A Cramped Midcentury Bungalow Gets a Luminous New Addition

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By Michele Koh Morollo
Edward Ogosta Architecture renovates and extends a Californian dwelling, creating a breezy, light-filled home for a family of five.

Sited on a cramped corner lot in Manhattan Beach, California, this midcentury bungalow was renovated and enlarged with a 1,000-square-foot addition to create a total of 1,986 square feet of functional space for owners Alison and Jeff Goad and their three children. 

Culver City–based practice Edward Ogosta Architecture demolished and remodeled parts of the existing house to include a larger master bedroom and a new bedroom, bathroom, and powder room. The project also included updates to the two existing bedrooms, the laundry room, and garage. 

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Ogosta used staggered board-form concrete site walls to raise the house above the street level. 

Ogosta used staggered board-form concrete site walls to raise the house above the street level. 

The open plan living, dining, and kitchen areas.

The open plan living, dining, and kitchen areas.

The design responds to the house’s challenging location at a busy, suburban intersection at the bottom of a bowl-shaped dip in the terrain. 

A sky-lit hallway.

A sky-lit hallway.

"Local codes severely reduced the available building envelope with increased corner site setbacks, height limits, and ordinances protecting the mature tree onsite," says Ogosta. "In order to economize the budget, most of the existing house was to remain."

A wood pivot door with a recessed, custom-cut coir doormat.

A wood pivot door with a recessed, custom-cut coir doormat.

An open-plan living room, dining room, and double-height kitchen are housed within the 1,000-square-foot addition. Rift-cut, white oak millwork brings much warmth to the pure white interiors.

The built-in dining nook with dark gray banquette seating is textured with white oak vertical slats that reference the cement board fins on the house’s façade.

The built-in dining nook with dark gray banquette seating is textured with white oak vertical slats that reference the cement board fins on the house’s façade.

The original structure and the new addition were unified with a restrained material palette inspired by the raw concrete sea walls, driftwood, sand, and beach grasses in the Manhattan Beach area, and the whitewashed bungalows in the neighborhood. 

At the rear patio is a kitchen, dining area, and an Ipe-wood deck with a fire pit, lounge seats, and a water feature.

At the rear patio is a kitchen, dining area, and an Ipe-wood deck with a fire pit, lounge seats, and a water feature.

The client wanted to minimize noise from the street, but they still wanted large openings to connect the new living, dining, and kitchen spaces to the outdoors. As a noise buffer, Ogosta created an interior lining of cabinetry, which serves as a thick acoustical barrier along the street-facing length of the house. 

On the sides of the front folding glass doors are vertical cement board fins that emphasize the street-side corner. 

On the sides of the front folding glass doors are vertical cement board fins that emphasize the street-side corner. 

Elevating the house from the street helped to add privacy to the front entrance and patio. 

A new walkway and outdoor terraces are part of the addition.

A new walkway and outdoor terraces are part of the addition.

On both ends of the common area, massive folding glass doors open to maximize cross ventilation and light penetration, and enhance spatial flow through the courtyards. 

Clerestory windows bring plenty of natural light into the double-height kitchen. The kitchen has  a white quartz countertop and island, and a white Carrara marble tabletop.

Clerestory windows bring plenty of natural light into the double-height kitchen. The kitchen has  a white quartz countertop and island, and a white Carrara marble tabletop.

To create a more homogenous look, the existing roof on the original bungalow was flattened, and its walls were finished in smooth white plaster to match the new addition.  

Polished concrete is used for the interiors of the common areas, while white oak floors are used in the private zones. 

Polished concrete is used for the interiors of the common areas, while white oak floors are used in the private zones. 

The simple and peaceful serene master bedroom looks out to the rear patio. 

The simple and peaceful serene master bedroom looks out to the rear patio. 

Ogosta left approximately 70 percent of the footprint of the existing house intact to conserve construction materials and resources. 

The aqua field tiles in the powder room echo the colors of the Pacific Ocean nearby.

The aqua field tiles in the powder room echo the colors of the Pacific Ocean nearby.

The sections of the roof that aren’t shaded by trees were fitted with photovoltaic panels to generate 100 percent of electricity used by the Goads, making the house a net-zero energy building that is able to function off-the-grid. 

The bedrooms, laundry room, and bathroom are connected by a central hallway with a skylight above it.

The bedrooms, laundry room, and bathroom are connected by a central hallway with a skylight above it.

"Through clarity and restraint, the house resolves its active corner condition, resulting in an intimate pocket of luminosity, atmosphere, and serenity," says Ogosta. 

Floor plan

Floor plan

Project Credits: 

Architecture: Edward Ogosta Architecture 

Builder: MFR Construction 

Structural engineering: Orland Engineering 

Doors: LaCantina Doors

Photography: Steve King