468 Exterior Metal Roof Material House Design Photos And Ideas

The back deck provides the perfect spot for entertaining and enjoying the lush landscape.
The wood and stucco addition features a pitched metal roof that complements the existing home's midcentury style. The hidden side windows (by the planter) allow natural light to filter in.
From the street, a discrete metallic wall features two green steel doors on either side.
The building’s historical façade was preserved and the the original company sign was retained.
The large, sliding doors pocket into the deep stone walls, completely opening up the living space to the outdoors.
A simple composition in form, but intelligent in detail and execution, the peaked-roof dwelling is a stunning wood- and stone-clad living space.
From afar, the home closely resembles the traditional architectural character of the surrounding heritage.
This home is iconic of Sugden’s work in Utah, and is a direct expression of both the Modernist movement and the Bauhaus school.
Like all of Sugden’s work, the building frame is entirely made of A36 steel that is joined exclusively with moment-resisting welded connections, and rests on an exposed, reinforced concrete foundation.
The Starlight is 2,007 square feet and wraps a courtyard. It includes three bedrooms, one of which is a separate master wing.
The sheet metal roof and wood cladding of the new structure complements the smooth, shiny birch tree barks on the site.
In winter, the extension looks as if it’s covered in snow.
The ribbed texture of the facade echoes the whitewashed walls of the area’s rural barns.
The new addition consists of a white prism that rests atop a concrete pedestal.
“The factory-built modules were carefully transported up winding roads and set in place without harming a single tree,” adds the firm.
The main house comprises two primary and 11 secondary modules organized into two offset bars. One volume houses the great room that is oriented for views of the valley, while the master bedroom and study located in the other volume face northern views of the canyon.
The property offers 64 acres of varied terrain, including an open meadow, manzanita thickets, and forests full of oak, madrone, Douglas fir, and ponderosa pine.
All three flat-roofed buildings are clad in weathering steel expanded metal rainscreens, while floor-to-ceiling operable glass walls bring the outdoors in.
"In contrast to their introverted loft, High Horse Ranch was designed to be outwardly focused and defined by the site, its views, and the natural landscape," says KieranTimberlake.
Each cabin was assembled from single, mostly completed modules craned into place and raised atop concrete piers. The cabins include a bedroom and bathroom, a study desk, a  covered porch and a fire pit.
Trout Lake | Olson Kundig
The rich material palette of stone, timber, glass, and board-formed concrete blend the home into the surroundings.
A glazed staircase placed on the south side of the building next to the hillside leads to the bedrooms on the upper level.
The house was strategically placed between the lake and an adjacent granite rock-face to capture key landscape views.
The property in Gooderham is set at the end of the original lake access road, and enjoys 1,300 feet of uninterrupted lakeside shoreline.
Exterior of Pink House from the street. The entryway is recessed to enhance the spatial notion of soild and void.
The original roof was flat with a flush parapet. In the early 90s, the former owners had a low-pitched roof placed on top of the existing roof, as well as new corrugated siding to cover the parapets. During the renovation, the interim roof was removed, and a new minimum-slope roofing structure was erected on the existing beams—reinstating the roof section toward the original design. The parapet is now clad with copper paneling.
The project encompassed exterior renovations and retrofitting, as well as four small additions to the building, and the construction of a new roof and landscaping.
When the current homeowners acquired the property from its original owners, the house had been well-maintained and was in good condition. The dwelling was even equipped with an HVAC system, a rare innovation for the period and building type.
The original building is set around an L-shaped courtyard. The main entrance is next to the carport on the street side, with a second entry toward the back of the house.
The goal of the renovation was to respect the high quality work of Kristinsson's original design, and retain the intent of the home where the interior spaces flow seamlessly into the exterior.
Generous balconies reach back into the surrounding forest at every level.
Living area at night time
Given the simplicity of the house’s brick façade—a seven-foot brick base with a massive gabled roof on top—the complex spatial geometry of the interiors comes as a surprise to visitors.
The owner—a ceramics artist—wanted to make the best of the topography of the lot, and also requested views of the site's nearby horse arena.
The home frames the spectacular view of the lake
The large terrace is shaded by trees.
The property is constructed with exclusively recyclable materials and maintains a low level of energy consumption.
Sitting less than 20 feet from the water’s edge, the home enjoys a spectacular lakeside view.
The poured concrete foundation is clearly visible when viewing the back of the home.
After months spent researching solutions to make her home’s fabric roof functional, Lisa Sette can finally relax.
The houses in this area are very isolated, with no visual contact between houses.
The distance between homes in the area allowed architect Felipe Assadi to make a grand gesture by painting the two-level house bright red to complement the intense green of the surrounding trees, and to "activate the relationship between the landscape and the project through contrast."
Jamie and Ingrid stained the timber facade a dark blackish-brown to blend the shack into the landscape, but kept the window frames white for a stark pop of contrast.
Riffing on local farmhouses, architects Patrick Walker and Elizabeth Demetriades covered the 4,000-square-foot house in rough-sawn red cedar and capped it with a standing-seam galvalume roof.
The elegant retreat combines contemplative spaces with a sense of drama.
Exposed concrete walls provide thermal mass and protection from wildland fires.
Since the home is located in a Class D Seismic Zone, the architects have designed the home beyond code-required structural standards with concrete foundations, steel columns, and composite decking.
A break in the concrete facade reveals the front entrance, which is marked by a thin steel canopy and two chimneys.
To meld the building with the landscape, the architects expanded the aspen grove around the southern approach to the structure.
The black facade of the Yatabes’ house may turn a darkly futuristic face to its suburban block, but behind it the house is full of light. In Saitama, a tightly packed neighborhood near Tokyo, the black metal screen affords the family privacy without sacrificing outdoor space.
Mori’s addition is constructed of steel, concrete, glass, and bluestone veneer. She decided to preserve the ceiling height of the main house (11’6”) and lined the roof with Voltaic solar panels.
The glass-enclosed master bedroom floats above the corrugated, oxidized steel exterior.
For a cost-conscious 2,000-square-foot renovation located 30 minutes outside of Austin, Texas, architect Nick Deaver took a look around for inspiration. He spied galvanized metal cladding on the region’s sheds and co-opted the inexpensive, resilient material for his own design.

Zoom out for a look at the modern exterior. From your dream house, to cozy cabins, to loft-like apartments, to repurposed shipping containers, these stellar projects promise something for everyone. Explore a variety of building types with metal roofs, wood siding, gables, and everything in between.