177 Exterior Beach House Design Photos And Ideas

Perforated Equitone shading boards on the home's street-facing facade provide visual interest and encourage privacy.
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Costa Nativa designed and executed the surrounding landscaping, paying respect to the topography and integrating only native flora.
A person shows the grand scale of the structure.
An imposing terrace appears to be suspended above the ravine.
Two of the weathered concrete volumes lean against each other like building blocks. The main volume is spread over four levels.
The hillside home is distributed over four levels.
The Inlet House exterior is marked by cedar shingle wood siding and ample glazing that emphasizes the views and the feeling of living in a wildlife sanctuary.
A peek at the surrounding lush landscape.
Materials used for the exterior include stucco, wood, metal, and concrete.
A large deck coated with Cetol finish from Behr extends into the home’s sloped site.
The mix of cedar and stone help integrate the dwelling into its natural setting.
The home cantilevers out over the series of stone-retaining walls.
The first floor is made up of glass walls that allow the site to appear to remain uninterrupted.
The East Lake House.
The overall rustic exterior is juxtaposed against a modern entry with a sleek profile.
The two buildings are positioned to maximize the views and capture the summer sun and breezes.
As its name suggests, the house rests upon wooden stilts, which passively cools the interiors.
LOHA’s design is a result of new code requirements and creatively working within limitations so that the project would successfully maximize the site potential.
Standing-seam siding folds up from the street façade over the roofline to the roof deck, creating a seamless transition between wall and roof.
The unfinished cedar planks will develope a silvery patina over time.
Working within a tight footprint due to building restrictions, the two-story main building includes most of the bedrooms and communal spaces, with guest quarters placed in a separate structure.
On one side of the home is a boardwalk that runs alongside verdant tropical plants. This boardwalk takes residence from the interior of the house, and goes out to the rainforest.
Located near a national park and white sand beaches in the quaint area of Little Cove, this 6,997-square-foot retreat features four bedrooms and three bathrooms.
The home overlooks its own private sauna and slice of beach.
The home is carefully placed on the mountainside in order to have minimal impact on its hillside location. Posts were used to help preserve the surrounding nature as much as possible.
Tall, slender teak trunks are secured to the ground with the weight of adobe bricks—a material that’s commonly used in the area—to support the walls and roof.
The communal area is fitted with wooden sliding doors, which open to connect the space seamlessly with the surrounding garden.
The separate volume complements the design of the main house, yet with more of a tropical, modern feel.
The slightly trapezoidal shape of the site provides a rare opportunity for views down the coast from the interior of the house.
Strategically placed openings on all sides of the façade secure the ocean and hillside views, and provide maximal natural light to all interior spaces.
Corrosive sea air can deteriorate metals and slowly peel away paint, so the architects wrapped the building in aluminum and a non-corrosive metal, and coated it in a resilient rustproof paint.
The exterior of the home is layered for privacy and shade. Alaskan cedar siding adds an elegant and dramatic modern touch.
The distinctively designed property has a strong connection with its surroundings. Glass-enclosed bridges join the towers, and sliding glass doors seamlessly connect with the outdoor space.

Zoom out for a look at the modern exterior. From your dream house, to cozy cabins, to loft-like apartments, to repurposed shipping containers, these stellar projects promise something for everyone. Explore a variety of building types with metal roofs, wood siding, gables, and everything in between.