225 Exterior Glass Siding Material Flat Roofline Metal Siding Material Design Photos And Ideas

“The first floor was about making something warm and woody that would blend into the natural environment,” architect Stephen Chung says of his Wayland, Massachusetts, home. “The second floor was a chance to experiment.”
The terrace, furnished with pieces by Noé Duchaufour-Lawrance for Ligne Roset, is the perfect spot for taking in views of the L.A. basin.
The independent modular guest houses give the client the flexibility to expand in the future.
Untreated Lapacho timber planks—the same material used on the main house—clad the exterior of the two guest homes. In contrast to the horizontal cladding of the main house, the planks are vertically oriented here.
Located in the countryside in southern Uruguay, the prefabs overlook a gentle rolling landscape with eucalyptus trees, farm animals, and mountains in the far distance. The owners also have many domestic birds—including swans, peacocks, and ducks that freely roam the site.
Wexler and Harrison's original plan was to create affordable vacation homes for a growing middle class. When this home first went on the market with the others in 1962, it was competitively priced between $13,000 and $17,000. Today, the kitchen has been restored following guidelines from its original configuration, and the landscaping was updated in 2001 with Wexler's oversight.
These 20-foot shipping containers are repurposed into stunning luxurious hotel rooms.
Australia-based firm Contained specializes in transforming vessels that originally hauled heavy cargo all over the world into well-designed lodgings. The portable structures have the unique ability to travel almost anywhere. Each 20-foot container easily opens up, flips out, and unfolds into an individual hotel room that opens up to the surrounding landscape, wherever that may be.
As the story goes, Contained directors Anatoly Mezhov and Irene Polo envisioned these as ephemeral accommodations placed where there were no previous options. Born out of their love of traveling, the idea was to create a portable hotel room for short stays that can be set up anywhere.
The H4 is HONOMOBO’s most efficient shipping container home. At just over 700 square feet, the home has two bedrooms, a living room, a dining room, a full kitchen, and one bathroom.
A service yard is discreetly concealed behind a concrete screen. What appears as a series of concrete blocks opens up and becomes completely transparent on the hillside. It's all about embracing the views, the setting, and the climate.
At night, the concrete screen and glass walls reveal the living spaces beyond further emphasizing the transparency of the home.
The architects took advantage of the uneven site and nestled the home into the landscape, providing opportunity for a series of stacked volumes with different uses.
The residence stands out for its simplicity in the use of exposed concrete, metal, and aluminum frames. The simple, long, and narrow volume is accentuated by large eaves that provide shading from the sun's warm rays.
Landscape designer Vania Felchar selected tropical plant species that aligned with the contemporary architecture of the home. The climate inspired the choice of broadleaf species with many different shapes, resulting in an organic texture of greenery against a simple, refined formwork.
At first glance, the structure appears to be a single-story home. The surrounding trees create additional privacy as the yard begins to slope toward the rear.
Available to rent on Airbnb, the two-bedroom prefab house as a prototype for their pre-engineered IT House series and made an appearance in Dwell Magazine’s November 2008 issue.
Built of sustainable cross-laminated timber, a prefab cabin by the architecture firm MAPA offers a tranquil escape for São Paulo–based Maurício Uhle and Ralph Weigand. “We wanted to be in touch with nature, in a house made of wood and glass,” says Maurício. Adds Ralph, “We’d been searching for a solution that was well designed and cost-efficient and had a minimal impact on the environment.”
Comprising 11 modules, this green-roofed prefab was built in 90 days in a factory near São Paulo and then transported to the site in three shipments on flatbed trucks.
The structure is raised on stilts to allow air flow beneath the home and minimize damage to the landscape.
Inspired by LivingHomes’ RK2 model, this custom prefab-hybrid home was created for actor Will Arnett in Beverly Hills.
Plant Prefab was originally established in 2016 as an offshoot of LivingHomes, a design and development company that’s built dozens of award-winning prefabs—including actor Will Arnett's home.
The two-story addition hosts the master suite and a living area downstairs, and two bedrooms upstairs. It’s constructed of steel, concrete, and glass, to convey a “lightweight” quality that communes with the original mid-century architecture.
“Most homeowners would tear the whole thing down and start fresh,” says Brillhart. “But it made for a much more interesting project, preserving a little bit of Russell’s legacy and then adding two new wings on each side of the building.” An Ipe fence now lines the front of the property, and the two-story wing can be just glimpsed through the trees on the left.
The fully glazed upper floors of the two cabins are designed to take in views of the archipelago, which was inhabited by nomadic tribes before Spanish explorers arrived in the 16th century. Guillermo first visited the area in the mid-1970s. "It was very isolated then," he says. "The Pan-American Highway reached only to the city of Valdivia. From there, a narrow dirt road covered the remaining 400 kilometers to the Chacao Channel, which separates Chiloé Island from the mainland."
Built in 1953, the Wiley House is made up of a single glass-and-wood rectangular pavilion that’s perched on top of a rectangular box made of stone and concrete. Johnson chose the six-acre plot of land himself and was particularly fond of the natural slopes of the site, which is surrounded by hickory trees.
C-Glass House by Deegan Day Design engages not only Philip Johnson’s Glass House and the Farnsworth House by Mies van der Rohe, but also the California legacies of Elwood, Koenig and others. Though its architectural lineage is self-evident, this glass house is as indebted to artists’ explorations of glazed enclosures as it is to the precedents of Johnson and Mies.
Designed by Peter Bohlin of Bohlin Cywinski Jackson, the 3,000-square-foot house "incorporates the natural world by allowing one to experience the temperature, sights, and smells of the island as you travel through the house," Kasper says. He calls it "the house that Nirvana built," from his time as a producer for the world-famous band, along with their Seattle grunge brethren Pearl Jam, Soundgarden, Mudhoney, and the Foo Fighters.
246 East 58th Street was designed by Paul Rudolph in 1989 and is the only residence designed by Rudolph that is currently open to the public.
Argentinian architect Luciano Kruk has designed Casa Golf, a striking 2,949-square-foot dwelling that's comprised of three stacked concrete and glass volumes. Soaring high on a 10,764-square-foot plot of land, the contemporary residence is surrounded by breathtaking views and an unparalleled natural environment.
Minneapolis–based firm ALTUS Architecture + Design have designed a unique 2,850-square-foot residence in Woodland, Minnesota, by marrying glass-house architecture with a reflective "shiny" shed. The single-story property is primed for tranquility, as it sits on a peaceful woodland plateau and overlooks a lush wetland, as well as a calming lake in the distance.
Designed by Arthur Witthoefft of Skidmore, Owings & Merrill in 1961, this five-bedroom, five-bathroom midcentury house is set in the woods of Armonk, New York. The 5,000-square-foot home features full-height walls of glass, a wraparound floating terrace, and a quiet deck that overlooks the site's sylvan surroundings.
Nestled at the end of a private cul-de-sac on nearly an acre of pristine waterfront property in Sagaponack, New York, this distinctive, contemporary retreat from the renowned architectural firm Bates Masi + Architects makes a dramatic modern statement. Juxtaposing elegant, Alaskan cedar siding with broad expanses of glass, the home exudes an effortless and seamless flow between its indoor and outdoor spaces.
Two trunk-like columns support an aluminum-and-zinc-clad home in the foothills of the Santa Cruz Mountains designed by architect Craig Steely. With an intention to disrupt as few oak trees on the dense site as possible, Steely built the glass-walled house to nestle against the steep hillside. Visitors access the entrance from above, descending to the living spaces via a native grass-covered roof.
Flip House's open plan allows striking views outward to the city, bay, and garden. The back of the house was recast as the primary facade with a new glass wall, allowing natural light to fill the home throughout the day.
Built in 1954, the Donald and Helen Olsen House was designed by Berkeley architect Donald Olsen and is a well-preserved example of International Style. A modern masterpiece in Northern California's Berkeley Hills, the architecturally significant dwelling was landmarked by the city in 2009 and added to the National Register of Historic Places in 2010.
Inspired by midcentury modern design, this museum-like home was designed by Japanese architect and Harvard professor Toshiko Mori, who founded New York-based Toshiko Mori Architect. The home’s current owner wanted a property that deeply connected with the natural beauty that surrounds it.
Located in the south end of Halifax, Nova Scotia, Syncline was designed by Omar Gandhi Architect. The quiet, masculine modern form sits adjacent to Point Pleasant Park and overlooks the North-West Arm.
Fully renovated, Capilano House is a west coast modern home overlooking Capilano River in North Vancouver by Miza Architects.
Northeast FaçadeIn a naturally fragmented and disconnected context, the Gafarim House offers monolithic, opaque volumes to the street, citing the compact, parallelepipedic masses of northern Portuguese popular architecture and adjusting its scale to the surroundings.
The Eames House, also known as Case Study House #8, is on Chautauqua Drive in the Pacific Palisades area of Los Angeles, California.
Manitoga, or Dragon Rock, was the residence of industrial designer Russel Wright and is filled with design details that incorporated nature, including rooms with boulders rising from the floors and a tiered layout that worked with the natural topography.
A look at the elevated west wall and entry. Here, insulated black panels spaced in glass cladding guard the home against harmful weather while reflecting beautiful silhouettes of the garden.
The home features a formal garden, AV room, sauna, and swimming pool.
Viewed from the backyard, Greenwich Village Townhouse by Ryall Sheridan Architects gives off a warm, earthy glow.
Completed in just six weeks by Australian practice Archiblox, this modest prefab home is perched atop cliffs with prime views of Avalon Beach, just a short drive away from Sydney. Oriented east to west to maximize cross ventilation, the house is clad in marine-grade Colorbond Ultra steel and Queensland blue gum to protect against the elements.
On the green roof, guests enjoy stunning panoramic views, a hydromassage pool, and a lounge area.
Set on a steep slope, the building features angled geometry that mimics the mountains and terrain.
The Continuous Extension exterior is defined by coarse spray plaster, large floor-to-ceiling windows, and larch banding.
Stepped outdoor terraces, with landscaping by Colin Okashimo Associates, wrap the house’s curves, and also act as a buffer for floodwaters.
Architect Guillermo Acuña’s sprawling getaway lines the coast of Isla Lebe in the Chiloé Archipelago in Chile. <span style="font-family: Theinhardt, -apple-system, BlinkMacSystemFont, &quot;Segoe UI&quot;, Roboto, Oxygen-Sans, Ubuntu, Cantarell, &quot;Helvetica Neue&quot;, sans-serif;">Guillermo used fast-growing, sustainable radiata pine for the cabins, both of which feature a living/dining area and kitchen on the upper level and three bedrooms on the ground floor.</span>
Wexler thought steel was a good material for desert building. He told the Los Angeles Times: “With steel you get clean, sharp lines that will look good forever. Nothing can destroy it. Nothing can affect it.”
A small sitting patio just outside the kitchen door.
The home is located in the Movie Colony East neighborhood, on land that was once part of the Frank Sinatra estate before it was subdivided.

Zoom out for a look at the modern exterior. From your dream house, to cozy cabins, to loft-like apartments, to repurposed shipping containers, these stellar projects promise something for everyone. Explore a variety of building types with metal roofs, wood siding, gables, and everything in between.