376 Exterior House Stucco Siding Material Design Photos And Ideas

An outdoor shower on the rear gable of the house is used for rinsing off from the pool or after an outdoor excursion—or for a quick wash down for their two rescue dogs.
The home presents as a simple terrace cottage to the street, however it opens up to a surprising and textural collection of volumes inside. It steps down the gently sloping site toward the western garden, where stairs create small amphitheaters for sitting.
A sequence of steel beams and columns supporting the first-floor addition extend 1.5 meters from the home, creating an outdoor terrace beneath. Clear polycarbonate sheeting is installed between two of the beams, protecting the terrace from rain and sun.
Determining the structural integrity of the original brick dairy was paramount to the design of the new addition perched above. The existing brick walls, footings, and roof structure were all assessed, and steel features prominently in the extension to ensure stability.
The dairy is juxtaposed against the “modern industrial” extension, which is clad in Cemintel Barestone panels. The original facade and windows of the dairy bring a unique character to the project.
"The steel box protrudes enough to offer more privacy while also framing a great view of the oleander screen wall along the property line," says Darci.
The 1,000-square-foot bungalow sits along a quiet street near downtown Tucson and the University of Arizona. "For us, home isn’t simply about the space you live in; it’s also about the sense of belonging to a particular place," says Dale.
A light renovation connects this Sydney home with its lushly landscaped grounds.
The Coronado district near downtown Phoenix has an eclectic mix of home styles, ranging from 1930s Craftsman bungalows to modest brick colonials to small midcentury ranches. Lately, a growing number of glass-and-stucco minimalist newcomers are joining the mix—including several designed by Joel Contreras, a local real estate agent turned architectural designer whose family has lived in the area for five generations.
The 2,022-square-foot home has three bedrooms and three baths. The exterior facade was kept as is in the remodel.
Raimon Torres was the son of the pioneering modernist architect Josep Torres Clavé, who died during the Spanish Civil War. Born and educated in Barcelona, Torres followed his father’s example and went on to collaborate with Josep Lluís Sert and Erwin Broner, among others. In 1961, soon after graduating from architecture school, Torres moved to Ibiza and spent fifteen years living and working there as well as documenting the island and its buildings as a photographer, with its vernacular fincas serving as a key subject. Here, traditional materials and references splice with modern forms, as bare stone meets whitewashed concrete. The residence sits on a rugged hillside and faces the ocean, including a series of striking rock formations jutting out into the water.
White Fox Lodge has been described as John Schwerdt’s magnum opus. The architect trained in Brighton and worked largely in Sussex and the south of England, with heritage and conservation projects forming a key part of his portfolio. But he was also influenced by Modernist architecture—particularly, the more organic approach advocated and pioneered by Frank Lloyd Wright, whose work was a key point of reference in the evolution of White Fox Lodge. The floor plan of the single-story home adopts a pinwheel plan, as seen in the work of Richard Neutra and others.
Clarissa and Peter live in one of the units and plan to rent the second unit, which is almost a mirror image of the first.
Clarissa Nam and Peter McNeil of COMN Architects were able to attain homeownership and offset the majority of their expenses through sweat equity by subdividing their lot and building an additional house on the land.
The stucco-clad tiny home is punctuated by archways, including the arched entrance, and two courtyards—one of which peeks out from beneath the cantilevered front facade.
The pared-back approach of the remodel begins with the front entry, where horizontal bands of orange-toned cedar were replaced with a refined wood screen.
The Edgecliff Residence by Miró Rivera Architects is divided into three levels, with the guest quarters at ground level, living spaces on the second floor, and the master suite at the highest level.
Outdoor string lights help to bathe the adjacent courtyard in a soft glow.
Sundius and Ichiki sided the home with sand-colored stucco that ties to the other stucco-clad homes in the neighborhood.
The front, street-side view of the home reveals little about its true design.
Windsor Residence by Dick Clark + Associates
Windsor Residence by Dick Clark + Associates
Windsor Residence by Dick Clark + Associates
Throughout the day, the volume enclosed by the screen is alternately camouflaged and highlighted as the reflective metal responds to changes in the sun and sky. On a clear day, the shimmering screen provides a stark contrast to blue sky. But in the soft light of sunrise and sunset, the screen appears to dissolve.
A sliding door opens onto a large outdoor deck that is connected to the yard via a staircase with a plate steel stringer.
Below, the terrain falls away steeply to a public hike-and-bike trail before meeting the shores of Lady Bird Lake, itself a segment of the Colorado River that winds across the state of Texas.
Lago Vista by Dick Clark + Associates
Campo Loft is a blend of industrial architecture and the natural materials found in the surrounding valleys. It is a contemporary residence where contrast plays a large role—old and new, sleek and rustic, light and dark, rough and soft.
Located high up on a hill, Es Bec d'Aguila is a place to truly escape urban life by finding sanctuary in Menorca's rugged landscape.
Most of the year, the family keep the sliding glass doors—which span 16 feet from the living room to the exterior deck—of their Tampa dwelling open, giving it the aura of a Sarasota Modern home. Stunning cantilevered overhangs, in the spirit of Paul Rudolph's Umbrella House, help tame the sun.
The house as seen at dusk, with a day-lit basement tucked under the main floors with the help of a hillside site.
The home’s great room can easily extend onto the outdoor deck thanks to glass walls that slide away.
The finca was first built in the 19th century by a wealthy merchant family. Post-renovation, it retains its country charms.
The home’s namesake is a 26-foot-tall shade structure called a ramada. The name derives from the Spanish word for ‘branches,’ and it’s a regional construction technique mastered by the Tohono O'odha tribe. A total of 20 Douglas fir telephone poles support the 2 x 4 lattice canopy, which provides shade and casts dramatic shadows across the white, mortar-washed slump blocks.
The Hollywood Regency–style home sits almost exactly as Elrod left it. The oversized doors feature antique Moroccan brass door pulls made from a four-poster bed.
Stucco on the exterior keeps costs low and acts as a neutral backdrop for wood accents and drought-tolerant plants. The courtyard gate leads to the front door, which is out of street view.
Since Courtyard House is on a street that gets daily traffic from a nearby school, the home is protected by a concrete masonry wall that shields a courtyard, pool, and patio.
The home is a traditional, single-fronted Victorian terrace. The architects reinstated many of the original features that were missing from the front of the home before the renovation.
Located about 45 minutes from Hartford, Connecticut, and two hours north of New York City, the property's rural location offers ample privacy and solitude.
In order to create a small yet comfortable vacation home for a young couple, the multidisciplinary workshop TACO, or Taller de Arquitectura Contextual, sited it in the corner of a two-acre lot, then employed built-in elements for an "intuitive" interior layout.
The addition sits over the existing weatherboard cottage. One of the biggest challenges was getting the new roofline to run parallel with the old, as the home had shifted and settled over time.
The renovated exterior features fresh landscaping and hardscaping, along with new windows and doors.
Wijaya added a front wall and custom wood gates to provide privacy.
Marilyn Monroe is said to have stayed in the charming guesthouse.
Seen today, it’s hard to imagine that Jessy Moss and Steve Jocz’s glistening white home in Indian Wells, California, was marketed as a teardown only two years ago. Sparing it the wrecking ball, Jessy, an interior designer who used to be a singer/songwriter, and Steve, a realtor who was once a member of the band Sum 41, embarked on a restoration. During the project, they uncovered evidence that the home might be an unrecognized work by iconic architect William F. Cody. The circular pavers in the driveway, replicas of originals, are strikingly similar to those Cody used for another midcentury motor court.
Years of regrettable remodels had obscured the Guthrie House’s origins, but Marina and Avalon Rossi uncovered its roots and decided to restore the architect’s vision. After years of research, the Avi Ross Group initiated a 2019 renovation that would bring the house back to Frey’s original design intent and also instill standards of modern living. "We wanted it to look like a house dropped in the middle of the desert, which it was originally," says Avalon Rossi.
The family were drawn to the Spanish Colonial–style home’s charming exterior—which was not changed in the renovation.
With both an aging relative and a wheelchair user in mind, architect Neal Schwartz creates a family guesthouse designed to be accessible to all. Resident Elizabeth Twaddell enjoys the weather with her daughter Uma outside the guesthouse Schwartz designed for her mother-in-law, Surendra, who frequently visits for extended stays. A concrete driveway forks off from the main house to lead to a covered breezeway, sited between the new 775-square-foot structure and a two-car garage.
Clustered around a sunny courtyard, Three Piece House’s three volumes—a main house, comprising two volumes (one for living and the other for sleeping) connected via a sun-soaked reading corridor, and a free-standing guest studio—are oriented for optimal passive solar conditions, including access to cooling ocean breezes. Recycled brick paving ties the volumes together. Located in the garden, the studio accommodates visiting friends, family, and guests.
In Austin, Texas, this 1,100-square-foot accessory dwelling unit, called The Chelsea, splits a lot with the main house. The ADU responds to the lot by dodging the heritage trees to the north while creating a very spacious front yard. There is a garage that blocks a dogtrot and the living area of the house from the setting sun; the larger windows are concentrated on the northern side of the lot for plenty of natural lighting while reducing the heat gain in the summer and encouraging passive cross-ventilation.
Built in 1926, the Calori House rests on a rare flat shelf above the canyon floor in Glendale, California. After severe neglect, the historic residence was completely restored in 2016.
The original, irregularly placed openings remain.
Add/Subtract House by Matt Fajkus Architecture | Photo by Charles Davis Smith
Add/Subtract House by Matt Fajkus Architecture | Photo by Charles Davis Smith
Add/Subtract House by Matt Fajkus Architecture | Photo by Charles Davis Smith
The second floor houses a 900-square-foot apartment that can be kept separate from the main floor residence for rental purposes or can be connected via a door. "In what had been an attic for storing fan belts and auto supplies, we created a large open apartment with full bath and kitchen," says McCuen.
The town of Vail has enlisted 359 Design's help to produce 32 affordable housing units in the Chamonix Vail project. The modular homes come in five different types and are fabricated in Idaho before being shipped to the site.
“Everything was in fairly bad repair,” says Jessy Moss, recalling her first impression of seeing the 1961 post-and-beam home on Zillow. But one feature that caught her eye—and hinted to her that the house might be worth a visit—was the cluster of circular pavers that enlivened the driveway. Later, after she and her husband, Steve Jocz, bought the home, they had new concrete pavers laid in a similar pattern.

Zoom out for a look at the modern exterior. From your dream house, to cozy cabins, to loft-like apartments, to repurposed shipping containers, these stellar projects promise something for everyone. Explore a variety of building types with metal roofs, wood siding, gables, and everything in between.