125 Exterior Beach House House Design Photos And Ideas

A peek at the surrounding lush landscape.
Materials used for the exterior include stucco, wood, metal, and concrete.
A large deck coated with Cetol finish from Behr extends into the home’s sloped site.
The mix of cedar and stone help integrate the dwelling into its natural setting.
The home cantilevers out over the series of stone-retaining walls.
The first floor is made up of glass walls that allow the site to appear to remain uninterrupted.
The East Lake House.
The overall rustic exterior is juxtaposed against a modern entry with a sleek profile.
The two buildings are positioned to maximize the views and capture the summer sun and breezes.
As its name suggests, the house rests upon wooden stilts, which passively cools the interiors.
LOHA’s design is a result of new code requirements and creatively working within limitations so that the project would successfully maximize the site potential.
Standing-seam siding folds up from the street façade over the roofline to the roof deck, creating a seamless transition between wall and roof.
The unfinished cedar planks will develope a silvery patina over time.
Working within a tight footprint due to building restrictions, the two-story main building includes most of the bedrooms and communal spaces, with guest quarters placed in a separate structure.
On one side of the home is a boardwalk that runs alongside verdant tropical plants. This boardwalk takes residence from the interior of the house, and goes out to the rainforest.
Located near a national park and white sand beaches in the quaint area of Little Cove, this 6,997-square-foot retreat features four bedrooms and three bathrooms.
The home overlooks its own private sauna and slice of beach.
The home is carefully placed on the mountainside in order to have minimal impact on its hillside location. Posts were used to help preserve the surrounding nature as much as possible.
Tall, slender teak trunks are secured to the ground with the weight of adobe bricks—a material that’s commonly used in the area—to support the walls and roof.
The communal area is fitted with wooden sliding doors, which open to connect the space seamlessly with the surrounding garden.
The slightly trapezoidal shape of the site provides a rare opportunity for views down the coast from the interior of the house.
Strategically placed openings on all sides of the façade secure the ocean and hillside views, and provide maximal natural light to all interior spaces.
Corrosive sea air can deteriorate metals and slowly peel away paint, so the architects wrapped the building in aluminum and a non-corrosive metal, and coated it in a resilient rustproof paint.
The exterior of the home is layered for privacy and shade. Alaskan cedar siding adds an elegant and dramatic modern touch.
The distinctively designed property has a strong connection with its surroundings. Glass-enclosed bridges join the towers, and sliding glass doors seamlessly connect with the outdoor space.
The upper level of the home features a large family room, two guest suites, and a master wing that faces the pond and ocean.
The surrounding grounds were relandscaped to create even more privacy and garden views from the house and around the tennis court and pools.
Essentially, the entrance was kept in the same spot, with the chimney to the far right side.
The boxy, contemporary new facade was completely restructured.
Custom rosewood gates and privacy screens at the street entrance. Unsealed, these will grey naturally over time.
Wein House - Besonías Almeida arquitectos
Wein House - Besonías Almeida arquitectos
Wein House - Besonías Almeida arquitectos
Wein House - Besonías Almeida arquitectos
A sneak peak.
Stone and concrete.
The exterior of the home is clad in charred wood siding, which pays homage to summertime bonfires on the beach.
Here is a look at the colors of the beach at dusk against the charred timber exterior.
Materials such as sand, stone, and driftwood have been inspired by the lakefront site.
This exterior deck is partially closed and is oriented to take advantage of lakeside vistas. It also allows sunlight into the study and master suite.
"The gabled forms embrace the context of the surrounding post-war weatherboard houses, and the white polycarbonate directly references the white weatherboards of the dwelling to the north," say the architects.
From this angle, all three buildings can be seen, two of which are clad in wood. The foremost building is wrapped in white polycarbonate.
Here is the lovely home at dusk.
The cedar shingles—common to local buildings—are scaled up to the size of the boards to cover the roof and sidewalls.
Each structure has an independent mechanical system so it can be shut down when not in use.
As with connected farms, the limited material palette unifies the various spaces.

Zoom out for a look at the modern exterior. From your dream house, to cozy cabins, to loft-like apartments, to repurposed shipping containers, these stellar projects promise something for everyone. Explore a variety of building types with metal roofs, wood siding, gables, and everything in between.