283 Exterior House Gable Roofline Design Photos And Ideas

The back deck provides the perfect spot for entertaining and enjoying the lush landscape.
The wood and stucco addition features a pitched metal roof that complements the existing home's midcentury style. The hidden side windows (by the planter) allow natural light to filter in.
The first task at hand was to open up and vault the ceilings. The architects added floor-to-ceiling windows, which allowed the home to take full advantage of its amazing views.
Lovely lines and heaps of character make this midcentury property a true gem.
The sheet metal roof and wood cladding of the new structure complements the smooth, shiny birch tree barks on the site.
In winter, the extension looks as if it’s covered in snow.
The ribbed texture of the facade echoes the whitewashed walls of the area’s rural barns.
The new addition consists of a white prism that rests atop a concrete pedestal.
The wood was simply stained and left in its natural state, and reduced the need for more costly structural steel.
All windows and doors have been custom-designed and fitted with aluminum framing.
Given the simplicity of the house’s brick façade—a seven-foot brick base with a massive gabled roof on top—the complex spatial geometry of the interiors comes as a surprise to visitors.
The owner—a ceramics artist—wanted to make the best of the topography of the lot, and also requested views of the site's nearby horse arena.
Here is the lovely home at dusk.
The cedar shingles—common to local buildings—are scaled up to the size of the boards to cover the roof and sidewalls.
Each structure has an independent mechanical system so it can be shut down when not in use.
As with connected farms, the limited material palette unifies the various spaces.
The separate volumes are unified in their external appearance.
From the courtyard, views extend straight through the home to the other side of the structure.
To instill the desired sense of comfort and peace, it was important that the design blend with the setting and local building traditions.
The glazing faces the lake, providing privacy from the road.
The first-floor cantilevers out and is perched like a platform, serving as a great viewpoint for observing the surrounding forest scenery.
Rather than create a typical two-story home, the architects have designed a multi-layered space with a series of platforms.
Tina and Matthew Ford, here with daughter Daisy, are the owners of Shade House Development, the company that designed and is building the suite of houses that comprise Row on 25th in Houston, Texas.
“Floating Farmhouse” in Eldred New York is a modern five-room holiday rental home with a touch of old world charm.
For the roof, Andersson opted for tiles and plates made of galvanized steel sheets.
The home is sited on a flat expanse of farmland. When the current owner, Jonathan Andersson, first purchased the property, he hired a team of carpenters, plumbers, and electricians, and spent 14 months renovating. He and his team excavated around two feet of ground under the home and laid down drainage materials, cellular plastic, reinforcement, and a floor-heating hose before filling the areas with concrete.
The barns—officially known now as Tunby 3209—were originally built in 1901.
Sliding glass doors allow the kitchen and living room to be fully opened to the deck, creating a seamless integration between the interior and exterior space.
The home is made up of four gabled forms: the main house—with an attached master bedroom suite in its own distinct volume (on the left)—an artist studio, and an attached three-car garage.
The building consists of two floors with two residential units occupying each floor. The family owned one of the units on the upper floor.
Renowned designer and architect Jens Risom sourced parts from a catalog for his customized A-frame and had them delivered in pieces to his remote island site off Rhode Island, helped to raise the aesthetic profile of modular construction.
“There’s a presence to that place—it’s vast, and constantly shifting,” Moffitt says. “It was clear that this house should be an observation shed for the changing landscape beyond.”
When Jennifer and Mattias Segerholt decided to move to Portland after five years in Los Angeles, a shared climate-based trepidation shaped their real estate search.
The pinwheel plan also led to the creation of two sheltered outdoor spaces: the morning porch and the evening porch.
Planning regulations required a gable roof, which the architects split into four shed roofs carefully designed to respond to heavy snow and meet spatial and aesthetic wishes.
During the winter, the Youngs go on long ski tours and warm up in the sauna.
In summer, the cabin makes an excellent base for mountain biking, canoeing, kayaking, and fishing.
Located on the northern edges of the Nordmarka wilderness region, Mylla Cabin offers easy access to cross-country skiing, as well as fishing at Mylla Lake located just below.
Planning regulations required a gable roof, which the architects split into four shed roofs carefully designed to respond to heavy snow shed and meet spatial and aesthetic wishes.
On the northwestern tip of Scotland’s Isle of Skye is a vacation rental that's inspired by the region’s traditional “crofter style” cottages, but covered with a skin of tin.  
Designed and built by Gill Smith and Alan Dickson of Scottish practice Rural Design Architects, this house sits along the rugged Isle of Skye coast and has a rudimentary form that recalls children’s drawings of pitched-roof homes.  
Smith and Dickson constructed the house using corrugated metal sheeting, which is commonly used for agricultural sheds or
“I wanted to do a house that belonged on the site,” she says.
Waechter Architecture reimagined a traditional gabled home in southeast Portland without significantly altering the original building. A simple coat of red paint abstracts the century-old structure, creating a residential work of art.
“Who better than the farmer and the farmer's family to know how most effectively and easily to find efficiency?” says architect Alan Barlis. Regional architecture inspired the barn-life structure of the house, an open volume that aides in efficient heating and cooling of the space.
The north wall of the IST home functions as a cut-away, offering a peek inside an efficient yet cozy dwelling. Architect Peter Jurkovič built the home for a woman who had sold her flat in the big city of Bratislava and wanted something that reminded her of the village life of her childhood.
The Floating Farmhouse’s semitransparent addition has a roofline that matches the pitch of the original 1820s farmhouse. A porch, tucked under the side eaves, is cantilevered over a stream that runs through the property. Ikea loungers are illuminated from the interior by commercial gymnasium lights repurposed as pendant lamps.
With invisible foundations, the house appears to hover above a grassy carpet.
"With the Junsei House, designing for sustainability was not only about material choices or products, but rather about shifting one's attitude and explaining how essential design elements can alter the living habits of occupants," states Suyama.
To help keep costs at bay, the dark exterior siding and feature staircase were constructed of fir plywood.

Zoom out for a look at the modern exterior. From your dream house, to cozy cabins, to loft-like apartments, to repurposed shipping containers, these stellar projects promise something for everyone. Explore a variety of building types with metal roofs, wood siding, gables, and everything in between.