301 Living Room Coffee Tables Bookcase Design Photos And Ideas

Amanda got rid of the mirrored wall and installed FLOS AIM Pendant Lights in the living room.
Architect Amanda Gunawan’s 1,620-square-foot Biscuit Loft in Downtown L.A. is awash in gentle light. Designed by French-born, Missouri-based architect E.J. Eckel in 1925, the building had been converted by Aleks Istanbullu Architect in 2006 into a live/work complex. Amanda introduced Japanese-inspired touches to soften the industrial language. The harmonious living room features a CB2 sofa, white Eames Lounge Chair and Ottoman, Knoll Wassily Chair, and a rug and timber bench from Zara Home.
Inside, the voluminous living area features a double-height fireplace clad in cedar and large-format tiles—both of which are echoed along the facade as well. Full-height windows wrap around the opposite corner, providing an abundance of sunlight and helping to naturally heat the space during wintertime.
In the Dank Lounge, a film screen lowers in front of room-darkening curtains on movie nights. The deep sectional was built by Lizz and Isaac while the Blob coffee table is by Project Room, and the Scandinavian rya rug is vintage. The couple’s art collection includes works by many friends and local artists. A print by Alex Smith, along with drawings by Cammie Staros and Karl Haendel, hang in the lounge beside a painting by John Finneran and a photo by Lizz.
A sofa from Città sits in the light-filled living room.
The couple’s two sons, Isaac and Charlie, play music with Charlie’s girlfriend, Saskia Randle, in the living room, where an Isamu Noguchi Akari lantern hangs above a Cloud sectional from RH Modern.
Living Room
Wood tones and earthy textures warm the reimagined living room. Much of the art were gifts that the couple bought for each other or pieces by mutual friends; the Mickey Mouse painting is by New Jersey–based artist Dylan Egon. "We like to bring some of the city into the country," says Lauren.
A collaboration between YUN Architecture and interior designer Penelope August, a renovated, 19th-century townhouse with landmark status used to be an egg and poultry distributor. Now virtually unrecognizable, the parlor floor is the home's open-plan living area. A formerly defunct fireplace was reactivated and clad with a custom-made, limestone mantle.
On one side of the house, a white central staircase leads to a split-level landing the Robertsons call "the reading room." "We needed a place to hang out and for the kids to read," explains owner Vivi Nguyen-Robertson. Awaiting the birth of the couple's son, she relaxes in a built-in reading nook in the library.
“The main living spaces, flowing from the central courtyard, fold down with the stepped concrete floor,” says Fox. “Plywood joinery and an off-form concrete ceiling anchor and harmonize.”
White oak flooring keeps the open-concept space feeling light and bright.
The designers raised the floor in the sunken den and painted the dated paneling Cotton Balls by Benjamin Moore. “We hardly ever used that space, and now we’re in there all the time,” says John. The credenza is a vintage find from Sunset Bazaar, while the  Blok horizontal sconce is from WAC Lighting.
The entrance foyer encapsulates the home’s themes of reuse—through the salvaged wood and metal gate—artisan furniture, and colourful abstraction. The Moroccan wall hanging is a vintage find, and the chairs and table are by local furniture designer Seth Keller. The industrial gate has been given a domestic twist with the addition of coat hooks for the client’s young child.
"I always knew there had to be a sight line from the living room to the kitchen, all the way to the back of the house," says Alex. "That really opened up everything [like], ‘Oh, yeah, this is the way it's supposed to be.’"
The Grove Modern bookshelf is from Room & Board, as is the tan leather sofa and the rug.
Floor-to-ceiling shelves and storage bookend a cabinet that conceals the television.
The pair replaced the cluttered firewood storage with a floating hearth that can double as a seat and display for art.
Raj and Watts extended the fireplace column to the ceiling to highlight the room’s expansive scale, and had it coated in concrete plaster. It was important to retain the wood-burning fireplace—a rarity in the city—but “we wanted to re-clad it in a material that also spoke to the industrial past of the building,” says Raj.
Zachary designed a new cabinet in walnut to anchor the room. The wood tones are a warm counterpoint to the butter-yellow sofa. The coffee table belonged to the owners.
The Curved Back sofa is from Lawson-Fenning. “It’s the most comfortable sofa,” says Zachary. “I have one, too.”
Chen designed circular copper bases for the Bluestone to create a coffee table with gravitas. The light is the Artemide Aggregato ceiling light with a counterweight.
In the living room, two shades of gray paint from Sherwin-Williams complement the upholstered furnishings from Knoll.
Given the home’s tight and efficient footprint, the architects sought to use simple materials and strategic moves to delineate different spaces and uses. The lower ceiling height of the living room, for example, distinguishes it from the dining area, which has a taller ceiling.
In this library, a Grant sleeper sofa by Mitchell Gold + Bob Williams is paired with a Cigar wall sconce by George Nelson.
Interior designer Nina Blair blends Ghanaian and Scandinavian influences in her family’s Tribeca apartment.
The family room couch is tucked into a nook to create a cozy retreat that still has views past the atrium to the backyard and kitchen.
The home is articulated along the ridge to command the highest point on the property, providing the clients with sweeping views across the rolling farmland.
Removing the hallway created room for a cozy family room upstairs. The family is enjoying the nesting process since the remodel was completed in 2017. "We are raising our kid here, learning how to cook, and I even started to do a lot of working from home here even before the pandemic," says Martin. "We hop from one place to the other, making minor changes and making them our favorite for some time. We spent lots of nights here."
"The clients really didn't want the TV to be the main feature of the living room, so we designed the piece with sliding panels to give the flexibility to hide the TV and reveal a bookshelf in the closed position," explains Peake.
The home was gutted in the remodel, and the living spaces were oriented to take better advantage of the existing window plan.
Original red oak floors were stripped and finished with a matte sealer to maintain a raw, unfinished look.
A deck opens up to the west from the main living space, and it’s the perfect place to watch the sunset. A long, low window at the rear of the space frames the tree line.
The clients fell in love with the double-sided Cheminees Philippe fireplace, which had been used in a previous Modscape project they had seen. “It works nicely in this home to help subtly define each space, and it’s a stunning feature,” says Modscape managing director Jan Gyrn.
Now, the kitchen sits at the front of the building, and the counter runs beneath the preserved windows. Built-in shelves frame the view.
Astrain updated the fireplace with a Carrara marble Victorian fireplace surround from The Architectural Forum.
Astrain streamlined the storage in the room, making room for wall art and allowing light to be diffused throughout.
The bright living room incorporates some of their own furniture prototypes with treasured midcentury collectibles. The T-square on the wall came from the estate of Albuquerque architect George Pearl; the hanging textile opposite is by fiber artist Romeo Reyna. The Finn Juhl chair comes from another estate sale, while the lights were made from standard, off-the-shelf parts. Darci and Dale also built the console and coffee table.
The artwork is titled "Crashing Buffalo" and is by Tucson/Los Angeles artist Ishi Glinsky.
The Adrian Pearsall sofa was sourced from The Swanky Abode on 1st Dibs, and the fire tools are also from the Sunshine Shop, a local vintage store.
The entry between the living room and dining room was widened.
Rossi kept important features of the old home throughout, such as the built-ins, fireplace, and original floors.
The custom-designed white maple modular coffee table can be kept together as one piece, or separated to form stools or smaller tables. "Each of the four cubes is slightly different, with a storage recess or dividing panel for stowing books, magazines, pillows, or other objects," says Thomas.
The living room received a Muuto Connect sofa, which was "notched into" the custom media cabinetry. The existing wood floors were refinished with an ebony satin stain with a charcoal tone.
Custom metal shelves display books. The flooring throughout is white oak, and its color syncs nicely with the tones in the brick—inside and out.
Maison Gauthier was intended to serve as a permanent family home rather than as a simple summer residence, and it adopts a more substantial sense of scale and materiality. The residence was designed for Jean Prouvé’s own daughter, Françoise—who was married to a doctor—and her young family. The site near Saint-Dié is to the southeast of the city of Nancy, where Prouvé had built his own family home some years earlier. The single-level home perches on the side of a hill, looking towards the town. It features walls made of insulated aluminum panels sitting on concrete foundations, along with horizontal strip windows around the bedrooms at one end of the building and more extensive glazing around the living area at the other.
Solid timber windows add warmth to every room. The solid timber flooring in the living/dining area provides additional character.
Two dividing orange bulkheads—which are the box gutters that protrudes through the house—separate the three pavilions. The family congregates in the central pavilion for meals around the dining table, and to relax in the lounge.
Red Hook’s proximity to the water is reflected in the living room’s "sea vibe."
The project team excavated a portion of the backyard to create a sunken patio that seamlessly meets the grade of the interior living spaces. The interior flooring is large-scale honed basalt tile (24" x 48" in size), which becomes 24" x 48" flamed basalt tile at the exterior patio.
The built-in sofa anchors the living room and faces the existing fireplace. The Leather Oval Chair with a red steel base sits off to the side, and the coffee table was fashioned by attaching vintage steel legs to another tile sample board.
Some of the furnishings came from the homeowners’ Dallas home, including the wooden chairs they purchased 35 years ago. The sofa is the Madison Sleeper Sofa from Bo Concept, while the side table is from Target. The lamp is from CB2. A British, antique officer’s cabinet contrasts with a modern bookshelf from Crate and Barrel.
Load-bearing drawers pull out from under the sofa, allowing the lounge to transform into a full bed that can sleep two adults. The drawers and cubbies underneath house their solar batteries, blankets, and other miscellaneous items. Above the lounge, a shelf displays the couple’s decorative items. And for movie nights, they place a projector on the shelf and hang a screen in front of the couch.
The most important aspect of a successful neutral palette? "Texture, texture, texture!," Pickens says.
The classic post-and-beam style defines the home's interior. Exposed wood ceilings and lightly colored hardwood floors run throughout the open concept living area.

The modern living room is one of the busiest spots in the house. It is where family and friends alike gather to share stories, watch movies, read, and unwind. As you'll find in the projects below, there are endless ways to configure a fresh living space with modern options for chairs and sofas, sectionals, end and coffee tables, bookcases, benches, and more. Innovative fireplaces add a touch of warmth.