This Michigan Couple Found Out They Own the Last Standing Home by Alexander Girard

Add to
Like
Share
By Deborah Lubera Kawsky / Photos by Brian W. Ferry
The last of a little-known, thought-to-be-extinct breed—a midcentury modern house by Alexander Girard—is discovered near Detroit.

Rob and Mary Lubera sensed something special from the listing for the single-story, post-and-beam structure in Grosse Pointe Farms, Michigan, but they weren’t sure what. It was 2009, and Rob, an estate planning attorney, and Mary, a CPA, had spent more than two years looking for a new home in the affluent Detroit suburb. On a whim, they asked their realtor to add the property to their list, consisting otherwise of historic-style houses.

Newsletter
Join the Daily Dose Mailing List

Get carefully curated content filled with inspiring homes from around the world, innovative new products, and the best in modern design

When Rob and Mary Lubera started pulling threads to uncover the origins of their new home—the lone midcentury house amid rows of Tudor Revivals in suburban Detroit—not even architecture scholars could have anticipated what they would find. Theirs is the last surviving residence by Alexander Girard (1907–1993), a modernist visionary who made his name in textiles but tried his hand at virtually everything, architecture included. The shoji-like laminate screens, seen in the entryway, are characteristic of his Japanese-influenced work. 

When Rob and Mary Lubera started pulling threads to uncover the origins of their new home—the lone midcentury house amid rows of Tudor Revivals in suburban Detroit—not even architecture scholars could have anticipated what they would find. Theirs is the last surviving residence by Alexander Girard (1907–1993), a modernist visionary who made his name in textiles but tried his hand at virtually everything, architecture included. The shoji-like laminate screens, seen in the entryway, are characteristic of his Japanese-influenced work. 

The distressed condition of the exterior suggested that it had been vacant for some time. As the realtor opened the door, he said confidently, "This will only take a few minutes." But the Luberas were captivated by what they saw: an open layout, exposed steel joists, a giant hearth, Japanese-style doors, boldly colored glazed-brick walls, and, most striking of all, windows that stretched from floor to ceiling.

The Alexander Girard house centers on a courtyard, complete with slate pavers, a dogwood tree, and rock gardens.

The Alexander Girard house centers on a courtyard, complete with slate pavers, a dogwood tree, and rock gardens.

"The natural light was incredible," Rob recalls. After the tour, the realtor asked the couple what they thought. To his surprise, they replied in unison, "I love it."

Vines spill over primary-colored, glazed-brick walls, which recall Girard’s eye-popping graphics.

Vines spill over primary-colored, glazed-brick walls, which recall Girard’s eye-popping graphics.

Even before they closed, the Luberas started looking into the home’s history. The blueprints revealed that it had been built in 1950 for banking magnate John McLucas and his wife, Kathleen, and designed by one Alexander Girard. The name meant nothing to the couple, until they looked it up on Google.

The brick walls extend indoors, where Girard used a hearth to organize the living area, presaging his and Eero Saarinen’s revolutionary concept for the conversation pit at the Miller House.

The brick walls extend indoors, where Girard used a hearth to organize the living area, presaging his and Eero Saarinen’s revolutionary concept for the conversation pit at the Miller House.

Hundreds of hits suddenly plunged them into the world of one of America’s most prolific interior, furniture, and textile designers. Girard, they discovered, was the New York–born, Italy-raised multihyphenate who had been recruited by Charles Eames to head Herman Miller’s textile division from 1952 to 1973, leading the firm away from the dour fabrics of wartime toward the lively colors and patterns of the Space Age.

The Luberas didn’t use a general contractor or architect, but they did enlist the counsel of legendary Detroit designer Ruth Adler Schnee, who in 1964 helped Girard plan <br>the color scheme for a streetscape in Columbus, Indiana.  Window alignments create long views through the house and atrium.

The Luberas didn’t use a general contractor or architect, but they did enlist the counsel of legendary Detroit designer Ruth Adler Schnee, who in 1964 helped Girard plan
the color scheme for a streetscape in Columbus, Indiana. Window alignments create long views through the house and atrium.

Having moved to Detroit in 1937 after a five-year stint with his first practice in New York, Girard made a name for himself in Michigan and beyond when he curated the landmark "An Exhibition for Modern Living" at the Detroit Institute of Arts in 1949. Across 10 weeks, nearly 150,000 visitors were exposed to radical new designs by Florence Knoll, Jens Risom, the Eameses, Isamu Noguchi, and others.

The sofa and side table are from West Elm. The pillow is adorned with a stylized sun that Girard created for the New York restaurant La Fonda del Sol.&nbsp;

The sofa and side table are from West Elm. The pillow is adorned with a stylized sun that Girard created for the New York restaurant La Fonda del Sol. 

The Luberas also learned that Girard had studied architecture in London and, between 1947 and 1951, had designed several houses, including for himself, near Detroit, all of which were later torn down. Bit by bit they realized that the McLucas House was the last surviving residence anywhere that was designed entirely by Girard.

New stone walkways, laid in a swirling pattern, surround the 4,600-square-foot house.

New stone walkways, laid in a swirling pattern, surround the 4,600-square-foot house.

Bit by bit they realized that the McLucas House was the last surviving residence anywhere that was designed entirely by Girard. 

&nbsp;In the dining room, the sliding-panel cedar cabinets feature a glass display case reminiscent <br>of the tokonoma found in traditional Japanese architecture, to which Girard professed a "profound debt." In the kitchen, original pale orange Formica counters were replaced with crisp white ones.&nbsp;

 In the dining room, the sliding-panel cedar cabinets feature a glass display case reminiscent
of the tokonoma found in traditional Japanese architecture, to which Girard professed a "profound debt." In the kitchen, original pale orange Formica counters were replaced with crisp white ones. 

Yet hardly anyone knew of it—not the Detroit Institute of Arts, not the Michigan State Historic Preservation Office, not even Girard’s family. As Rob puts it: "The people who knew Girard was the architect didn’t know who he was, and the people who knew about Girard didn’t know he was the architect."

In the living room, the slanted, open-joist ceiling rises to almost 10 ½ feet. A fusuma door leads <br>to the dining room. The torso sculptures are by Janice Trimpe.&nbsp;&nbsp;

In the living room, the slanted, open-joist ceiling rises to almost 10 ½ feet. A fusuma door leads
to the dining room. The torso sculptures are by Janice Trimpe.  

The couple were stunned. "We had no experience with modern design," Rob says. But their immersion led to appreciation, and they committed to returning the house to its original state. They were aided in their quest by a larger resurgence in interest in Girard, including a 2011 monograph by designer Todd Oldham and a 2013 "Michigan Modern" symposium at the Cranbrook Art Museum.

Shop the Look
Eames Walnut Stool
Eames Walnut Stool
Ray Eames drew on her training as a sculptor to design a new kind of occasional piece for the lobby of the Time-Life Building in New York City. Eames Walnut Stools became her favorite seats and were liberally scattered about the Charles and Ray Eames home in Pacific Palisades.
Alexander Girard: A Designer's Universe
Alexander Girard: A Designer's Universe
Alexander Girard was one of the most important modern textile artists and interior designers of the 20th century. He combined Pop and Folk art influences to create a colorfully opulent aesthetic language whose impact continues to be felt today.
Eames Lounge Chair and Ottoman
Eames Lounge Chair and Ottoman
It’s no surprise that Charles and Ray Eames spent much of their careers investigating molded plywood—but when they introduced their lounge chair and ottoman in 1956, they immediately made history.
In the master bathroom and dressing room, pink-and-white floor tiles were found hidden under ’70s shag carpeting.&nbsp;

In the master bathroom and dressing room, pink-and-white floor tiles were found hidden under ’70s shag carpeting. 

As word of the home’s existence got out, famed Knoll textile designer and former Girard collaborator Ruth Adler Schnee, then in her early 90s, came onboard as the Luberas’ consultant, using McLucas family photos, original drawings found in the Vitra Design Museum, and her years of experience as her guide. Rob remembers thinking, "Who better to restore a Girard residence than someone who worked with him?"

A custom duvet in a Girard pattern covers the master bed; the sconce is original.

A custom duvet in a Girard pattern covers the master bed; the sconce is original.

Luckily, major reconstruction wasn’t necessary. But the facade, made up of rectangular bays of plywood and glass framed in wood, had seen better days. "All of the nearly eighty posts had been painted black," Rob recalls. "Each one had to be sanded by hand to reveal the cedar finish."

This Michigan Couple Found Out They Own the Last Standing Home by Alexander Girard - Photo 12 of 19 -

A floating wood-screen wall leads to a fuchsia front door and appears to punch through the envelope, continuing for several feet into the vestibule. The living room is flanked by an L-shaped hearth on one side and the dining room on the other. Here, the feeling of openness is overpowering, with a ceiling that rises toward a wall of windows facing an open-air atrium.

This Michigan Couple Found Out They Own the Last Standing Home by Alexander Girard - Photo 13 of 19 -
This Michigan Couple Found Out They Own the Last Standing Home by Alexander Girard - Photo 14 of 19 -

"The people who knew Girard was the architect didn’t know who he was, and the people who knew about Girard didn’t know he was the architect." Rob Lubera, resident 

This Michigan Couple Found Out They Own the Last Standing Home by Alexander Girard - Photo 15 of 19 -

Mary describes the atrium as an "interior landscape, an oasis from the sights and sounds of the outside world." It’s also the only place where the home’s red, yellow, and blue brick accent walls converge. The type of glazed-ceramic masonry Girard used was developed specifically for Eero Saarinen’s General Motors Technical Center and made by Claycraft, and in 1950, it was not yet commercially available. The owners theorize that he got early access to the material through his role as color consultant on the project, then being built.

This Michigan Couple Found Out They Own the Last Standing Home by Alexander Girard - Photo 16 of 19 -

Across the atrium, in the master suite, another piece of history was uncovered when Schnee had the carpet torn up and found a floor of pink-and-white harlequin-patterned tiles. The discovery—another illustration of Girard’s gift for color and detail—was a high point of the project, which included replacing counters and appliances and recently came to a close.

This Michigan Couple Found Out They Own the Last Standing Home by Alexander Girard - Photo 17 of 19 -

But the wider mission of sharing and safeguarding Girard’s legacy never ends. The McLucas House has become a beacon for midcentury experts, from the head of the Vitra Design Museum to the scions of the Eames family, many of whom have attended the Luberas’ annual black-tie art party to run their hands along the uneven bricks or inhale the scent of the freshly sanded cedar. 

This Michigan Couple Found Out They Own the Last Standing Home by Alexander Girard - Photo 18 of 19 -

As Rob says: "On most days we feel like curators, not owners. No one person can own something like this." 

Deborah Lubera Kawsky is the author of Alexander Girard Architect (A Painted Turtle Book, 2018).

Alexander Girard, Architect
Alexander Girard, Architect
During the midcentury period, Michigan attracted visionary architects, designers, and theorists, including Alexander Girard.
McLucas House / Girard House floor plan

McLucas House / Girard House floor plan

To see another incredible midcentury renovation, check out the prefabricated Frost House in Michigan City, Indiana.