67 Dining Room Concrete Floors Table Storage Design Photos And Ideas

Where they could reuse original fittings and fixtures, they did, painting Bakelite handles and repurposing industrial, warehouse-style pendants found on-site. “We used whatever we could, and didn’t throw things out. Even the front door that was being thrown out by the neighbor next door (who was also renovating), Rose saved.” says Szczerbicki.
The open dining area sits between the living room and the kitchen, and it can be closed off to the entry hallway via a sliding door.
The house is largely furnished with pieces already owned by the couple, including the Eames Wire Chair DKR with Eiffel base used around the dining table. “The furniture all works together to create an eclectic mix,” says designer Jamie Chioco.
The red paint was stripped off the built-in and the hardware updated, while the counter was kept.
A coat of Dunn Edwards White brightens up the spaces now. A table from Henrybuilt is surrounded by Eames chairs and sits atop a rug from Nordic Knots. The pendant light is Gerald Thurston for Lightolier and was purchased at a local vintage store called the Sunshine Shop.
Lago Vista by Dick Clark + Associates
Inside, a grand central hall retains much of the original barn-like interior. The original redwood paneling lines the double-height space, which also includes a spiral staircase leading to a loft.
The apartment renovation takes raw, industrial materials and celebrates them in a refined way.
The client leads an active lifestyle, and the design team had initially planned on putting a climbing wall in one corner of the apartment. While this feature didn’t make it into the final design, there is abundant storage for bikes and ski gear.
Much of the furniture— including the nine-foot dining table created from a single slab of a fallen Guanacaste tree—was custom made by local millworker HDM. The Eames Molded chairs are from Herman Miller, and the pendant light from IKEA.
The long kitchen table, which can comfortably sit eight, has been handcrafted from salvaged cedar. Birch and chalkboard barn doors effortlessly hide any unwanted clutter.
The homeowners wanted a multifunctional dining space conducive to alfresco meals.
In the dining room and loft space, the original brick wall has been left exposed and raw.
The patterned ceiling LEDs can mimic daylight to sync with occupants' circadian cycles—or they can create mood lighting.
Dining room
Equipped with solar panels and solar thermal technology, the FutureHAUS produces all of its own energy, with enough leftover to feed the grid.
The home has three different roof levels. Ceilings are composed of modular concrete blocks and the red concrete is scored to resemble tiles throughout.
The dining hall's monochromatic tones are slightly offset by the brown cork tables flanked by new Fat dining chairs upholstered in Raf Simons' latest collection for Kvadrat.
To provide privacy without putting up light-obstructing walls, the architects installed curtains that can be pulled along curved tracks in the bedrooms and bathrooms.
Double-glazed windows open the home up to the permaculture garden outside and northern sunlight. The kitchen is visible from nearly every room in the home.
interior house
In the dining room, a long table is used both as a desk and for dining. Vintage Thonet chairs sit alongside black metal and cork stools from IKEA. The interior celebrates an eclectic mix of modest with luxury, found with made, repurposed with bought. A Globe Fold Sconce, designed by CaSA and produced by Metalware, is showcased on the dining room wall.
The dining area features a limited-edition lamp from Habitat.
The kitchen was sunk down a few steps to better define it from the rest of the living spaces, while built-in, Douglas Fir cabinetry maximizes and streamlines storage. The custom Douglas Fir table is by ZZ Contracting.
The dining space. The Joules midcentury modern chandelier was ordered from Etsy.
The wine cellar can be seen through the glass section of the floor.
When the glass partitions are open, the passive heat from the conservatory is then released into the adjoining living spaces.
For the dining nook, Woodline Design created a custom table and banquette featuring cushions wrapped in Great Outdoors Shale fabric. The chairs are the Harp 349 by Roda. The "Fresh Crabs" sign adds a beachy, folk art feel.
Built-in buffets are a standout feature of the dining room.
The sun-drenched dining nook.
Horner replaced the closed storage with custom, open shelving that now connects to the entry, increasing natural light and sight lines throughout the house.
In the dining area sits Finn Juhl 109 chairs, a bespoke table, as well as a chandelier from Flos. There is also a Le Corbusier painting on the wall.
A gray table, mint-green pendant lamp, and blue dining chairs are located in the dining area.
Indoor/outdoor living was a priority in the redesign, and the interior was reconfigured so that views of the backyard and the majestic gum tree can be immediately seen as soon as the front door is opened.
Recycled timbers are used throughout the home from the curved bench to the joinery in the kitchen. The kitchen also connects to a cold-store walk-in pantry that’s cooled with an in-slab ventilation pipe funneling cool under-house air.
An overview of the first-floor living space. Despite the dark color palette, the home is still able to find plenty of light with the full-height sliding doors.
Perforated black panels became a recurring theme throughout the home. For instance, here they are employed on the walls of the kitchen.
The full-height sliding glass doors have been added to mediate the threshold between the garden and house.
Interior view toward breakfast area
Entry courtyard to the right and dinning room in the front flanked by covered glass patio.
Dining room with a covered patio and fabric curtain(open position) for privacy and harsh south sun.
The home references Singapore's lush outdoors with an abundance of natural light, greenery, and timber.
The concrete wall mimics the slope of the hill outside as a reference to early Maori structures that were dug into the land. The simple kitchen has strandboard cabinetry and an MDF island that conceals a fireplace at one end. The ceramic works on the built-in seat at right are by Raewyn Atkinson and Robyn Lewis.
The dining area features a Snaregade Table by Norm Architects for Menu.
Each line is in communication with every other line: ceiling lines align with glazing patterns, while in the dining room the windows open together, a reference to the idea of a “machine for living.”
A sliding door conceals an office/guestroom, laundry, pantry, and bathroom.
The kitchen island is made from oxidized steel with a honed black marble benchtop. Cabinetry in blackbutt, an Australian hardwood known for its fire resistance, contrasts with the dark interiors.
The dining table is original to the house.  A glass top now sits on top to preserve the surface from further wear and tear.   Very rare, H.W. Klein #250 dining chairs manufactured by Bramin complement the table.
The dining room is meant to be a flexible space for eating or dancing. “One of the most important things for me,” explains Grunbaum, “is how a house feels. It has to be a place where you don’t want to leave.” The Cyclone table is by Isamu Noguchi for Knoll and the pendant lamp is by Lightoiler.
Sunset pendants by Treviso-based Torremato illuminate a custom table and bench as well as a trio of Eames chairs. Di Stefano and Bongiorno used lighting to structure the open plan: “We put accents on focus points; we didn’t want the light completely spread out,” Di Stefano says.
The Pierre | Olson Kundig

The modern dining room is where the universal ritual of breaking bread brings us together. The projects below showcase elegant configurations and designs that encompass chairs and tables, bars and stools, lighting, flooring, and fireplaces.