34 Exterior Shipping Container House Metal Siding Material Design Photos And Ideas

M02 by HONOMOBO
Workshop and Golf Tees by Back Country Containers
160-square foot Writer's Shack by Montainer Homes
Happy Twogether by Custom Container Living
Grannis Road House by Ty Kelly
The container was brought to the property by truck, then the architectural team rented a small crane for around $250 a day to rotate it until they found the right spot for it to rest.
Purchasing a lot off the Delaware River in Pennsylvania, Martha Moseley and Bill Mathesius adapted an unused concrete foundation—remnants of its previous owner’s abandoned plans—to create a home that’s uniquely their own. “We were inspired by the site, and our desire to have something cool and different,” says Moseley.
Nine shipping containers form the basis of this new multigenerational house near Denver.
The two units in the duplex share a wall in the main house, so Rios continued the mirrored effect by placing the shipping containers side by side about 10 feet away from the home. Cut into the sides, the windows allow natural light to illuminate the shipping container and are designed to give parents a view of the kids playing in the backyard.
Rios asked architect Reynolds to derive a design from the shipping containers. The duplex takes the shape of stacked volumes clad with vertical and horizontal Hardie boards. The covered patio features clear-coated cedar wood.
The modular appearance of the duplex, clad in white Hardie plank siding, mimics the look of a two-story container home. With large windows and 11-foot-tall ceilings, the two-bedroom, three-bath residence feels more spacious than its 1,484 square feet. On the ground floor, the living, dining, and kitchen areas flow into one another; potential guests in the shipping container also have easy access to a full bath of their own. A steel-and-wood floating staircase leads to the second floor, which holds two bedrooms with patio access.
Recently featured in the pages of Dwell Magazine, this contemporary home is built from five reclaimed shipping containers and is set into a lush Santa Barbara hillside.
The home exterior was recently sandblasted and painted with a ship-grade, high-gloss industrial paint.
The 40-foot-long containers hang 16 feet over the ground. The deep balcony, Gooden says, offers solar protection, keeping strong sunlight out but letting natural light in.  The home has three bedrooms, a den, and three and half baths.
The site-built lower level, erected by Barber Builders, connects to the terrace via corner glass pocket doors.
Beautifully designed, these mobile structures are composed of high-quality materials at a more budget-friendly price, along with transportable, easy-to-assemble components.
The end elevation displays the shipping container structure and original doors.
A deck on the southside of the home is the perfect place to take in the ocean view.
One end of the home connects to the existing access path, which helped make construction to the site as minimal as possible. Edwards also positioned the property so that a studio space could be built below in the future.
The two ends of the containers can be opened or closed at this pivot for more or less privacy. Native plants will grow on the roof and northside of the structure.
Based in Wynwood, Florida, Wyn-Box constructed their model container home out of two used cargo containers. The 640-square-foot, one-bedroom showroom was designed by architects Ruslanas Byckovas and Ethan Royal with Ryan Anderson, a business developer, and boasts a stainless steel kitchen, porcelain gray tile, and a modern, clean gray exterior.
Functioning as a vacation rental for tourists, entrepreneur Rick Clegg combined old shipping containers to create a four-bedroom home with an eco twist near Palm Beach, Florida. Because of the container's inherent durability, they meet Florida's stringent construction standards, and the compactness of the home, the low carbon footprint because of the use of the recycled, prefabricated containers, and the home's proximity to the Loxahatchee River, make it ideal for ecotourists.
The front door to the units.
Three environmentally friendly container homes.
Franceschi Container Houses are three independent living units totaling 2,260-square-feet, built from used, 40-foot high cargo containers placed side by side.
One of the main draws of Kevin Freeman and Jen Feldmann’s house is its connection to the neighborhood, which is why the front porch was a must. “Homes that have a door but no outside space say, ‘I’m not interested in you,’” designer Christopher Robertson explains. “This says, ‘I’m here to be part of the community.’”
Alongside the redwood shade screen, which keeps the house from overheating, Freeman and Feldmann grow vegetables in an 18-inch-wide garden but frequently bike to nearby eateries for the local Mexican cuisine.
Poteet replaced one wall with a large steel-and-glass lift-and-slide window wall, which he says makes the best use of indirect light. “The big sliding door and picture window make the 250-square-foot living space feel big,” says Hill.

Zoom out for a look at the modern exterior. From your dream house, to cozy cabins, to loft-like apartments, to repurposed shipping containers, these stellar projects promise something for everyone. Explore a variety of building types with metal roofs, wood siding, gables, and everything in between.