66 Exterior Metal Siding Material House Mid Century Design Photos And Ideas

The trapezoid-shaped addition hosts a new master suite on the main level.
The team preserved the deck, but installed a new railing.
Built in 1952, this home was designed by architect Albert P. Martin as his own residence after having apprenticed with Richard Neutra. Martin set the home atop challenging hillside terrain and took full advantage of the site's sweeping reservoir views with floor-to-ceiling glass and outdoor patios. When the three-bedroom, three-bathroom home hit the market in 2014, actress Kristen Wiig snapped up the property for $1.7 million and tapped Taalman Architecture and The Archers for a thorough renovation. The design team preserved the original elements of the home for authenticity while upgrading the facilities to meet modern needs.
When Wexler and Harrison’s steel homes first hit the market in 1962, they were competitively priced between $13,000 and $17,000. Shown above is Steel House #2.
Wexler and Harrison's original plan was to create affordable vacation homes for a growing middle class. When this home first went on the market with the others in 1962, it was competitively priced between $13,000 and $17,000. Today, the kitchen has been restored following guidelines from its original configuration, and the landscaping was updated in 2001 with Wexler's oversight.
A deck just off the living space overlooks the pool and provides a comfortable shaded area to enjoy the outdoors.
The L-shaped home wraps around the pool deck, which features extensive, lush landscaping.
“Most homeowners would tear the whole thing down and start fresh,” says Brillhart. “But it made for a much more interesting project, preserving a little bit of Russell’s legacy and then adding two new wings on each side of the building.” An Ipe fence now lines the front of the property, and the two-story wing can be just glimpsed through the trees on the left.
246 East 58th Street was designed by Paul Rudolph in 1989 and is the only residence designed by Rudolph that is currently open to the public.
Designed by Arthur Witthoefft of Skidmore, Owings & Merrill in 1961, this five-bedroom, five-bathroom midcentury house is set in the woods of Armonk, New York. The 5,000-square-foot home features full-height walls of glass, a wraparound floating terrace, and a quiet deck that overlooks the site's sylvan surroundings.
The Eames House, also known as Case Study House #8, is on Chautauqua Drive in the Pacific Palisades area of Los Angeles, California.
Manitoga, or Dragon Rock, was the residence of industrial designer Russel Wright and is filled with design details that incorporated nature, including rooms with boulders rising from the floors and a tiered layout that worked with the natural topography.
Fresh, bright, and cheery, the updated architecturally significant residence complements the couple’s modern lifestyle.
Wexler thought steel was a good material for desert building. He told the Los Angeles Times: “With steel you get clean, sharp lines that will look good forever. Nothing can destroy it. Nothing can affect it.”
A small sitting patio just outside the kitchen door.
The home is located in the Movie Colony East neighborhood, on land that was once part of the Frank Sinatra estate before it was subdivided.
One of the most significant of Mies' works, the Farnsworth House in Plano, Illinois, was built between 1945 and 1951 for Dr. Edith Farnsworth as a weekend retreat. The home embraces his concept of a strong connection between structure and nature, and may be the fullest expression of his modernist ideals.
A long bluestone roof deck overlooks the pool and the expansive lawn.
The midcentury modern home is located on 1.7 acres of land and features bluestone terraces, fieldstone walls, and elevated views of the countryside.
In the entrance, a team with the general contracting firm Martha uncovered an abstract mural that Engels painted himself and then plastered over. He also made the geometric door handle. Simon speculates that Engels sourced the marble, found all over the house, from Expo ’58, after the pavilions had been dismantled.
Villa Engels, the home of the esteemed Belgian modernist Lucien Engels (1928–2016), was falling apart when its second owners bought it in 2013. Yet due to its heritage status, any changes they planned would have to be approved by the provincial preservation office. Engels completed the elongated, cantilevered residence in 1958, the same year he finalized the master plan for Expo ’58, the Brussels World’s Fair that famously featured the Atomium.
The Palm Springs Modern Committee relocated and reconstructed a full-scale replica of architect Paul Rudolph's 1952 Walker Guest House. It's currently on loan from the Sarasota Architectural Foundation.
"The main forms were wrapped in stainless steel to reflect the landscape and create a colorful, shimmering, envelope," explain the architects on their website.
The home is surrounded by extensive gardens and mature trees.
To the front, the gardens are laid around a central lawn with a circling driveway which provides parking. There is also a garage for family cars.
The private estate is located off a country road just over one mile from the historic town center of Godalming, England.
The sprawling property has a strong connection to the outdoors.
The home at dusk.
The deceptively simple design makes it a well-recognized masterpiece of midcentury design.
Nestled into its Laurel Canyon location, the home overlooks a shallow rectangular pool.
A view of the home at night.
Lake/Front view showing living room windows surround.
An exterior view of the property.
Writer Marc Kristal described the house as "a lapidary example of Miesian simplicity: a 25-by-95-foot rectangle, composed of a black exposed-steel frame, front and northern elevations clad largely in white glazed brick, and southern and western exposures enclosed by floor-to-ceiling glass sliders."
A look at the backside of the home.
The home and its distinctive California casual elegance been featured in design and architecture books.
The front of the house restored and adapted
This home is iconic of Sugden’s work in Utah, and is a direct expression of both the Modernist movement and the Bauhaus school.
Like all of Sugden’s work, the building frame is entirely made of A36 steel that is joined exclusively with moment-resisting welded connections, and rests on an exposed, reinforced concrete foundation.
The decidedly nontraditional structure includes a front wall that opens the living room onto the front yard—and to the rest of the neighborhood, which has enthusiastically welcomed the house and its owner.
This shows how the new sitting room easily links to the brick terrace, which has a wraparound built-in bench.
The bay window as seen from the exterior. "We think that this gesture of the canting window, breaks with the figure of the house, in the manner that a small child does when peeking from behind the legs of a parent," write the architects. "We have worked in close attentiveness to the needs of our clients and sought to offer them a humble, liveable, and affordable adaptation of Emery’s original architecture."
Wexler and Harrison's original plan was to create affordable vacation homes for a growing middle class. When this home first went on the market with the others in 1962, it was competitively priced between $13,000 and $17,000.
Clerestory windows add to the clean, modernist vibe.
The wraparound deck provides stellar views and is perfect for entertaining.
“It was great to work from the plans of someone who was a part of the history of architecture,” says Drapszo.
On the exterior, Eva chose to cover the existing yellow brick with Prodema wood paneling installed by GFS Architectural Systems, Inc

Zoom out for a look at the modern exterior. From your dream house, to cozy cabins, to loft-like apartments, to repurposed shipping containers, these stellar projects promise something for everyone. Explore a variety of building types with metal roofs, wood siding, gables, and everything in between.