23 Garage Garage Conversion Room Type Design Photos And Ideas

The architects transformed the old tool shed into an indoor lap pool.
Original elements such as the curved glass windows, added in the 1930s, remain, as does the original parquet floor.
Pendant lamps by Moooi are suspended from the double-height ceiling.
When you first approach the loft, you can choose to enter through a simple door, or through the garage door that slides back completely. This reveals the main workshop floor that has its own bathroom and painted concrete floors.
The ceiling features pin lights that effortlessly blend within the folded surfaces to make the studio feel as spacious as possible.
Designed by Jagoda, the door swings open to fit in front of a bookshelf.
Writing on the walls is encouraged by the magnetic slate chalkboard from Claridge Products. The Phoenix table by Patricia Urquiola for Moroso does double duty as a play table or a coffee table, depending upon who’s in residence. The Tulips felt rug is from Peace Industry, and was made in a fair-trade workshop in Iran. The casework is constructed of anigre wood.
The view from the kitchen looks across the courtyard into the playroom. The Stones stools are by Maya Lin for Knoll; the kid-friendly Teflon-coated Cybele fabric curtain is by Jack Lenor Larsen.
To reference the original structure and to offer privacy, Grizzle left two of the shingled walls standing. The building, accessed by a cedar deck, opens to its surroundings via a sliding glass wall by Fleetwood and a bifold steel-and-glass garage door from Wilson Doors.
When Libby May and Eoghan Mahony purchased a 1950s post-and-beam house in Los Angeles’ Santa Monica Canyon, they envisioned someday transforming the garage and adjoining workshop into livable space, with an office for each of them and a family room they could share with their sons, Wes, 14, and Duncan, 10.
To reference the original structure and to offer privacy, Grizzle left two of the shingled walls standing. The building, accessed by a cedar deck, opens to its surroundings via a sliding glass wall by Fleetwood and a bifold steel-and-glass garage door from Wilson Doors.
Light cascades into the living room through a row of six insulated timber windows on the south wall. The north wall flares out to create what Schaer calls a sunset scoop. “It grabs the late afternoon and evening sun and brings it deep into the space,” he explains.
Landscape designer Jay Griffith recreated the area between the house and the studio.
The Langs use an outbuilding as a rec room of sorts. "We call that the Grace Studio," Lang says. "It's designed so a car can pull in there, but we use it as more of a rec room and work space."
After a tree falls in Santa Monica, a garage is reborn as a 600-square-foot family gathering spot.
An architect reimagines an outdated brick garage by designing a graceful new family home atop its foundation.
Awkwardly shaped and saddled with a run-down garage, the backyard posed a challenge. Since the city wouldn’t allow for the removal of the garage, Wendi and Lukas decided to convert it into additional living space.
To allude to the nearby ocean, the architects designed a seaweed patterned for the interior of the garage door (seen here raised). It successfully reads like a leather padded wall and makes “the cube” feel that much more customized.
When not in use during winter, the tub is hidden from the home’s view. The entrance has a sheltered overhang for car parking.

The modern garage can be more than a mere storage space or a place to house your car—it can just as likely accomodate family activities or serve as an exterior design element. Whether attached or stand-alone, used as a workshop or converted into a studio, there is no single way to define its use. The inspired examples below are a testament to the range and diversity of the modern garage.

Get a Daily Dose of Design

Sign up for the Dwell Daily Newsletter and never miss our new features, photos, home tours, stories, and more.