44 Exterior Metal Siding Material Cabin Tiny Home Design Photos And Ideas

Winkelman Architecture delivers grown-up summer-camp vibes with this unassuming retreat on the coast of Maine.
On Bainbridge Island, Jim and Hannah Cutler created a cabin for reading and working. Sited just steps from the main house, it’s a welcoming retreat that the father and daughter share.
The firm wanted the materiality of the cabin to be "in harmony with the site," says Shaw. "So, that over time, the building could weather gracefully and the site around it would change, and they would do so in tandem."
The materials were kept simple: a foundation of board-formed concrete that reveals the wood grain of the boards used to make it, Cor-Ten steel siding that will develop a characterful patina, and rafters made of hemlock, a local species. "In terms of materials, we wanted the full exterior of the building to be something that would weather gracefully, that required very little maintenance, and that had a long life cycle," says Shaw.
Sited on a rock ledge, the Far Cabin’s screened porch cantilevers over the forest floor for a tree house effect.
The Far Cabin by Winkelman Architecture is set on the forested coast of Maine.
The exterior of Site Shack is covered in steel panels that are bolted to the framing. Look closely and you won’t see any visible fasteners, as Powers Construction’s welder was fastidious, creating a seamless shell with just steel and glass.
Both ÖÖD Iceland houses have a hot tub at the front overlooking the spectacular scenery. “This makes the experience even more surreal,” says CEO Andreas Tiik.
The glass front half of the cabin blurs boundaries between interior and exterior and completely immerses guests in the dramatic surroundings.
The cabins overlook the Hekla volcano, one of Iceland’s most active volcanoes. It is part of a 25-mile-long volcanic ridge, and during the Middle Ages it was referred to by Europeans as the "Gateway to Hell.”
The two cabins are named Freya and Alva, and feature the runes for “F” and “A” on the exterior timber wall. Signs from Nordic mythology are also found on the back of the houses. “The viking elements and the runes help the cabins fit into Icelandic history,” says CEO Andreas Tiik.
The harsh local climate—including strong winds and acid rain caused by the volcanic landscape—was a particular challenge. The cabin features a copper roof, which is one of the few materials that can cope with acid rain.
Two cabins sit in the vast, empty landscape overlooking the Hekla volcano, around three hours’ drive from Reykjavík. The front part of each cabin—for sleeping—is almost entirely glass, while the rear—where the living, kitchen and bathroom spaces are located—is clad in timber for privacy.
ÖÖD offers a range of “mirror houses”—tiny prefab cabins that are often used as guest houses, countryside getaways, and Airbnb accommodations. So far they’ve built projects in 12 different countries, including Estonia, Finland, and Norway. The ÖÖD Iceland home is a bespoke design, based on the clients’ wishes and strict local building requirements. These impacted everything from the dwelling’s structural properties and energy efficiency to the pitched roof.
At under 100 square feet, the 8' x 12' Site Shack includes just the essentials: a wood-burning stove, a desk, and storage.
Affordable, adorable, and in many cases, transportable, these tiny homes made a big impact on our readers this year.
Tucked away in California’s Sierra National Forest, this remote and rentable vacation home has a cozy interior that embraces outdoor views.
The cabin's curved zinc shell exudes a rugged, industrial look.
A north-facing veranda includes an outdoor seating area adjacent to a stone fire pit.
Fabshack is designed to be adaptive to many different site configurations. In this instance, it nestles into a rock outcropping on the architect’s property northwest of Sydney.
Architect Jesse Garlick’s rural Washington vacation home references its rugged surroundings. The steel cladding has developed a patina similar to the ochre-red color of bedrock found in the area.
The 301-square-foot cabin is situated on 99 acres on Bruny Island, an island off the coast of Tasmania. For the exterior, the architects have chosen materials that "comply with the Bushfire Attack Level of 19," they explain, including bushfire resistant wood and zincalume metal. The cabin collects its own rainwater—storage tanks are underground for an uncluttered look—and the roof sports solar panels.
Italian prefab company LEAPfactory built this alpine shelter off-site and had it flown in via helicopter. Cantilevered off the edge of a mountain, the structure features a living room, a dine-in kitchen, bunk beds, storage closets, and an integrated computer to keep mountaineers and climbers up-to-date on the weather conditions.
Located at 9,459 feet in elevation and run by the Swiss Alpine Club, the Monte Rosa Hut has been a popular destination at the Gorner Glacier since 2009. Designed by Bearth & Deplazes Architekten and dubbed the “rock crystal” because of its striking, ultra-modern design, the innovative structure is also virtually self-sufficient.
Skylodge Adventure Suites are luxury dwellings affixed to the mountainside in Peru's Sacred Valley, approximately nine miles north of Cusco. Visitors interested in staying at Skylodge must climb a quarter of a mile of protected trails and fly through the sky on zip lines.
The Gouter Refuge is located at 12,582 feet in elevation (about 3,280 feet below the summit of Mont Blanc) along the Gouter route. The four-story, rounded structure juts out over a 4,921-foot drop, and it's the last stop before the final climb to the summit of Mont Blanc. Commissioned by the French Alpine Club and designed by Swiss architect Hervé Dessimoz, the wooden structure is clad in stainless steel and took five years to design and three years to build.
Honomobo's HO4+ model is created out of four 40-foot shipping containers for a home that is not double wide but rather quadruple wide. In the 1,224 square feet of the home, owners can choose between a two-bedroom or three-bedroom option.
Italian architects Roberto Dini and Stefano Girodo designed this tiny bivouac structure in the Italian Alps to help encourage exploration of the remote location. Perched on the side of a mountain at an altitude of 10,794 feet, the structure was commissioned by the family of Luca Pasqualetti, a mountaineer who tragically passed away in the Alps. The installation was an exercise in well-planned logistics: The architects collaborated with the Italian prefab company LEAPfactory to assemble the unit in an off-site workshop, and the prefab pieces were lifted into place via helicopter and installed in a single day.
The new, semi-custom PreMade mobile units can be used in a variety of applications.
The Site Shack in a pristine natural setting in British Columbia.
Pick-up points on the exterior allow the Site Shack to be transported by crane with ease.
The Site Shack is seamless in appearance without visible fasteners.
A tough, rusted steel exterior holds up against the elements of a construction site.
Powers Construction uses the Site Shack as a space to meet with homeowners and discuss the project.
Powers Construction originally developed the compact and contemporary Site Shack as a mobile workspace for their residential job sites.
This house has an exterior of black panels and clear-grain cedar tongue-and-groove siding, and a rooftop deck that lets its owners enjoy the outdoors.
Oozing with charm, comfort, and modern amenities, these 10 micro homes are eagerly awaiting to help you experience the tiny house lifestyle. But brace yourself—you might become an aspiring tiny-house dweller after just one stay.
This 191-square-foot cabin near Vancouver and its glass facades "forces you to engage with the bigger landscape," architect Tom Kundig says, but it seals up tight when its owner is away. The unfinished steel cladding slides over the windows, turning it into a protected bunker. Read the full story here.
Alex devised a system that takes advantage of ocean views while protecting the cottage from that same northeasterly orientation. The large windows and doors can be shuttered with corrugated aluminum panels.
Buyers should cast as wide a net as possible in terms of location and amenities.
"With both sliding doors open, the two decks connect seamlessly through the building, dramatically changing the sense of scale, space, and connection to the site."
"Translucent glass in the sliding doors references the light qualities of Japanese rice-paper screens, creating a sense of enclosure and privacy at night, while encouraging the occupant to open them during the day," explain the architects. "They also prevent birds, including the endangered swift parrot, from attempting to fly through the building and striking the glass."
With a base price of $79,000, this 194-square-foot trailer is a complete tiny house on wheels and offers its owners flexibility of layout, as well as a wide range of optional customizations.
AO, Alpine Shelter “Bivak II na Jezerih”

Zoom out for a look at the modern exterior. From your dream house, to cozy cabins, to loft-like apartments, to repurposed shipping containers, these stellar projects promise something for everyone. Explore a variety of building types with metal roofs, wood siding, gables, and everything in between.