534 Exterior Metal Roof Material House Metal Siding Material Design Photos And Ideas

The fully glazed upper floors of the two cabins are designed to take in views of the archipelago, which was inhabited by nomadic tribes before Spanish explorers arrived in the 16th century. Guillermo first visited the area in the mid-1970s. "It was very isolated then," he says. "The Pan-American Highway reached only to the city of Valdivia. From there, a narrow dirt road covered the remaining 400 kilometers to the Chacao Channel, which separates Chiloé Island from the mainland."
Architect Reinhold Andris has lived in this house in southwestern Germany since 1998. Fifteen years on, the structure remains emblematic of his modernist perspective. "It’s a very open architecture," he says, noting the near-invisible steel frame and pervasive use of glass.
Surrounded by wheat fields on a high-altitude plateau stands a small glass house and a solid, traditional barn. The owners, inspired by Philip Johnson’s Glass House, wanted a refuge that opens up to the prairie and mountains.
In order to achieve a contemporary exterior while still keeping a feeling of warmth, Martin Gomez Arquitectos chose to use dark metal, black flagstone, and lapacho wood as cladding.
A layering of old and new, solid and transparent are evident in the play of materials and form. The original brick walls remain, wrapped by the wood- and metal-clad addition.
Built in 1953, the Wiley House is made up of a single glass-and-wood rectangular pavilion that’s perched on top of a rectangular box made of stone and concrete. Johnson chose the six-acre plot of land himself and was particularly fond of the natural slopes of the site, which is surrounded by hickory trees.
C-Glass House by Deegan Day Design engages not only Philip Johnson’s Glass House and the Farnsworth House by Mies van der Rohe, but also the California legacies of Elwood, Koenig and others. Though its architectural lineage is self-evident, this glass house is as indebted to artists’ explorations of glazed enclosures as it is to the precedents of Johnson and Mies.
The Pincecone tree house is accessed via a steep wooden ladder and a trap door that unfolds down from the top.
A view of the solar panels and extra gardening space on the green roof.
The two-story addition as seen from the back. A green roof provides extra gardening space for the family.
Gardiner Architects clad the bungalow in timber shiplap and sheet metal. “The external form of the Californian bungalow had the defining feature of the typical gabled roof,” says the firm. “The roof of the new section takes the vernacular form of the gables offset from the retained roof. We liked this sensitive approach that saw the new extension not dominating the existing. In a sense, it could've always been there.”
Minneapolis–based firm ALTUS Architecture + Design have designed a unique 2,850-square-foot residence in Woodland, Minnesota, by marrying glass-house architecture with a reflective "shiny" shed. The single-story property is primed for tranquility, as it sits on a peaceful woodland plateau and overlooks a lush wetland, as well as a calming lake in the distance.
Designed by Arthur Witthoefft of Skidmore, Owings & Merrill in 1961, this five-bedroom, five-bathroom midcentury house is set in the woods of Armonk, New York. The 5,000-square-foot home features full-height walls of glass, a wraparound floating terrace, and a quiet deck that overlooks the site's sylvan surroundings.
Nestled at the end of a private cul-de-sac on nearly an acre of pristine waterfront property in Sagaponack, New York, this distinctive, contemporary retreat from the renowned architectural firm Bates Masi + Architects makes a dramatic modern statement. Juxtaposing elegant, Alaskan cedar siding with broad expanses of glass, the home exudes an effortless and seamless flow between its indoor and outdoor spaces.
Two trunk-like columns support an aluminum-and-zinc-clad home in the foothills of the Santa Cruz Mountains designed by architect Craig Steely. With an intention to disrupt as few oak trees on the dense site as possible, Steely built the glass-walled house to nestle against the steep hillside. Visitors access the entrance from above, descending to the living spaces via a native grass-covered roof.
Built in 1954, the Donald and Helen Olsen House was designed by Berkeley architect Donald Olsen and is a well-preserved example of International Style. A modern masterpiece in Northern California's Berkeley Hills, the architecturally significant dwelling was landmarked by the city in 2009 and added to the National Register of Historic Places in 2010.
Inspired by midcentury modern design, this museum-like home was designed by Japanese architect and Harvard professor Toshiko Mori, who founded New York-based Toshiko Mori Architect. The home’s current owner wanted a property that deeply connected with the natural beauty that surrounds it.
Located in the south end of Halifax, Nova Scotia, Syncline was designed by Omar Gandhi Architect. The quiet, masculine modern form sits adjacent to Point Pleasant Park and overlooks the North-West Arm.
Fully renovated, Capilano House is a west coast modern home overlooking Capilano River in North Vancouver by Miza Architects.
Northeast FaçadeIn a naturally fragmented and disconnected context, the Gafarim House offers monolithic, opaque volumes to the street, citing the compact, parallelepipedic masses of northern Portuguese popular architecture and adjusting its scale to the surroundings.
This gabled addition by Upstairs Studio Architecture is topped with a standing seam metal roof and is clad in vertical corrugated metal siding.
A look at the elevated west wall and entry. Here, insulated black panels spaced in glass cladding guard the home against harmful weather while reflecting beautiful silhouettes of the garden.
The public spaces are all located on the ground level. The home fully opens up to the private garden.
Inspired by the Sydney Opera House, architects Andrew Maynard and Mark Austin paid careful attention to the extension’s “fifth elevation"—the way it’s seen from the sky. Its tiny houses, clustered at the southern end of the property, are clad in white steel panels and western red cedar shingles, contrasting materials that emphasize their geometric forms.
The Element House by MOS Architects stands on pylons, creating the illusion of it hovering over the desert floor. Nine thermal chimneys, one of which can be seen right, channel hot air out from the interior living areas.
Because the area lacks distinctive natural features, House 3000 by Luis Rebelo de Andrade has quickly become a landmark that helps orientate visitors to the site.
Framing picturesque views of a small valley and nearby orchard, Baumhaus Halden is comprised of a steel frame with four wooden support beams.
The home features a formal garden, AV room, sauna, and swimming pool.
The project’s unique challenges—a tight budget and steep, difficult terrain—led architecture firm _naturehumaine to a creative solution that gave the house its delightfully sculptural appearance. Making the first floor’s envelope slightly narrower than the top one’s saved money while minimizing the amount of excavation required.
Architect and builder Tim Sharpe and his wife Rani Blancpain wanted a home that would allow them to enjoy an indoor/outdoor lifestyle. Surrounded by hoop pines, Twin Barns comprises two farmhouse-style buildings: an approximately 3,600-square-foot, four-bedroom home; and a 900-square-foot "granny flat."
In a historic and flood prone city the Dorgenois residence is raised with most program on the second floor. The architects designed this home for themselves using it as a chance to experiment with Corten cladding and perforated screen, materials less common in this climate.
O'Sullivan says he travels from New Zealand's northern island to his satellite studio in Christchurch once a week.
Set on a steep slope, the building features angled geometry that mimics the mountains and terrain.
Architect Mark Fullgar chose corrugated steel, aluminum window frames, and strengthened glass—cost-effective, non-combustible materials, given the cabin’s location in a rural fire zone.
The Monokuro House blends minimalist, Japanese-inspired architecture with indoor/outdoor California living.
On an island 20 miles off the coast of Maine, a writer, with the help of his daughter, built not only a room, but an entire green getaway of his own.
Architect Jesse Garlick’s rural Washington vacation home references its rugged surroundings. The steel cladding has developed a patina similar to the ochre-red color of bedrock found in the area.
A view of the ipe-and-steel bridge from the main house to the annex.
Surrounded by a sea of forest in Northern California, the Portola Valley House features fire-resistant construction. The annex is wrapped with Corten corrugated siding, while shou sugi ban treated timber clads the main house.
Architect Jesse Garlick’s rural Washington vacation home references its rugged surroundings. The steel cladding has developed a patina similar to the ochre-red color of bedrock found in the area.
The project's prime, corner lot real estate dictated the organization of the separate living quarters. The main house's driveway and entryway, for example, are located on Maude Street, giving permanent residents a sense of privacy.
Spacious windows and a slotted facade provide curbside appeal at every angle.
Maude Street House by Murray Legge
Because the area lacks distinctive natural features, House 3000 has quickly become a landmark that helps orientate visitors to the site.
“At night, this annex glows like a jewel box,” note the architects.
The annex "lanai" opens up to the deck for indoor/outdoor living.
The exterior combines recycled brick, radial sawn timber, and galvanized roof sheeting. "Materials were selected to meet the clients’ brief that the house fit within the cognitive idea of an old shed," explain the architects.
The beach shack's corrugated metal shell is detailed with curved edges. The building faces northeast to take advantage of ample sunlight and ocean views.
Built of galvanized steel, the new front door conveys safety and security. The owners had previously experienced a break-in, and they thought a more imposing entrance could serve as a deterrent. Directly behind the entry is the courtyard linking the old and new buildings.
The architects designed an asymmetrical roof so as to avoid shading the neighbors' backyard. Note how the window awnings appear to peel up and away from the facade.
Located in North Fitzroy, the 2,272-square-foot Grant House is set on a long and narrow east-facing site with shared side alley access.
White Colorbond cladding wraps the new extension to maximize solar reflectance and reduce dependence on mechanical cooling.
The view from the home towards the water, sky, and surrounding cliffs.
The home's punched windows are shaded by Cor-Ten steel.
Based on Stillwater's sd-133 plan, this home has 2,300 square feet of space with dramatic ceilings (over 12 feet high) and no interior load-bearing walls. The home also features Stillwater's signature butterfly roof.

Zoom out for a look at the modern exterior. From your dream house, to cozy cabins, to loft-like apartments, to repurposed shipping containers, these stellar projects promise something for everyone. Explore a variety of building types with metal roofs, wood siding, gables, and everything in between.