303 Exterior House Building Type Metal Siding Material Design Photos And Ideas

The bedroom pavilion is mostly hidden, thanks to a massive native California oak—part of a grove. “That’s the good thing about oaks—they keep their leaves in the winter, so you don’t have one view in the summer and another in the winter,” Suzanne says.
More native grasses set the tone near the generously sized concrete pavers leading to the entrance. “We didn’t want the planting to feel like a country cottage garden—that would have felt disconnected with the view behind it,” Trainor says.
Butterfly House, designed by Feldman Architecture for David and Suzanne Rinaldo in California’s Monterey County, is made up of three discrete structures separated by walkways. The distinct folds in the roofs are utilized for rainwater catchment.
Mori’s addition is constructed of steel, concrete, glass, and bluestone veneer. She decided to preserve the ceiling height of the main house (11’6”) and lined the roof with Voltaic solar panels.
R128, Sobek’s family home (featured in Dwell’s May 2003 issue), is a groundbreaking example of green design with zero energy consumption, emissions, and waste.
Perforated steel panels provide a contrasting sense of roughness and lightness, which Oman played with throughout the home's design. The skin adds transparency and graphic energy to the exterior, though Oman did worry about people fixating on the tic-tac-toe element. "It's like calling a rectangular building the Tetris house," he says.
Resident Richard Kim, who works as the head of design at electric car company Faraday Future, tested his know-how with the creation of his own Los Angeles home, a curvilinear structure clad in Cor-Ten steel and black-stained cedar.
Originally conceived as a jewel box that would evoke precious objects and fine woodworking, Architect Natalie Donne envisioned, “a box covered with smooth and black material on the outside and blonde wood on the inside.” Large sheets of lustrous black fibrocement were assembled using fine rivets to form two connecting prisms, complete with large opening glass walls.
Meg Home | Olson Kundig
The front deck, invisible from the road, is an extension of the wood paneling in the main living space.
Referencing the motif in the kitchen, wood slats also appear on the rear facade of the home; the variegated cedar planks both modulate light and provide a bit of privacy (above).The garden floor, which accommodates an additional living area and office, also offers access to the backyard.
Says Kundig, “The clients are great parents and are always undertaking adventures as a mindful, deliberate way of developing memories as a family.”
Combining a prefab steel super-structure with concrete walls and insulated metal panels, Anthrazit House in Santa Barbara was designed by architects Pamela and Hector Magnus and built in collaboration with EcoSteel.
Yang Yeo and his girlfriend Ching Ian relax on the back stoop of their renovated and radically updated Singapore shophouse—an archetypal building type in this busy port city. “Shophouses brought back memories of our childhood,” says Yeo.
Inspired by the small scale of Japanese residences—in particular, Makoto Masuzawa’s 1952 Minimum House—architect Andrew Simpson designed his own economical 538-square-foot home, set into a wooded site in Island Bay, a coastal suburb outside Wellington, New Zealand.
Stephen Waddell and Isabel Kunigk worked with architect D’Arcy Jones to breathe new life into their “dank old” structure. The couple chose to sacrifice square footage inside in order to make the most of outdoor space.
This rain storage tank is a feature to be displayed at the entrance and not hidden away, as so often is the case. Sustainable infrastructure can be beautiful.
There was insufficient wood from the original house to do the large expanse of the west side of the Barn Gallery, so additional planks were sourced from a dismantled warehouse north of LA. As the wood naturally fades it blends with the wood from the original house. Corten steel frames the roof and walls.
The siding planks are from the floor joists of the original house; cut from trees on the property in 1970. They were carefully removed from the original house in 2014 and transported down the road to a neighbor’s saw mill, where they were resawn for use as the siding you see here; they are untreated and weathering naturally to what will become a beautiful silvery patina. That’s a small carbon footprint!

Recycled steel and metal artifacts are integrated into the design, complementing the reclaimed woods. The design echoes a barn on the adjoining property, but with a decidedly contemporary flavor. Guests comment both ways…… they love the modern design and they appreciate the design maintaining the local rural feel!
Overhangs around the perimeter help prevent interior heat buildup and glare.
When the residents of this weekend home in Carmel, California, approach the property, the house’s smart-tech systems prepare the dwelling for their arrival by turning on the heat and lights and opening the blinds. Wildlife are frequent visitors here, but the area’s active woodpeckers aren’t very welcome, so the house is clad in corrugated metal siding by Recla Metals.
Wein House - Besonías Almeida arquitectos
S&S House - Besonías Almeida arquitectos
S&S House - Besonías Almeida arquitectos
S&S House - Besonías Almeida arquitectos
“Everyone stops to look at the building,” says Motoshi. Neighbors may stare at the severe facade, but once inside they are amazed with the quality and comfort of his home. Its efficient design comes from IDEA Office’s clever rethink of local zoning regulations and required setbacks.
The creekside Fish Camp prototype rests on oversize flood-rated pylons, one of many foundation options the Camp units can accommodate.
South façade
McAvoy rebuilt the farmhouse’s original stone walls piece by piece. The couple found the sofa and ottoman at a local shop, Annie Mo’s. For the new structure, Grace & Webb fabricated a laser-cut steel balcony.
Cor-Ten steel from a ship building yard clads the new structure, which connects via a glass “bridge” to a rebuilt stone farmhouse containing the bedrooms.
Architect Andrew McAvoy created an earth-sheltered house in Scotland for Gavin and Angelique Robb and children Scarlett and Gus.
Eric Logan's guest house is adjacent to his family’s home. The interiors are made up of oiled masonite wall paneling, raw MDF cabinetry, and an oiled concrete floor.
Milton cracks open a window oriented to balance solar gain with a cooling stack effect.
The mezzanine’s double-hung Altherm window looksout on mature kohekohe and taraire trees.
Seeking a private escape from busy Auckland life, Milton Henry and Mark Summerville purchased an “unbuildable” lot on Waiheke Island and then rehabbed it over 15 years.A clearing in the bush dictated the footprint,resulting in two stacked volumes that form a tower-like structure over four split levels. It took a customized trailer to bring materials to the steep site.
East St. Paul, Manitoba
Dwell Magazine : November / December 2017
Twenty-two 12-foot-wide steel-frame modules were combined to form nine to 14-foot-high rooms that were stacked and bolted together. Ten deck modules added more than 4,700 square feet of sheltered outdoor space. Image courtesy of Jill Paider.
Tonko positioned the "lens" of the building to look over the Rhine Valley below. The owners have considered hanging some of the bronze sculptures outside the window, to allow them to develop a natural patina over time.
The structure is clad in weathered steel with an interior of concrete and untreated oak window frames. Tonko's design is meant to be what he describes as a "delicate workshop," an easy-to-clean, distraction-free space that allow for concentration and creativity.
Friends from Tonko's hometown of Bregenz, Austria, commissioned the studio when they acquired some land next to their home. They use it for drawing and sketching, as well as creating clay and gypsum sculptures that are later cast into bronze. Since the area is close to where he grew up, Tonko was incredibly familar with the view from the hillside.
Architect Christian Tonko played with a double metaphor when designing the Camera Lucida studio. The name of the cantileverd hillside space, Latin for "bright chamber," references the open window facing the valley below, as well as the skylight that bathes the workspace in natural light.
Timber battens were used on north-facing windows to prevent excessive heat in the summer. The exterior is clad in Scyon’s Linea weatherboard and covered in Dylux’s Western Myall paint. Beneath the upper floor, a little nook makes for the perfect covered carport and storage spot for surfboards.
The front entrance of the Farley Studio presents a clean, minimalist space—a stark contrast to the colorful clutter of the painting studio hidden behind corrugated-metal walls at the back of the house.

Zoom out for a look at the modern exterior. From your dream house, to cozy cabins, to loft-like apartments, to repurposed shipping containers, these stellar projects promise something for everyone. Explore a variety of building types with metal roofs, wood siding, gables, and everything in between.

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