492 Exterior House Gable Roofline Design Photos And Ideas

3767 Barrington Drive features a classic Eichler profile and an inviting bright orange front door.
“Even when the Kirio system is not connected to the router, it’s constantly downloading information about energy usage.” —Tiffany Bowie, architect
Choosing not to make a big to-do of itself, this cottage blends in with its surroundings. A wall of glass on one end allows a merger of the outdoors with the interiors, while white trim leaves the appearance of a snow-kissed façade year-round. Berlin, Germany. By Atelier st Gesellschaft von Architekten mbH

from the book Rock the Shack, Copyright Gestalten 2013.
According to Remijnse, since the only direction they could build on the small site was up, they decided to add height with a gabled roof.
The solar panels on the roof often get covered in a heavy layer of snow, but with periodic clearing, they are as effective during the sunny days of winter as they are during fairer weather.
The architects reused and enlarged the steel frame and ground slab to preserve the shed’s original form while cladding the structure in new materials sympathetic to the rural vernacular.
The building is clad in horizontal shot-blasted larch boards and vertically oriented galvanized steel fins. The cladding varies in height and width to create a patterned facade.
Walls of glass run up the east and west sides of the house, blurring the boundary between indoors and out.
The sedum green roof by Skygarden helps to manage stormwater.
A bright-yellow “R” sign, from a truck that used to deliver furniture from Jens Risom Design, sets off the southern facade. When Jens designed the house, he stipulated that he wanted cedar shingles, not the asphalt ones that came with the original design from the catalog.
On the north-facing facade, it’s easy to discern where the original glass doors used to open directly to the deck. In spring of 2012, Block Island contractor John Spier replaced the entire wall of glass panels.
Originally, glass doors opened to the deck, but after years of gusty winds, it was decided that a side entrance, protected by a sliding steel door, would be the preferred entrance.
Mid-century designer Jens Risom's A-framed prefab family retreat, located on the northern portion of Block island, is bordered by a low stone wall, an aesthetic element that appears throughout the land.
Designers Russell Pinch and Oona Bannon kept many of the architectural details of the 300-year-old cow barn they turned into a second home, including its terra-cotta roof tiles. The primary structural change took place on the front facade, which they tore down and rebuilt, opening space for a traditional oeil-de-boeuf window. The door on the left opens to a workshop. In addition to designing furniture, the couple also create interiors for select clients.
A look at the lovely nature-filled backyard.
In order to maximize space, the architects utilized a split-level design that includes the living areas on the main level, two upstairs bedrooms, and a walk-out basement beneath the dining room. The wood siding was salvaged and restored from the previous building on-site, in order to bring warmth to the gray, seamed metal and reference the neighborhood's past.
A strip of clerestory windows brings in lots of natural light to the living room, while their high sills encourage privacy from the lane.
The home is composed of limestone masonry and structural steel accents.
Designed by architect Tanja Rytkönen, Vista is a compact log home with a high pitched roof, and fully glazed façade.
Designed by architects and experienced sailor Kari Leppänen, Honka’s Saari villa was built with 134-milimeter thick square logs treated with a dark finish, and has three-meter wide eaves that provide shade, and wind protection for the outdoor patio.
This house has a sauna and four bedrooms, including a master bedroom on the second level that looks down onto the lake.
A Honka model called Kommodori was used for this seaside home,
Guest House - view to Main House
Main House
In the Dolomite mountains, an angular copper-clad apartment building echoes the topography of its site. Photos by Hertha Hurnaus
This dwelling joins a number of structures—such as a boathouse and guesthouse—owned by one family and used for vacations. They needed a new house to accommodate new generations at the reatreat.
The father of architect Greg Dutton wished to build a cabin on the family farm, located within Appalachian Ohio and home to 400 heads of cattle. Dutton, of Pittsburgh and Columbus, Ohio-based Midland Architecture, presented this design as his father’s birthday present in 2012. Finished in 2014, the 900-square-foot cabin operates entirely off-the-grid.
“I wanted more of a skeletal look for this house, and less of a chunky, log-cabin look,” says Panton, who added stark steel bracing across the entire length of the porch’s roof structure.
Nice modern cabin
The sleeping cabin perches on a rocky rise near the Floating House; Meredith imagines these two as a start of a string of buildings that will wrap around the island.
Building atop the foundation of a previous greenhouse was a cost-cutting measure; it allowed the project to be considered a renovation and thereby qualify for a temporary tax reduction. Its traditional, gabled form also pays homage to the original structure.
Exposed steel, concrete soffits, and cement-washed bricks were been chosen as key components of the home due to the materials having low-maintenance, yet being extremely durable.
Classic post-and-beam construction and a bright orange door create a sunny facade for this updated Orange County Eichler.
The exterior of The Great Barn.
"The large, overhanging patio and timber shutters assist in eliminating unwanted afternoon sun. The remainder of spaces remain oriented north, with optimal overhangs to ensure climate comfort throughout seasons," explains Engelbrecht.
Warm tones of timber combined with polished concrete floors and industrial-style cabinetry give the interiors a modern, paired-back look.
There are two nearby dams on the farmland that provide drinking water for the off-grid home.
The expansive property from above.
The garage door was replaced with a new entry to the building, featuring a custom steel canopy over the front door. The door is painted Benjamin Moore Flamingo's Dream to better contrast with the black-stained, tight-knot vertical cedar siding.
The architects worked with the natural, six-foot slope of the site and built the Granny Pad into the hill to gain the needed interior height. The volume on the right is the original garage footprint, which now houses a kitchen and sitting room. The added volume on the left hosts the bedroom, as well as a bathroom beneath the loft space.
The architects expanded the building to a total of 571 square feet. The rear entry, shown here, accesses a loft space that is currently used for storage. In the future, the loft might become an office or additional sleeping quarters, depending on the homeowners' needs.
The new homes complement the existing residential scale in this downtown Orlando neighborhood.
The exterior of the Aspire House is built of concrete blocks with a Portland cement plaster (stucco) finish.
The entrance door is made of mirror-like glass to enhance privacy.
The gaps in the brickwork naturally brighten the interiors.
The gaps between the courses also allow the brick wall to double as a window, framing views and drawing in more light and air.
The traditional bricklaying technique enabled the second-level interior space to become larger.
From the garden level, a staircase leads up to the protected courtyard where the entrance door is located.
The garden "basement" level houses two guest rooms, a sauna, and a bathroom.
Concrete and wood create a two-toned exterior.
Australian spotted gum wood was used for sections of the exterior wall.
Tim Sharpe and Rani Blancpain wanted a home that would allow them to enjoy an indoor-outdoor lifestyle.
The well-preserved midcentury home sits on a half-acre lot near the Knollwood Country Club in Granada Hills. The lot features a gorgeous outdoor space that includes a sprawling lawn, a covered patio, and a swimming pool and spa.
The outdoor space has been landscaped with synthetic turf, as well as drought-tolerant plants.
This dark-blue 1907 home appears to be typical of the Victorian character that was evident in early 1900's residential architecture. Unbeknownst from the outside are the bright, light-filled interiors and modern interventions.

Zoom out for a look at the modern exterior. From your dream house, to cozy cabins, to loft-like apartments, to repurposed shipping containers, these stellar projects promise something for everyone. Explore a variety of building types with metal roofs, wood siding, gables, and everything in between.