326 Exterior Beach House Design Photos And Ideas

At the Modern Surf Shack, pandemic food delivery can be an adventure.
The concrete also bears a patina that helps mitigate its preciousness in an otherwise humble beach town.
Homeowner and surfer Christopher Hansen envisions a secluded oceanfront retreat that lets him keep an eye on the waves.
The new cedar will age naturally, gaining a silver patina over time. The garage was refaced with stucco.
Some windows that were salvageable were kept, while others were replaced with new Jeld-Wen units that Jocie liked better for their size, shape, or function. At the corner of the sunroom, for example, an angular corner window looks much cleaner than the two units that had been there before.
The architect streamlined the exterior by replacing the shingles with tongue-and-groove Eastern white cedar boards, grown and milled in Maine.
Completed in fall 2020, the modern residence balances its delicate location with near energy independence—powered by solar panels and a clever design.
Located in Westhampton Beach on New York’s Long Island, this recently built home by Josh Manes Architecture is surrounded by preserved wetlands. The house is powered by a solar array on the rooftop while expansive windows, along with cantilevers and recessed sections, address solar heat gains.
Cutouts at the roofline demarcate the decks.
The design team treated the cedar siding with a product to give it a silvery patina that suited the neighborhood context, and anodized aluminum windows and doors match the standing-seam roof. “The design captures the spirit of this eclectic and evolving neighborhood, exhibiting both contemporary clean and straight lines but also a gable roof and cedar siding reminiscent of a traditional cottage feeling and material—something to reclaim the beachy character of the neighborhood,” says Saez Pedraja.
The front courtyard extends the living space off the kitchen, and connects the home to the neighborhood.
Saez Pedraja Architecture designed a two-bedroom, 1,600-square-foot home on a narrow city lot in the Ocean Park neighborhood of Santa Monica.
On a rustic strip of coastline near Puerto Escondido, Mexico, S-AR designed a beach getaway with an open concrete grid that frames its natural surroundings.
"By replacing the low-value, original garage and workshop, space was created within the original building envelope to create a three-bed, one-bath guest wing above," says DFJ Architects. This new wing is on the same level as the main residence and "is keyed into the existing roof pitch," so it fits seamlessly into the neighborhood.
“An angled entry clad in white brick addresses the angle of the street and provides a place to pause before entering into the home,” says the firm.
This neighborhood in Whitefish, Montana used to be the grounds of a summer camp. “This was the last lot that had one of those original buildings, and it was the check-in office, which had been converted to a triplex,” says George. The clients own a custom snowboard and wakeboard company, and they wanted to “keep that camper, tree house–type feel with the massing” of the new house.
The exposed concrete framework cantilevers dramatically from the stone walls.
"In a sense, we treated earth as one of our materials," says Vaitsos. "We figured out how much earth we needed to excavate in order to position this house here. And then we used it to transform the landscape a little bit." This was done to create as little waste as possible.
Each cell denotes a different area inside the house below it and is planted with a different species of aromatic plant from which essential oils can be extracted. The landscaped roof also helps to insulate the home and blend it into the environment.
The circular insertions are custom operable skylights that allow for daylighting and passive cooling.
The Orchard Corral is just below the house, and is home to a large grove of olive trees for olive oil and white wine production. Many of the island restaurants serve the olive oil.
"We work with the human body and mind in the center, and around it we build on the site and the cultural heritage of the environment around it," explains Sundberg of his approach to design. "This is more important than any kind of abstract constructs. Architecture is about emotional belonging, about the functions of the body and the mind, about what kind of social and emotional space we want our clients to be set into. This project is about these themes."
Sundberg used materials, which include concrete and zinc in addition to larch, that were as close to their natural and untreated form as possible. "It is the right thing to do here," he says. "We don't want our design to pretend to be something it is not."
The front and sides of the home feature a wide board-and-batten larch cladding to add depth and allow for a variation of shadows throughout the day.
Siberian larch is the primary facade material. It's finished with a silicon-based protective treatment to allow the wood to weather more evenly.
Sundberg designed the home as a simple box so it would "subordinate itself" to the sandy landscape of birch trees and sea grasses.
Swedish architect Johan Sundberg designed this three-bedroom home in the southern Skåne region for a family of four. The parents grew up in the area, but they now live in Boston.
After finding paradise on a Hawaiian papaya farm, filmmaker Jess Bianchi and jewelry designer Malia Grace Mau tapped San Francisco artist Jay Nelson to design and build their dream home in just five weeks. Located just one block from the beach, the home takes inspiration from laid-back surf shacks and is mainly built with reclaimed wood.
A generously-sized, comfortable deck lines the water side of the cabin.
The “River Cabaan” is just steps away from the Wilson River and a 80-minute drive from Portland, Oregon.
The material is in stark contrast to the rough-hewn walls of the original stone structure.
When renovating a centuries-old beach cottage in Cornwall, architect Adam Casey of Watershedd covered one of the existing additions in vertical black timber.
“Corey’s idea of decoupling the boxes into separate units meant we could play with how far forward or back each one was,” says resident Gabrielle Chamberlain.
The cladding is triple-stained black cedar shiplap. The doors and windows are by Andersen.
A multi-gabled house designed by architect Corey Yurkovich for a couple and their longtime friend sits amid beech trees, cattails, and seagrasses on New York’s Shelter Island.
“We proposed a rule in the beginning that the architects would have complete liberty in their design,” says resident Claudio Sodi.
Aranza de Ariño and Claudio Sodi gave the architects at S-AR carte blanche to design their 850-square-foot beach retreat.
Landscaping from Piazza Horticultural surrounds relaxed outdoor hangout spots.
A private outdoor shower is located at ground level, for easy access from the beach.
The team relocated the staircase so it doesn’t break up the facade.
Clapboard siding was swapped out for narrow horizontal strips of Meranti wood, and the garage now has barn-style swing doors that fit into the facade.
The bay window was squared off, and the cupola was rebuilt so that the scale works better with the massing of the building.
Oasis Tiny House, clad in teal-painted plywood and a metal roof that's pitched in the front and curved in the rear, was designed and built by Ellie and Dan Madsen of Paradise Tiny Homes in Keaau, Hawaii.
The Portage Bay Residence is a streamlined home that enjoys lake views and total privacy. The garage melds into the industrial, flat exterior, which resembles maritime sheds found throughout the area.
Making maximum use of a tight footprint, architect Robert Sweet designed a two-story home in Hermosa Beach that provides plenty of flexible indoor/outdoor space for residents Anton and Mardi Watts and their children.
"The placement of the stacked boxes and the space between them has been treated in a sculptural way—always considering the functional needs of habitability and the beauty of the house," explains Estudio Caballero Colón.
Casey Brown Architecture designed the Hart House, a modern update to the one-room Australian beach shack that overlooks Great Mackerel Beach. The contemporary home mimics the shack vernacular with its simple, boxy construction that’s wrapped in a protective shell of corrugated metal.
Nestled on a crescent-shaped surf beach on South Island’s Banks Peninsula sits a deceptively simple beach house. Scrubby Bay is a rustic retreat flush with modern luxuries and breathtaking scenery at every turn.
Accessible via helicopter or a 40-minute 4x4 ride overtop clifftop farm tracks, Scrubby Bay offers a remote slice of paradise on a working coastal farm.
Perched quietly on the dunes of New Zealand’s Coromandel Peninsula, Hut on Sleds serves as a small, sustainable beach retreat for a family of five.
In addition to the workshop, the ground level holds an outdoor shower with easy beach access, a beach equipment storage closet, and a seasonal half bath.
RES4’s modular approach provides a Brooklyn family with a beautiful weatherproof retreat on Long Island. Designed as a hybrid between a double-wide and a courtyard house, the 1,650-square-foot North Fork Bay House was prefabricated off-site as two modules. In addition to time and cost savings, prefabrication helped address the restricted building site, which has a very long and narrow footprint limited by FEMA setback regulations and zoning laws.
Rudolph used red cannonballs as weights to hold the home’s signature wood shutters in place.
The home also features a narrow, in-ground swimming pool which is illuminated at night.
The boxes are stacked at angles to frame distinct views.

Zoom out for a look at the modern exterior. From your dream house, to cozy cabins, to loft-like apartments, to repurposed shipping containers, these stellar projects promise something for everyone. Explore a variety of building types with metal roofs, wood siding, gables, and everything in between.