240 Living Room Coffee Tables Bookcase Design Photos And Ideas

The classic post-and-beam style defines the home's interior. Exposed wood ceilings and lightly colored hardwood floors run throughout the open concept living area.
The interiors are compact and feature abundant, built-in storage. This room faces out onto the spa that anchors the swimming pool on the north side of the home.
The apartment is accessed via an old freight elevator. The cabinetry around the elevator entrance—including a massive bookshelf and storage space—is black, contrasting with the white brick walls and the white oak joinery.
London–based Steyn Studio designed a three-bedroom home on the outskirts of Madrid, Spain, that stands out from its neighbors with a striking sawtooth roof. The project, nicknamed the Sierra House for both its peaked profile and its location in one of Madrid’s northwestern neighborhoods between Mirasierra and Montecarmelo, features furniture and window treatments that complement the neutral tones of the exterior and interior materials. Textured walls of board-formed concrete provide visual interest in the living room.
The curvy shape of this pink sofa gives it a fun, playful quality.
On the opposite side of the entry hall is the living room. A double fronted log burner sits within the stone chimney at the center of the space.
What was once the industrial loft of a knitting mill is now a modern canvas for a collection of some 300 pieces of art. One can find pieces from Alexander Calder, Dan Flavin, John McCracken, Gary Hume, Francis Picabia, and more covering this renovated loft by Fiedler Marciano Architecture in conjunction with the art-loving husband-and-wife team that own the home. While the collection informed many of the elements, the space is a fusing, or conversation, rather, between the art, architecture, and design. The owners wanted a home, not a gallery.
One of the home's many stunning features is its cathedral-like living area with exposed redwood beams rising over 20 feet. A large red-brick fireplace enhances the room's regal aesthetic.
The home’s main living area features cathedral ceilings and a large loft overhead. The space is divided by a stone fireplace and built-ins that lead to the kitchen.
The four-bed, four-bath home of Peter and Sarah Diamond and their two adult children is uniquely situated in one of the most remote areas of the Berkshires: Mount Washington, Massachusetts.
At no more than $25 a pop, these affordable goodies are downright perfect for everyone you know.
The ground floor features Douglas fir flooring. The living room at the front of the house is separated from the entrance hallway by a black steel-framed glazed partition.
A Regency wood-burning stove provides heating to the living space. The floors are tumbled Bluestone tiles.
Anchored with an ash accent wall with a built-in daybed, the midcentury-inspired living room features a Living Divani modular sofa and Tech Lighting pendant lamps. On the left is the custom double-sided bookshelf covered with acid-etched glass that divides the living space from the bedroom hall.
A look at the spacious family room, which features additional built-ins, wooden beams and paneling, as well as clerestory windows that invite long rays of natural light into the space.
Smartly tucked underneath the stairs is a full bath.
The firm raised the height and increased the width of the new opening between the kitchen and dining room.
The space after renovations, with cantilevering cabinetry along the perimeter to preserve and protect Hall's original radiant heating vents in the windowsills—an example of his innovative solutions for meeting the space's functional needs.
The bright pink and leopard print furnishings are reminiscent of Betsey's clothing line.
On one side of the house, a white central staircase leads to a split-level landing the Robertsons call "the reading room." "We needed a place to hang out and for the kids to read," explains owner Vivi Nguyen-Robertson. Awaiting the birth of the couple's son, she relaxes in a built-in reading nook in the library.
Ed Parker and his wife, Barbara Tutino Parker, use the TV room cabinet to store their overflowing book collection. Though not a library per se, it serves as such for the Brooklyn brownstone.
The sliding doors on both sides allow the house to be entirely open to tropical breezes. Floor-to-ceiling glass also offers expansive views of the landscape and beyond.
Another view of the living room and the sliding glass doors that open to the porch. In total, the home features 100 feet of glass spanning the full with of the front and rear facades.
A bookcase was built along the 30-foot long anchor wall in the large living space. The shelves are inset several inches away from the glass walls on either side, intended to create a floating effect that mirrors the way the house itself floats above the ground.
A view looking from the kitchen to the open family room, which is outfitted with sofas by Perez Furniture. Above, interior windows in the upstairs bedrooms look out onto the double-height dining area and a view out of the giant window wall.
The sunken living room features many custom-made pieces, including the patterned chairs and large sofa. "We work with companies that we've had relationships with for many years," Simon says. The side tables are Noir, lamps are from Arteriors, while the cocktail table is from 1stDibs. "We wanted the look to be affordable but accessible and paired with vintage pieces," she says. "You want it to come together without looking like a West Elm Showroom and you run into issues when you buy things all from retail stores, so that's why you should pick pieces that fit the personality of the home."
A skylight brings additional natural light into the open-plan living space. The gray, combed basalt fireplace figures prominently, as does built-in wood cabinetry.
CH25 chairs by Carl Hansen, a Flexform sofa, and a Gan rug outfit the cozy, uncluttered living room.
Another view of the living room. Glimmering metal finishes, polished stone, and jewel-colored furnishings contrast with the heft of the granite blocks that anchor the house.
Front entry and living area.
Adding in live-edge details via countertops, freestanding furniture pieces, or built-in shelves is something that O’Donnell enjoys. "It’s fun to come up with uses for funky live edges and incorporate that into the design and still make it functional," he says.
Francis Mill emphasizes the importance of "uninterrupted looking" at home. This niche in the cave offers a tranquil place to read or contemplate art.
Morten Bo Jensen, the chief designer at Vipp—whose headquarters are located in Islands Brygge—and his partner, graphic designer Kristina May Olsen, bought a loft space in the former Viking pencil factory in 2011. They bought the loft from its previous owner, one of five investors who purchased the circa-1910 factory building, roughly a decade ago, in a very raw state.
As the only handicap-accessible building designed by Frank Lloyd Wright, the Kenneth and Phyllis Laurent House (so named for the couple that lived there from 1952 until 2012) was completed in 1952 as one of the so-called Usonian homes. The couple married shortly before World War II, and Ken Laurent underwent surgery during his service in the Navy that left him paralyzed from the waist down. Wright listened closely to his clients' needs to create an accessible design that was decades ahead of his time, including thresholds and floors that are level with the exterior ground for easy transitions between inside and outside. Wright designed much of the furniture in the house.
In the kitchen, light-colored, ash-veneer custom cabinetry is balanced with charcoal Silestone quartz counters.
Rockwell Group designed a flexible second-floor lobby with a co-working space and meeting rooms with transformable furniture, allowing them to double as lounges. “In a typical hotel, you can’t use a meeting room or other daytime spaces at night, and nightclubs sit empty during the day,” says Mitchell Hochberg, president of Lightstone Group. “We don’t have the option of doing that here.” Images of classical sculptures, warped by digital glitches, are in keeping with the tongue-in-cheek mood; miniature sculptures on the shelves cheekily take selfies or don leopard-print Speedos.
The living room features a dramatic stone fireplace and vaulted tongue-and-groove ceilings.
The curved Jardan Valley sofa in green brings geometric interest to the living room.
The "library under the stars" features thousands of old books plucked from antique shops.
Today, the Miller House in Columbus, Indiana, is a National Historic Landmark that is open to the public as a museum.
The fixed-gear bicycle hanging above the couch serves as an art piece; Chen no longer rides the bike. Le Corbusier Projecteur 165 pendant lights hang in the corner.
On the other side of the bathroom “box” is a lounge with a lofted reading room. The space also serves as the perfect play room.
The fourth bedroom is also bright, open, and airy—benefitting from the vaulted ceiling as well as a direct connection to the atrium.
What began as a stark room with pale-yellow walls and beige carpet is now a plush reading area.
The renovation installed modern aluminum double-pane sliding doors.
The architects widened the opening between the living room and dining room, then delineated it with brass accents. "Rather than try to match the existing historical moldings, we opted for minimal trim with brass inlays and a broad brass threshold marking the new opening," they said. The pendent lights are by Andrew Neyer.
The lower-level family room has a wet bar, a kitchenette, and doors leading to the backyard.
The living room is chic and polished, but still exudes a masculine vibe.
The high-ceilinged living space is designed for comfortable entertaining and features light wood paneling, a marble-framed fireplace, and an elegant bar off to the side.
Every mahogany wall was replaced with new ones, the contractor "painstakingly going through literally hundreds of panels over several days to find ones that matched," recalls Blaine. Since the quarter inch-round mahogany corners at the outside of the interior walls found in Eichler homes are no longer made, Blaine worked with the contractor to find a supplier of rounds that were then cut down to quarters.
As an architect who specializes in universal access design and ADA compliance and as a wheelchair user herself, Karen Braitmayer was no stranger to the challenges of accessible design. Although she had been able to take advantage of her 1954 home's single-level, open layout, as her daughter (also a wheelchair user) grew up, the family's accessibility needs also shifted. The main living area includes a more formal sitting area near the entrance, the dining area, Braitmayer’s workspace, and the kitchen—you can see the couple’s daughter working at the island. In the foreground is a pair of midcentury chairs; at left is a Heywood-Wakefield that Braitmayer found at an antiques shop. Seattle-based designer Lucy Johnson completed the interiors. The windows are from Lindal, and the exterior doors are from Marvin.
The living area features high ceilings with exposed rafters and lots of natural light.

The modern living room is one of the busiest spots in the house. It is where family and friends alike gather to share stories, watch movies, read, and unwind. As you'll find in the projects below, there are endless ways to configure a fresh living space with modern options for chairs and sofas, sectionals, end and coffee tables, bookcases, benches, and more. Innovative fireplaces add a touch of warmth.