787 Exterior Metal Roof Material House Design Photos And Ideas

Located in Sierra Madre, California, an existing ranch home with clean architectural geometry, was transformed into a contemporary home with an expanded open floor plan, improved circulation and access, and carefully placed clerestory windows. On the exterior, revised garage orientation eliminates excessive driveway paving and reestablishes the front yard as usable space.
"The roof that connects the two volumes makes it possible to use the patio even when it rains or when the dew settles," note the architects. "This way the house is adapted for Swedish summer— it works in all kinds of weather."
The timber decking that connects the existing cottage to the new volumes emphasizes indoor-outdoor living.
The volume that extends toward the south of the site (to the right of the central volume) also contains two bedrooms.
The house is clad in vertical planks of black-painted fir.
A place of unspoilt nature, the island property spans approximately 1.6 acres.
"It is so beautiful around here with the wildlife and the vegetation—the less disturbed, the better," says Axboe.
The house was designed to seamlessly integrate into its surroundings. It is conceived as a "looking box" to the mountain ranges, with ample outdoor decks and patios to enjoy the views.
Scott and Lauren’s compact backyard home is located in the back half of their 5,000-square-foot lot in the Richmond neighborhood of Southeast Portland.
The home's main entry—two levels off the street—forces guests to get intimately acquainted with the steep topography of the site. Although the home's residents have the option to enter via garage and interior stair, guests instead travel up exterior stairs at the corner of the site, passing the planted neighboring lot to reach the home's front door.
Earthy, organic materials were favored for the home's composition. The exterior palette features Pietra Serena limestone, color-integral stucco, metal panels, and stained cedar.
A peek at the surrounding lush landscape.
Materials used for the exterior include stucco, wood, metal, and concrete.
A view of the home at night.
The main entrance to the home is located opposite the door of the outbuilding.
The home also includes a small outbuilding that echoes the main building's monochromatic, gabled form.
The vertical corrugated metal siding mimics the verticality of the trees.
A large cedar deck offers outdoor entertaining opportunities. The outdoor furnishings are by COOP Etabli.
A pathway winds through the woods from the parking pad to reveal the cottage and a raised cedar walkway.
A view of the house from the southeast approach.
Nestled in the woods, Chalet Grand-Pic was completed for construction costs of approximately $227,000.
Since the council wouldn't allow off-street parking or a dedicated crossover, the architects created a "hidden" sliding side gate (seen open in this image) to provide vehicle access if needed.
The exterior door adds a pop of color to the white and gray facade.
Steel columns echo the Norwegian folk form.
The house features a simple gable roof.
Gregory Creek Residence - Exterior
Evening at Gregory Creek
Blackened, recycled wood slats define the front entry alcove. "The design of House A was originally intended to challenge the status quo of oversized and low-quality housing in Western Australia," say the architects.
Soft gray concrete, a polycarbonate screen, and metal roof bedeck the simple front facade of House A. Not immediately apparent? An underground water collection tank and solar panels. "We used a really high recycled content mix for our tilt-up concrete walls, which have 65-percent slag [a byproduct of steel production] instead of high-carbon emitting Portland cement," say the architects.
Western Red Cedar with a clear vertical grain was paired with vertical and horizontal shiplap for the exterior siding.
The back of the home opens up to an outdoor patio, hot tub, and fire pit.
Originally built in 1974 as a kit home, the A-Frame was constructed with cedar siding and metal roofing. The house faces east toward the water.
In good weather, the owners can open up the exterior glass walls.
Entry to the house is accessed via the gravel arrival court. A floating ledge bridges to the front door, which is located in a "glazed volume set between two of the buildings," said the architects.
The project recently won a Gold Pin in the 2018 Best Design Awards. The judges were impressed with how “the residence settles completely and utterly into its location with exceptional detail, and a sensitivity that responds to its changing environment through the seasons.”
In contrast to its heavily glazed north facade, the home's other three sides are closed off from view for privacy.
A splash band of black Richlite wraps the base of the building to protect the timber siding from the snow and rain.
A separate two-car garage is located near the entrance of the house, which has a bike rack and planters out front.
Reinforced concrete was used for the retaining walls and slabs along all grades, while wood framing with steel framing beams were used at cantilevered areas.
Because the studio does not have air-conditioning, it relies on natural ventilation for passive cooling. Its north orientation harnesses good solar gains.
The small studio is sited along a gentle slope and is raised upon steel supports to take in views of the tree canopies.
"Both the deep-set windows and the brise soleil, in addition to the back canted wall, help to control solar gain."
A glimpse of the entrance at dusk from the south elevation. To the right is a swimming pool shielded behind wooden fencing.
A view of a gravel walkway and the entrance that leads to a covered pathway. "The entry side is hyper minimal and mysterious with slight glimpses out from within, providing only a tease on approach from the road," says the firm.
The deck projects out toward the beach.
"The dark silhouette of the fortress-like structure [is] one of few things seen through the thick fog," add the architects.
Extra-dark bronze standing-seam metal partly clads the home and creates an armored appearance.
Located on the southern shore of Nova Scotia in Kingsburg, Treow Brycg is set in wild landscape of rocks, the sea, and tall grasses.
A view of the main home's sheltered entrance with the annex to the right. All buildings feature continuous exterior insulation.
This annex houses a large recreation room as well as a guest suite.
A dramatic cantilevered roof helps mitigate unwanted solar heat gain while inviting in warm winter light.
Completed for an approximate cost of $2,000,000, the modern, net-zero home features 3,835 square feet and is located in the heart of Suncadia’s master-planned community.
To recall the region's past as a historic mining town, a rustic palette of mostly natural materials were applied to the home, including stone, Cor-ten steel, and reclaimed barn wood with modern detailing.

Zoom out for a look at the modern exterior. From your dream house, to cozy cabins, to loft-like apartments, to repurposed shipping containers, these stellar projects promise something for everyone. Explore a variety of building types with metal roofs, wood siding, gables, and everything in between.