evokes a water element, soft movement, and speaks to the history of the home,” says Masters.
Oak slats in the living room echo the timber slats that enclose the entry courtyard. The black-marble Empire side tables are by local furniture brand Seer Studio, and the white-marble Tulip table is by Eero Saarinen for Knoll.
Floating wood shelves accent the fireplace wall and link to the nearby kitchen.
Removing the partition wall makes it so the entire living space benefits from the natural light that comes through the floor-to-ceiling glass in the living room, increasing the sense of indoor-outdoor flow throughout. A sofa from Article is joined by art from Lynne Millar for Juniper Print Shop and a vintage credenza.
“The clients’ main priorities in their lives consisted of: their kids, their friends, their food,” says the firm. “We knew we had to knock down the wall that separated the kitchen from the living room to create one big, open space - this immediately created ease of flow.”
The Floyd sofa was chosen to jive with the family’s vintage painting, called the “Jazz Musician.”
The team kept one wall of paneling to accent the new space.
The rear garden, visible from this living court, includes a vegetable patch, fruit trees, and lawn for plenty of play area.
The timber screens outside can be rolled back and forth to control sun exposure, views, and privacy.
The glazed wall separating the apartment from the street was required, since the code otherwise requires the street front to be occupied by businesses.
In the living room, Piero Lissoni’s sofa for Living Divani joins a Lawson coffee table by Egg Collective and poufs from CB2. The blanket and pillows are from Muji.
The home’s modest finish palette is accented with pops of color. The deep burgundy carpet in the entrance hallway is mirrored by the sofa in the living room and accented by rich blue side chairs.
An abundance of south-facing windows connect the double-height living room to the outdoors.
The Oostwouders wanted a home that was low-maintenance yet sophisticated. The interior is filled with materials that match the contemporary Hill Country aesthetic of the exterior.
To help create the illusion of more spaces, the great room features a vaulted ceiling and opens up to the outdoors with 12-foot wall-to-wall glazed sliding doors.
Translucent louvers in the maple-clad walls and a skylight cross-ventilate the room with fresh air and bring in daylight.
The backside of the dark-painted room for the music studio has shelving and display space for books and objects.
The wood-burning fireplace in the living room is vented through the warehouse’s sawtooth roof, sheathed in plywood above the living room.
David Liddicoat and Sophie Goldhill, the couple behind architecture practice Liddicoat & Goldhill, built their four-story, asymmetrical home topped with a steeply slanted roof on a narrow, irregularly shaped site within London's Victoria Park neighbourhood. It flaunts ample glazing and a mix of textures like exposed brickwork, stainless steel, and Rhodesian mahogany.
Maria Milans del Bosch’s Catskills home is attuned to the changing seasons. Sunlight pours into the double-height living room, where a Stûv fireplace and radiant floors keep the space warm in winter.
Floor-to-ceiling glass runs along the entire front facade, providing expansive views of lush forests and the Mediterranean Sea in the distance. Polished concrete and natural wood dominate the minimalist aesthetic.
Jimmy Brower and Damien Merino are a creative couple with an entrepreneurial mindset—and they created a sun-soaked sanctuary on the Oakland/Emeryville border that’s characterized by lush plant life, quiet nooks, and handmade art and decor.
Douglas fir beams, some of which were salvaged from the original home that sat on the property, run in perpendicular lines overhead. Certain sections of the ceiling are exposed, while others are covered in drywall. For flooring, the residents, who have two young children, selected durable polished concrete. The Sven Charme sofa is by Article and the teak bureau is vintage.
A view down from the loft into the expansive space. Rafters and joists frame the pitched roof, while built-in cabinetry runs down both sides of the open living and dining room.
An Italian architecture studio took advantage of an ideal setting for a getaway: rolling hills dotted with villages and castles in Italy's Oltre Po Pavese region. A young Milanese couple wanted a small vacation home on their 3000-square-meter lot there—and 35a Studio delivered, by way of this 120-square-meter cabin decked out in textural concrete and strategically accented with wood. While its exterior offers a smoother, stuccoed appearance, its interiors give way to a juxtaposition of two different concrete applications, opting for a rougher, board-formed treatment on the walls and a quartz paste polish on the floors. Wood accents, by way of the trimwork, doors, and cabinetry, provide rich, striking counterpoints.
It’s hard to believe, but this trendy stay was purchased by Kathrin and Brian Smirke at a tax auction for $7,000. While it sounds like a great deal, the 1957 property was abandoned—and it needed to be stripped to the studs and completely rebuilt. The DIY interiors now are teeming with photo opps—from stylish vignettes to an outdoor tub constructed from a water trough.
When glass dominates a home, the result is a borderless residence that syncs with its environs, creating a stunning, new visual and psychological sense of space. See how these glass homes use the versatile material to create ambiance and connect with the outdoors.
The carpeting was removed to reveal the concrete slab underneath, which was finished with epoxy paint. “That room just beckoned to be an entertainer’s paradise,” says Wei.
Wei covered the bar in plywood cut in diagonal strips, alternating four different stains to create color variation. The coffered ceiling received Azurite in Beige/Gold from the Albany Misuto Wallpaper Collection.
Another view of the living room, which is separated from the home office by a narrow light well and conservatory like space. Trees and other plantings provide a natural division between the two rooms.
The study has a fold-down bed for extra guests. “We knew that we wanted a space that was open and inviting, and that would suit our wishes to spend relaxation time together, as well as with cherished house guests,” say the homeowners.
The open-plan living area has concrete floors and Douglas fir accents.
The loft's original open floor plan, 13-foot-tall ceilings, and polished concrete floors remain. A modern, streamlined kitchen is now a central focal point.
The clients asked for high ceilings; these are four meters high (approximately 13.1 feet).
In a corner of the living room, where concrete floors provide a minimalist aesthetic, a trio of pendants designed by Frederik Roije suspend near a Gispen 412 armchair and a glass side table, also designed by Frederik Roije.
A more narrow window focuses the eye on tree trunks, creating an “abstracted view of the landscape,” says the firm.
With concrete floors and pine construction, the minimalist home is designed to keep focus on the outdoors. Here in the square-shaped family room are the open-plan kitchen, dining area, and living room.
The living room is the meeting point between old and new, marked by the ornate Victorian detail at the threshold.
The family room across from the open bedroom features a Nelson Bubble Globe pendant, IKEA Alseda floor stools, and an heirloom tapestry wall hanging.
On the home’s lower level, an open bedroom area includes a Sierra chair by Croft House and a Nelson Bubble Cigar pendant by George Nelson for Herman Miller.
Built in 1963 by architects Buff & Hensman, the Roth Residence was originally commissioned by the grandparents of L.A. City Mayor Eric Garcetti. In 2006, the home was restored and expanded with post-and-beam construction, sweeping glass walls, midcentury flair, and indoor/outdoor living areas.
Strategically placed windows allow ample natural light to illuminate the single-story interior.
Linda Hutchins and John Montague hired Works Partnership Architecture to turn a former Portland, Oregon, warehouse and auto repair shop into a versatile live/work space.

The modern living room is one of the busiest spots in the house. It is where family and friends alike gather to share stories, watch movies, read, and unwind. As you'll find in the projects below, there are endless ways to configure a fresh living space with modern options for chairs and sofas, sectionals, end and coffee tables, bookcases, benches, and more. Innovative fireplaces add a touch of warmth.