An Austin Midcentury Welcomes a Discreet Home Office Addition

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By Jennifer Baum Lagdameo
From the outside, you would never know this flexible working/entertaining space even exists.

Designed to comfortably accommodate three to five employees, the 1,000-square-foot home office that Matt Fajkus Architecture has recently built beautifully complements an existing midcentury abode in Austin, Texas. 

The wood and stucco addition features a pitched metal roof that complements the existing home's midcentury style. The hidden side windows (by the planter) allow natural light to filter in. 

The wood and stucco addition features a pitched metal roof that complements the existing home's midcentury style. The hidden side windows (by the planter) allow natural light to filter in. 

To meet the privacy needs of the clients who work in the financial sector, Creekbluff Studio has been built with a solid front facade and discreet entrance. It has also been cladded in wood and stucco to seamlessly merge with the home and surrounding landscape.

A glass entry connects the addition and offers a clear view of—and direct access to–the natural landscape surrounding the site. 

A glass entry connects the addition and offers a clear view of—and direct access to–the natural landscape surrounding the site. 

Despite the discreetness, natural lighting has not been sacrificed in the design. "By offsetting the wood-panel portion of the front wall, the office harvests daylight from the street elevation through side windows that are hidden from the street-view, " explains the architects.

Unlike its solid front, the back of Creekbluff Studio opens to the outdoors with large windows, floor-to-ceiling glass doors, and a patio tucked between tree canopies which overlook the nearby creek. 

Unlike its solid front, the back of Creekbluff Studio opens to the outdoors with large windows, floor-to-ceiling glass doors, and a patio tucked between tree canopies which overlook the nearby creek. 

Ultimately, the team has been able to more than compensate for the fortress-like facade, thanks to the use of a glass-box entry and significant glazing to the rear of the addition. 

Wood ceilings extend out, further strengthening the indoor/outdoor connection. 

Wood ceilings extend out, further strengthening the indoor/outdoor connection. 

The addition includes two individual office spaces, a conference room, a studio, a bathroom, and storage space. An operable wall divides the main space as needed. 

The addition includes two individual office spaces, a conference room, a studio, a bathroom, and storage space. An operable wall divides the main space as needed. 

Unlike the solid front facade, the back elevation is replete with glazing.

Unlike the solid front facade, the back elevation is replete with glazing.

In the rear, a wooden deck is supported by concrete and shaded by a roof overhang. 

In the rear, a wooden deck is supported by concrete and shaded by a roof overhang. 

The back deck provides the perfect spot for entertaining and enjoying the lush landscape. 

The back deck provides the perfect spot for entertaining and enjoying the lush landscape. 

An Austin Midcentury Welcomes a Discreet Home Office Addition - Photo 9 of 10 -
The site plan.

The site plan.

Project Credits: 

Architect: Matt Fajkus Architecture 

Architecture Design Team: David Birt; Matt Fajkus

AIA General Contractor: A.R. Lucas Construction Company, Adam Lucas

Structural Engineer: Smith Structural Engineers, Jeffrey L. Smith

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