413 Exterior Metal Roof Material House Flat Roofline Design Photos And Ideas

The contemporary home is a beautiful take on desert modernism.
Luciano Kruk devised an economical floor plan at the clients’ request. “The house was constituted as a compact block,” said the firm, with shared living spaces on the ground floor and two bedrooms—one a private master and the other a bunk room—up top.
MWArchitekten utilized local wood to harmonize the home's interiors with its facade.
Set on a steep slope, the building features angled geometry that mimics the mountains and terrain.
The 1000-square-foot ADU is two levels with a footprint that allows the owners to retain plenty of outdoor space for their dogs to play. The façade “is a rain screen system, so the heat gain on the Brazilian hardwood is minimized by being physically separated by an air gap between it and the membrane behind it,” said Knight. “So, the wood heats up when sun hits it and this is not directly translated into the wall on the interior; it is instead buffered by this air gap.” The large doors and second-story skylights then work together to pull a nice breeze through the house.
The 1,000-square-foot ADU is two levels with a footprint that allows the owners to retain plenty of outdoor space for their dogs to play. The facade “is a rain screen system, so the heat gain on the Brazilian hardwood is minimized by being physically separated by an air gap between it and the membrane behind it,” says Knight. “So, the wood heats up when sun hits it, and this is not directly translated into the wall on the interior; it is instead buffered by this air gap.” The large doors and second-story skylights then work together to pull a nice breeze through the house.
Perched on a hillside, the midcentury-inspired home is well integrated into the natural landscape.
The project's prime, corner lot real estate dictated the organization of the separate living quarters. The main house's driveway and entryway, for example, are located on Maude Street, giving permanent residents a sense of privacy.
Spacious windows and a slotted facade provide curbside appeal at every angle.
Maude Street House by Murray Legge
Set back from the street, the International-style home features deep, overhanging eaves and a band of clerestory windows that wraps around the entire home.
Wild bush, sand dunes, and scrub surrounds the circular home. The architects were careful to minimize the building impact on the fragile landscape.
The villa's chunky rectangular forms set against a Los Angeles sunset.
The architects write: "Most Australians want a deck or veranda, instead of adding something to the outside, like that of the classic old Australian home. At St Andrews Beach House, the deck has been eroded out of the form itself, creating a two-story space that’s both outside and inside."
The silvertop ash shiplap boards that clad the home will develop a patina over time.
The home's punched windows are shaded by Cor-Ten steel.
A peek of the Axiom Desert House from the exterior, with the beautiful San Jacinto mountain range in the distance.
At just under 3,000 square feet with three bedrooms plus an office, this home follows the basic plan of Stillwater's sd-161 design. It also features a separate guest house with two bedrooms.
Clerestory windows bring in daylight, supplemented by museum-quality lighting, to highlight the homeowner's art collection.
Based on Stillwater's sd-133 plan, this home has 2,300 square feet of space with dramatic ceilings (over 12 feet high) and no interior load-bearing walls. The home also features Stillwater's signature butterfly roof.
Stillwater Dwellings visits each site to determine the best orientation for a building to take advantage of sun patterns and prevailing winds.
Built into the foot of a forested mountain, the Pool House is located at the edge of the St. Lawrence River valley floor.
"The seamless connection from the interior fitness area to the exterior pool and spa aligns perfectly with the client’s wellness agenda," MacKay-Lyons says. "Additionally, the mechanical plant is hidden from view below ground, behind the house."
The spa building behind the pool is topped by a green roof.
A zigzagging path built of locally sourced Stanstead granite leads throughs a field of grasses to the Pool House.
A south elevation view of the home. The southern porch, which faces the river, is the "extroverted" courtyard, while the northern courtyard offers a more intimate and "introverted" feel.
Exterior drone axonometric
Exterior
Exterior at Dusk
Exterior within Context
"The wood exterior was selected to make the house blend in with the landscape," Troyer says. "I wanted something that didn’t require painting and aged in a way that would provide a degree of richness. " He envisioned a garden that better surrounded the home, and a more modern exterior. He used ash wood slates of various dimensions from Thermory USA, which were heat-treated for a more sustainable finish.
A lighthouse of cutting-edge digital fabrication, the building glows like a beacon at night.
Photovoltaic modules mounted on the roof will cover all of the building's electricity needs.
A view of the three-story DFAB House perched atop the NEST Building.
Angled towards the sun, the solar panels meet all of the studio's energy needs with enough energy left over to power the adjacent house.
This two-bedroom, two-bathroom standard Hygge Supply model was built on a corner lot in Traverse City, Michigan.
Milwaukee studio Vetter Denk Architects designed this eye-catching prefab on the banks of Moose Lake, Wisconsin, as a weekend retreat. 

The home was based on an idea presented by the home's owner, who was inspired by a screw-top jug of $9.99 red wine.
The open concept Coromandel Bach is a container home that reinterprets the New Zealand building tradition of crafting wood. Located on the North Island’s Coromandel Peninsula, this container house captures the beautiful simplicity of living with nature. Natural timber provides a seamless connection to its surroundings. Designed by Crosson Clarke Carnachan Architects, this unique holiday home can be easily boxed up when not in use. A simple mechanism opens the deck upon arrival. The house has a simple rectangular open plan that extends the interior space to the outside and the ocean beyond.
Manufactured with up to 70 percent recycled steel, the hybrid prefab Graham Residence by Blue Sky Building System limits construction waste to the factory, where it's recycled.
Purchasing a lot off the Delaware River in Pennsylvania, Martha Moseley and Bill Mathesius adapted an unused concrete foundation—remnants of its previous owner’s abandoned plans—to create a home that’s uniquely their own. “We were inspired by the site, and our desire to have something cool and different,” says Moseley.
Consisting of three prefabricated units in West Seattle on a 5,000 square-foot lot, the Genesee Townhomes—by Method Homes and Chris Pardo Design—from 1,250-1,400 square feet, each with three bedrooms and two and a half bathrooms.
This modular system created by the architects at Resolution: 4 allows them to customize a home’s floor plan by stacking, lining up, and joining factory-built, rectangular modules.
For her family’s house near Melbourne, Anna Horne created a series of prefab wood modules using a design from the company Prebuilt. She found the old industrial letter at a factory; it stands for Somerset, the name of the house.
Specializing in high-end, energy-efficient, modern homes, Cleveland–based evoDOMUS makes only custom designs, so you can rest assured that you’re not purchasing an off-the-shelf model.
Since 2005, Turkel Design has been creating prefabricated homes with a distinctly modern, contemporary design. Their Axiom series of prefab houses, launched in 2015, offers 11 distinct designs, starting at around $800,000.
Charred using the traditional Japanese wood preservation technique called shou sugi ban, the locally sourced cedar planks provide the home with a handsome, low-maintenance facade.
The tree canopy and sky peek through the clerestory windows of Bush House, whose form takes cues from California’s Case Study houses built during the ’40s through the ’60s.
The new addition opens the interiors to the garden.
Set on a gently slope hillside, the home lies parallel with the landscape, ideally situated to take advantage of panoramic views and solar gains.
Clad in natural materials, the residence is truly at home in the Pacific Northwest. Tall glazing provides a glimpse inside, with peeks of the elegant, spiral stair.
The wood-clad home sits between tall native grasses and dense foliage.
A refined, simple exterior palette of wood, stucco, and concrete allows the true architectural form to shine and blend in with the landscape.
Named the Tatami House, the houseboat resembles the size and layout of traditional Japanese tatami rooms. "We used the tatami as a grid for the house," explains Julius Taminiau, referring to how tatami—a rectangular straw mat typically measuring 35 by 70 inches—dictates the size and proportion of traditional Japanese spaces.
ICON's 3D-printed home is both a proof of concept, as well as an expression of 3D printing's capabilities to execute curved, unique designs.
Standing seam siding gives a durable exterior finish, with plywood panels adding warm accents.
Robertson restored the existing rooms in the front of the original house, and redesigned the back of the home to have a much more modern, indoor/outdoor living experience.
The front facade is an unassuming composition of dark-painted timber and privacy screening. "We thought about the idea of the house being like a quiet shadow in the foreground of the reserve," says the firm.
The home's dramatic eastern elevation asserts a more commanding presence with expansive glazing on both levels, boldly "opening up" to visitors and passersby.
Situated on a corner lot with two "front yards," the home is uniquely positioned to make distinctive statements from each street-facing vantage point. The home's southern entry features modest glazing and warm, cedar accents.

Zoom out for a look at the modern exterior. From your dream house, to cozy cabins, to loft-like apartments, to repurposed shipping containers, these stellar projects promise something for everyone. Explore a variety of building types with metal roofs, wood siding, gables, and everything in between.