596 Exterior Glass Siding Material Flat Roofline Design Photos And Ideas

If you’re traveling to Puglia in Italy, one of the most iconic sights are trulli (trullo is the singular), an ancient hut that's specific to the Itria Valley in the Apulia region of Southern Italy. Made with dry stone, trulli date back to medieval times.
When Wexler and Harrison’s steel homes first hit the market in 1962, they were competitively priced between $13,000 and $17,000. Shown above is Steel House #2.
Originally built in 1957, this Twin Palms home was designed by William Krisel. Recently, the home was renovated with an updated kitchen and bathrooms that remain true to the residence’s midcentury character.
The box-shaped extension plays off the familiar farmhouse typology, creating a series of intriguing contrasts.
The ground-floor social spaces open up to a timber deck, which is used to extend the living room in warmer months.
The architects thought of the silver cedar cladding to the addition as "an exterior surface, skin, or bark" that wraps around the minimal cube form.
The brickwork of the original gabled farmhouse was painted white, referencing the local vernacular, and a new corrugated metal roof was added.
Building the addition upward instead of outward allowed for more space and better views without excavating across the hilltop.
A Cor-Ten steel "sleeping volume" seemingly floats atop a predominantly glass "living volume." Intersecting these two stacked volumes is a double-height, timber box which houses the multipurpose spaces.
Cedar, glass, and concrete combine in this minimalist pool house that draws inspiration from Mies van der Rohe’s 1929 Barcelona Pavilion. The pool house, built into a mountainside west of Montreal and designed by Halifax–based MacKay-Lyons Sweetapple Architects, employs board-formed concrete for the home's expressive exterior.
The green roof is planted with local succulents, including cascading pigface.
Bundeena Beach House connects the street and wider community to the water views beyond thanks to its low-lying form and a native roof garden, which the architect describes as a "green infinity edge."
Los Angeles–based writer Leslie Longworth knew she’d found the perfect retreat when she spotted a five-acre lot in Pioneertown. Immersed in the rugged beauty of Joshua Tree with a dirt road for access, it was an ideal creative space. Seeking a low-impact build, she hired prefab company Cover to draft, construct, and install a custom home. The prefab came complete with fixtures, finishes, Wolf Sub-Zero appliances, and a state-of-the-art radiant heating and cooling system. In order to design around endangered Joshua trees, boulders, and the view, Cover used a combination of 3D mapping via drone imagery and handheld photos.
If you've never set foot within a shipping container home, you might imagine them to be simple rectangles with no real consideration put into design, proportion, and the division of rooms. Well, think again: these floor plans prove that shipping container homes can be efficient, sustainable, and even exciting.
Large timber-framed glass sliding doors open the kitchen/dining space to the rear courtyard on two sides.
Conceived as an escape from city living, this 2,580-square-foot prefab comprises two primary and 11 secondary modules, while the 290-square-foot guest cabins consist of single modules craned into place atop concrete piers.
Built in 1949, Byrdview is one of four residential homes designed by the famed midcentury architect William Pereira, known for his futuristic designs that include the Transamerica Pyramid in San Francisco.
Comprising 11 modules, this green-roofed prefab was built in 90 days in a factory near São Paulo and then transported to the site in three shipments on flatbed trucks.
Located at 1811 Bel Air Road, Case Study House #16 was designed by Craig Ellwood in 1953. The residence has been meticulously maintained over the years by its two owners, and today it’s the only surviving Case Study design by Ellwood.
The home’s front facade is wrapped with translucent glass panels.
Set in the southwest hills of Portland, Oregon, this 1965 home was designed by noted local architect William Fletcher and entirely renovated in 2008. The low-lying home with a bright blue door was customized with elements that complemented the original midcentury architecture, including updates to all bathrooms, opening up the kitchen and adding cabinetry in Oregon black walnut, and transforming the car port into a dining room.
Rudolph used red cannonballs as weights to hold the home’s signature wood shutters in place.
At the rear, a double-height, glass-walled extension links the main living spaces to the exterior.
The minimalist facade is composed of floor-to-ceiling windows and light gray fiber cement panels secured with a proprietary blind mounting system.
For architect Stephen Chung, the design of his Wayland, Massachusetts, home was all about blending into the natural environment. The first floor is a serene composition of white and wood. The demand for a domestic office space inspired him to build up, adding a second floor for him to "experiment." In a departure from the Cape Cod aesthetic that rules his block, he was able to give the addition a modernist take, while also literally reflecting the existing landscape of the neighborhood. The entire 1,100-square-foot adjunct that encompasses his second story office-studio, master suite, and fort for his two young sons is swathed in mirrored siding and plate-glass windows.
Chen + Suchart Studio used coated glass and stainless steel over thick, sandblasted masonry walls to reflect the shifting hues of the desert sky and rugged landscapes of the Sonoran Desert. The Staab residence was built on creating a sense of privacy, without obstruction of the views of the McDowell Mountains. While nestled in a suburban setting, the 3,000-square-foot abode offers a stark contrast in design and ethos to the homes around. In addition to its contemporary bend, the house was designed to take in a multitude of focal points from two different levels, allowing for both distant and local views.
At dusk, the home emits a warm glow, appearing as a welcoming refuge in the landscape. The strong horizontality of the roof canopy visually accentuates the undulations of the surrounding landscape.
The bold geometric form is intended to offer refuge, while deep eaves provide shade in the summer and shelter from rain.
“We want the house to blend into the environment and feel like part of this place, not stand out,” says architect Ben Callery.
The floor to ceiling glass sliding doors opens the living spaces to the surrounding waterfront and landscape
Neatly tucked away on a tree-filled acre-lot within the Rolling Hills gated community, the Coe House was designed by Richard Neutra in 1950 for a local engineer and has since only had one other owner throughout the last 70 years.
The firm took inspiration from early barns in the area. “They’re very lightly built here because we don’t have snow,” says Haesloop. “So then the eaves are very tight. There are no overhangs. So, we were interested in using the Equitone to fold down to the land.”
This view shows the two forms backed by the Cypress trees. The main social areas are to the right, and the bedroom cube is to the left.
Windows wrap the length of the wall in the main section of the house and overlook the green space. “It’s a very unusual setting for the Sea Ranch—and Kieron, who’s from England, absolutely loves it because you get these beautiful big green meadows,” says architect Eric Haesloop.
“We wanted to create a house that did justice to the incredible landscape of the Sea Ranch, and also to its immediate surroundings—a combination of bright open space looking toward the ocean, but also an area that was sheltered and shaded by a gorgeous stand of Cypress trees,” say the couple. “We also wanted to preserve and honor the tradition of Sea Ranch architecture—Kieron is a huge history buff, and he had started reading about the origins of the Sea Ranch build paradigm, as well as the utopian ideals upon which it was founded in the 1960s.”
The terrace, furnished with pieces by Noé Duchaufour-Lawrance for Ligne Roset, is the perfect spot for taking in views of the L.A. basin.
The independent modular guest houses give the client the flexibility to expand in the future.
Untreated Lapacho timber planks—the same material used on the main house—clad the exterior of the two guest homes. In contrast to the horizontal cladding of the main house, the planks are vertically oriented here.
Located in the countryside in southern Uruguay, the prefabs overlook a gentle rolling landscape with eucalyptus trees, farm animals, and mountains in the far distance. The owners also have many domestic birds—including swans, peacocks, and ducks that freely roam the site.
In Rancho Mirage, California, a tired 1960s house is completely transformed with new features and materials that blend midcentury charm with contemporary taste. Despite a 1984 remodel, the desert midcentury that a couple recently purchased as their vacation home near Palm Springs had long suffered signs of aging with outdated finishes, deferred maintenance, and ill-proportioned rooms. Eager to breathe new life into the 1960s dwelling, the homeowners looked to Seattle–based Stuart Silk Architects for a gut renovation to bring their holiday home to modern standards.
Wexler and Harrison's original plan was to create affordable vacation homes for a growing middle class. When this home first went on the market with the others in 1962, it was competitively priced between $13,000 and $17,000. Today, the kitchen has been restored following guidelines from its original configuration, and the landscaping was updated in 2001 with Wexler's oversight.
The Thunderbird Heights house is set on a plateau above Coachella Valley and backs up to the Santa Rosa mountains to the south and west. The home, originally built in the 1960s and later renovated in the 1980s, was given a fresh, midcentury-inspired revamp by Stuart Silk Architects.
McCrae House 1 & 2
McCrae House 1
Street view
The firm worked to provide as much outdoor access as possible, so the living spaces spill out onto a protected veranda, and a ladder climbs up to the green roof.
These 20-foot shipping containers are repurposed into stunning luxurious hotel rooms.
Australia-based firm Contained specializes in transforming vessels that originally hauled heavy cargo all over the world into well-designed lodgings. The portable structures have the unique ability to travel almost anywhere. Each 20-foot container easily opens up, flips out, and unfolds into an individual hotel room that opens up to the surrounding landscape, wherever that may be.
As the story goes, Contained directors Anatoly Mezhov and Irene Polo envisioned these as ephemeral accommodations placed where there were no previous options. Born out of their love of traveling, the idea was to create a portable hotel room for short stays that can be set up anywhere.
This 180-square-foot cabin offers 360-degree views of the Hudson Valley.
A service yard is discreetly concealed behind a concrete screen. What appears as a series of concrete blocks opens up and becomes completely transparent on the hillside. It's all about embracing the views, the setting, and the climate.
At night, the concrete screen and glass walls reveal the living spaces beyond further emphasizing the transparency of the home.
The architects took advantage of the uneven site and nestled the home into the landscape, providing opportunity for a series of stacked volumes with different uses.
Landscape designer Vania Felchar selected tropical plant species that aligned with the contemporary architecture of the home. The climate inspired the choice of broadleaf species with many different shapes, resulting in an organic texture of greenery against a simple, refined formwork.
The second floor houses a 900-square-foot apartment that can be kept separate from the main floor residence for rental purposes or can be connected via a door. "In what had been an attic for storing fan belts and auto supplies, we created a large open apartment with full bath and kitchen," says McCuen.
The massive black box that hangs from the ceiling will host the foundation’s vast collection of Bauhaus works. Addendum architects wanted to create a space that felt open, so they housed the box in a transparent volume.
The Bauhaus Museum Dessau is centrally located in the German city, and it will showcase thousands of works from the design school.

Zoom out for a look at the modern exterior. From your dream house, to cozy cabins, to loft-like apartments, to repurposed shipping containers, these stellar projects promise something for everyone. Explore a variety of building types with metal roofs, wood siding, gables, and everything in between.