342 Exterior House Gable Roofline Design Photos And Ideas

"Upon arrival, you enter straight off Abbott Kinney into a calm room where members check in,
The house has a standing-seam metal roof and  is finished with black-tinted stucco and a standing-seam metal roof.
The double-stacked wood wall from the exterior.
The wraparound deck boasts a view of the surroundings with shade provided by the eaves of the roof.
The  main house was given a contemporary look by way of a metal roof and a black exterior.
A view of the ascent towards the property.
The slightly trapezoidal shape of the site provides a rare opportunity for views down the coast from the interior of the house.
Strategically placed openings on all sides of the façade secure the ocean and hillside views, and provide maximal natural light to all interior spaces.
Corrosive sea air can deteriorate metals and slowly peel away paint, so the architects wrapped the building in aluminum and a non-corrosive metal, and coated it in a resilient rustproof paint.
The upper building was renovated to house the master suite and adjoining studio.
The smaller of the two existing buildings, this renovated structure houses two bedrooms. A glass overhang was installed above the passageway linking the historic structure with the concrete addition.
“The ‘new box’ on the site is made to be relatively inconspicuous,” say the architects of the boxy, concrete extension. “In the presence of the time-honored beauty of 70-year-old houses and the supreme natural landscape, any fresh elements seem unnecessary and charmless.”
Separated by an elevation difference of approximately 13 feet, the renovated structures are oriented towards views of the East China Sea.
Located in the fishing village of Agger on the northwest coast of Jutland, Woodhouse is the perfect base for hiking in Thy National Bike, mountain biking through the woods, horseback riding, windsurfing, fishing and more.
The site is located within the Australian bushland of Willoughby Council's Griffin Heritage Conservation Area, which added another level of complexity to the approvals process and design.
Recycled and repurposed items, such as salvaged bricks and a stainless steel bench from a commercial kitchen, have been used to create a low maintenance and sustainable home.
"We liked the idea of capturing the informality of a holiday place—nothing precious, all simple and practical," explain the architects.
Upcountry Maui Cottage and Barn
“The existing house was an important house in the heart of the historical district,” architect Robert Gurney said. To honor the property’s legacy, and fulfill the city’s requirements, the firm fully restored the exterior with cedar shingles.
The surrounding grounds were relandscaped to create even more privacy and garden views from the house and around the tennis court and pools.
Essentially, the entrance was kept in the same spot, with the chimney to the far right side.
A look at the contemporary facade post renovation. The new standing steel roof and siding of one of the wings references the cathedral spire in the village below.
Pederson was thrilled to be able to keep the home's floor-to-ceiling glass walls—a feature not possible with new construction because of the Title 24 restrictions.
The house is composed of three volumes, two of which come together at an angle to capture views of the surrounding landscape.
"Upon arrival, you enter straight off Abbott Kinney into a calm room where members check in," Sutherland says. "The interior is simple, elegant, and inviting."
Exterior view of master bedroom and master bath
Exterior view of main entry
A perpendicular wing houses the garage. The house has no air conditioning, relying on lake breezes and cross-ventilation for cooling. Each bedroom has a screened door that opens to the deck and an adjustable transom above the hallway door to encourage the circulation of air.
Taking cue from the original form of the chapel, NIKJOO's transformation brings new life and purpose to the building, while still respecting its remarkable past.
The tapered limestone chimney draws inspiration from an existing shed built of dry-stacked local stone.
"The porch’s distinctive 30-foot peak is discernible from a great distance, and its rhythmic, horizontal cypress slats are a contemporary interpretation of traditional vented gables," add the architects.
A waste-management plan has been developed to minimize, mitigate, and/or completely eliminate construction waste, while also properly disposing unused materials.
"Working within the restrictive budget, design was not sacrificed; rather, it inspired the team to find a vocabulary that was simple yet refined," adds the firm. "The exterior of the home is defined by clean lines, a sculptural gable roof, and a contrasting material palette of corrugated-aluminum and warm, locally sourced cypress. "
The historic site consists of an old farmhouse, stable, and shed, along with bunkers and artillery foundations from the both World War I and World War II. The stable has been converted into a modern 5,683-square-foot bed and breakfast establishment called The Bunkers.
Incisions made in the façade amplify the contrast between the red and yellow brickwork.
Streamlined sections of metal-framed windows with triple glazing stylishly connect the brick and wooden volumes.
For the farmhouse residence, the team has removed all the elements that did not have any significant heritage value. "Valuable historical constructions are thus brought into equilibrium with the scarcely added volumes," says Damiaan Vanhoutte, a co-founder of the firm.
The original farmhouse structure has been revamped into a 5,038-square-foot house for the owners of the B&B.
The gabled addition is topped with a standing seam metal roof and is clad in vertical corrugated metal siding.
A study is placed on the street-facing side of the addition.
"Stitching the existing white weatherboard cottage into its more robust industrial surrounds, the new addition uses brick work painted white at the first level to connect to the white weatherboard and then black at the top level to engage with the local industrial precinct," say the architects.
"Stitching the existing white weatherboard cottage into its more robust industrial surrounds, the new addition uses brick work painted white at the first level to connect to the white weatherboard and then black at the top level to engage with the local industrial precinct," say the architects.
Each prefabricated unit is covered in aluminum but built from SIPS (Structurally Insulated Panels) that consist of thick insulation sandwiched between plywood panels. These high-performance panels keep the interior protected from the desert's ambient heat.
"The gabled forms embrace the context of the surrounding post-war weatherboard houses, and the white polycarbonate directly references the white weatherboards of the dwelling to the north," say the architects.
From this angle, all three buildings can be seen, two of which are clad in wood. The foremost building is wrapped in white polycarbonate.
Constructed with wood and Perspex acrylic glass, this semi-transparent volume extends from the side of the main house, blurring the boundaries between indoors and outdoors.
This creates the appearance of a singular gabled house with opaque walls on one side and transparent walls on the other.
The width of the greenhouse volume is equal to the width of the enclosed  volume. "The greenhouse portion and the residential portion are structurally independent while complementing each other's functions," says Snark architectural director Yu Yamada, "enabling expansion, reduction, and renewal of the greenhouse section in the future."
The home is accessed from the west, where the garage is hidden behind a charred timber door.
The master bedroom overlooks the landscape through a glazed gable wall, which is shaded with a deep overhang.
The gutter is concealed to preserve the home’s minimalist appearance.
Large windows and terraces connect the home to the outdoors.
Scott and Lauren plan to track the energy use of their new-build’s electric equipment and appliances. The data will inform the size of their photovoltaic array they'll add to offset the energy costs of the ADU and the bungalow.
The FSC-certified Western Red Cedar siding, supplied by Sustainable Northwest Wood, was lightened and will develop a darkened patina over time.
Scott and Lauren’s compact backyard home is located in the back half of their 5,000-square-foot lot in the Richmond neighborhood of Southeast Portland.

Zoom out for a look at the modern exterior. From your dream house, to cozy cabins, to loft-like apartments, to repurposed shipping containers, these stellar projects promise something for everyone. Explore a variety of building types with metal roofs, wood siding, gables, and everything in between.