“Good designers must always be avant-gardists, always one step ahead of the times. They should–and must–question everything generally thought to be obvious. They must have an intuition for people’s changing attitudes. For the reality in which they live, for their dreams, their desires, their worries, their needs, their living habits. They must also be able to assess realistically the opportunities and bounds of technology.” –Dieter Rams

Barbara Hill's Dancehall/House in Marfa, Texas

September 14, 2010

Misty Keasle
Barbara Hill's Dancehall/House in Marfa, Texas September 14, 2010 Misty Keasle
Milanese architect Mario Bellini at home. Photo by Davide Pizzigoni.
Milanese architect Mario Bellini at home. Photo by Davide Pizzigoni.
MARIO BELLINI

Mario Bellini loves Milanese urban culture, the city. His home, in a C19th building reworked 

by Piero Portaluppi, is designed around a large 9 metre tall library/staircase, which runs 

through and across it like a telescope. The books, artworks and objects make it reminiscent of 

Antonello da Messina’s painting of St. Jerome’s study. He is about to embark on a design for a 

white cube, his new home. That is his dream. Photo by Davide Pizzigoni.
MARIO BELLINI Mario Bellini loves Milanese urban culture, the city. His home, in a C19th building reworked by Piero Portaluppi, is designed around a large 9 metre tall library/staircase, which runs through and across it like a telescope. The books, artworks and objects make it reminiscent of Antonello da Messina’s painting of St. Jerome’s study. He is about to embark on a design for a white cube, his new home. That is his dream. Photo by Davide Pizzigoni.
The young danish designer Søren Rose shot by Canziani for our May 2012 issue.
The young danish designer Søren Rose shot by Canziani for our May 2012 issue.
Meg’s inspiration:

The design of the Lucky Linden was something Meg carried along with from many years in her sketchbook. She loves the Art and Craft styled RV’s and was sure that if she built a tiny house RV someday, this would be a her inspiration. What she like most of this pattern is the low sloped roofs, pop out dormers on the front as well as back and especially the bungalow look from the Sears and Roebuck kit houses which were prevalent in the 1990’s.
Meg’s inspiration: The design of the Lucky Linden was something Meg carried along with from many years in her sketchbook. She loves the Art and Craft styled RV’s and was sure that if she built a tiny house RV someday, this would be a her inspiration. What she like most of this pattern is the low sloped roofs, pop out dormers on the front as well as back and especially the bungalow look from the Sears and Roebuck kit houses which were prevalent in the 1990’s.
A look at the SaloneSatellite exhibition.
A look at the SaloneSatellite exhibition.
Thanks to Matthew Hufft, their envelope-pushing architect and longtime friend, Hannah and Paul Catlett have a new home in southwestern Missouri that’s a fresh, unconventional take on the traditional farmhouse.
Thanks to Matthew Hufft, their envelope-pushing architect and longtime friend, Hannah and Paul Catlett have a new home in southwestern Missouri that’s a fresh, unconventional take on the traditional farmhouse.
Full Bloom

The white Vico Magistretti dining table is a focal point when you enter the house--"and a great spot to create assemblages of some of my favorite objects," says Neely, who changes the display every few weeks. Set atop a reversible Finn Juhl tray are ceramics from Heath and a Carl Auböck fruit knife with a cane-wrapped handle. Notes Neely:"I always keep a handful of tillandsia around--air plants soften and warm up the space."
Full Bloom The white Vico Magistretti dining table is a focal point when you enter the house--"and a great spot to create assemblages of some of my favorite objects," says Neely, who changes the display every few weeks. Set atop a reversible Finn Juhl tray are ceramics from Heath and a Carl Auböck fruit knife with a cane-wrapped handle. Notes Neely:"I always keep a handful of tillandsia around--air plants soften and warm up the space."
Among the exhibitions on the show floor were a curated display by industrial designer Stephen Burks, the show’s keynote speaker.
Among the exhibitions on the show floor were a curated display by industrial designer Stephen Burks, the show’s keynote speaker.
Rolling Huts (Winthrop, United States)

A series of six modernist huts created by Tom Kundig of Olson Kundig Architects, the Rolling Huts look like rustic case study homes, a herd of designer cabins that just may exemplify the term 'glamping.' Elevated on stilts, the 200-square-foot structures offer another level of outdoor accommodation. 

Photos by Chad Kirkpatrick
Rolling Huts (Winthrop, United States) A series of six modernist huts created by Tom Kundig of Olson Kundig Architects, the Rolling Huts look like rustic case study homes, a herd of designer cabins that just may exemplify the term 'glamping.' Elevated on stilts, the 200-square-foot structures offer another level of outdoor accommodation. Photos by Chad Kirkpatrick
Sitting Pretty

The ground floor was originally two rooms; now it’s been transformed into one continuous space. To compensate for a low ceiling, Kiely’s team dug into the ground to create a true sunken seating section leading to the garden. Built-in sofas, an Eames rocker, a stool by G Plan, and concrete tiles outfit the space. Kiely chose a neutral charcoal finish for the Malm fireplace to balance the green linoleum floor and her own Rhododendron wallpaper in Sunflower.
Sitting Pretty The ground floor was originally two rooms; now it’s been transformed into one continuous space. To compensate for a low ceiling, Kiely’s team dug into the ground to create a true sunken seating section leading to the garden. Built-in sofas, an Eames rocker, a stool by G Plan, and concrete tiles outfit the space. Kiely chose a neutral charcoal finish for the Malm fireplace to balance the green linoleum floor and her own Rhododendron wallpaper in Sunflower.
Kitchen Confidential 

Kiely and architect Maxim Laroussi designed the kitchen unit. “I originally didn’t want an island, but I liked what we did because it feels like a piece of furniture. It’s cozy to cook around,” Kiely says. Panels of orange and olive Formica accent the 1950s-inspired piece, which houses a cooktop by Smeg. A checkerboard of closed cabinets and open shelves offers storage against the far wall for Kiely’s collection of dishes, knickknacks, cookbooks, and small appliances, like the KitchenAid stand mixer and radio by Vita Audio. The floor is green Marmoleum, selected because it feels warm underfoot. Kiely’s own Stem dish towels and ceramic storage jars add more lively color to the room.
Kitchen Confidential Kiely and architect Maxim Laroussi designed the kitchen unit. “I originally didn’t want an island, but I liked what we did because it feels like a piece of furniture. It’s cozy to cook around,” Kiely says. Panels of orange and olive Formica accent the 1950s-inspired piece, which houses a cooktop by Smeg. A checkerboard of closed cabinets and open shelves offers storage against the far wall for Kiely’s collection of dishes, knickknacks, cookbooks, and small appliances, like the KitchenAid stand mixer and radio by Vita Audio. The floor is green Marmoleum, selected because it feels warm underfoot. Kiely’s own Stem dish towels and ceramic storage jars add more lively color to the room.
“Part of the story of why we became designers is because we saw what the masters did.”—Søren Rose
“Part of the story of why we became designers is because we saw what the masters did.”—Søren Rose
Creative workshops allow youngsters a chance to explore art and gives Nike a way to market product. Nike allows visitors to the locations to customize products in a way not otherwise possible. By offering a different set of materials than what's available to the greater public, visitors feel they have ownership in the retail experience, as seen here in Milan.
Creative workshops allow youngsters a chance to explore art and gives Nike a way to market product. Nike allows visitors to the locations to customize products in a way not otherwise possible. By offering a different set of materials than what's available to the greater public, visitors feel they have ownership in the retail experience, as seen here in Milan.
Nike Stadium space offers a series of programming set in tandem with the sporting calendar as shown in the Milan location. Merging the idea of creating products and viewing sport, all with bolts of color, plays out well in this location.
Nike Stadium space offers a series of programming set in tandem with the sporting calendar as shown in the Milan location. Merging the idea of creating products and viewing sport, all with bolts of color, plays out well in this location.
Textile designer Orla Kiely’s renovated London Terrace House is punctuated by her distinctive palette and motifs.
Textile designer Orla Kiely’s renovated London Terrace House is punctuated by her distinctive palette and motifs.
Afternoon sunlight filters through the steel windows in this view looking toward the children's playroom.  In all of our projects we design the lighting specific to our client's artwork.  Here one of our favorites an LED Bevel tape-in fixture by USA Iluminations highlights a beautiful painting, c. 1900, of a cowboy.
Afternoon sunlight filters through the steel windows in this view looking toward the children's playroom. In all of our projects we design the lighting specific to our client's artwork. Here one of our favorites an LED Bevel tape-in fixture by USA Iluminations highlights a beautiful painting, c. 1900, of a cowboy.
Home of the Brave

In the ground-floor eating area, the design team wrapped the walls in rich walnut to instill warmth often found in mid-century homes. “Sometimes one bold move is enough. Be brave with fewer statements,” Kiely advises. “Go for the big thing rather than lots of little things.” Kiely’s Upholstered Dining Chairs from her House collection surround a Danish vintage dining table. Her Gloss vases adorn the hallway console, which is also from her House line.
Home of the Brave In the ground-floor eating area, the design team wrapped the walls in rich walnut to instill warmth often found in mid-century homes. “Sometimes one bold move is enough. Be brave with fewer statements,” Kiely advises. “Go for the big thing rather than lots of little things.” Kiely’s Upholstered Dining Chairs from her House collection surround a Danish vintage dining table. Her Gloss vases adorn the hallway console, which is also from her House line.
A portrait of the designer. “Architecture, to me, is the most beautiful of the arts. I always knew that I wanted to design, but only [if I could] create products over which I had total control.”
A portrait of the designer. “Architecture, to me, is the most beautiful of the arts. I always knew that I wanted to design, but only [if I could] create products over which I had total control.”
For a slightly funkier feel, opt for a variety of high-design chairs around your table. A less rigid approach to hanging art can also ease the hard lines of much modern decor and add to a more bohemian vibe to your home.
For a slightly funkier feel, opt for a variety of high-design chairs around your table. A less rigid approach to hanging art can also ease the hard lines of much modern decor and add to a more bohemian vibe to your home.
Designer Christiane Hogner, Bruxelles
Designer Christiane Hogner, Bruxelles
In the foreground, museum visitors converse at a picnic table constructed by resident artists Aaron Anderson and Eric Timothy Carlson to form a point of communication in the gallery setting. The duo used the museum’s studios to create a new material, which they then applied to the table. In the background is On Display, a plethora of printed ephemera used to create talking points for the public. Through conversation, the display of the materials is covered, revealed, and changed to show the course of the dialogue about the museum and its role in design. On Display  was created by Superscript and designers HAO and Neil Donnelly. Photo by Ed Watkins.
In the foreground, museum visitors converse at a picnic table constructed by resident artists Aaron Anderson and Eric Timothy Carlson to form a point of communication in the gallery setting. The duo used the museum’s studios to create a new material, which they then applied to the table. In the background is On Display, a plethora of printed ephemera used to create talking points for the public. Through conversation, the display of the materials is covered, revealed, and changed to show the course of the dialogue about the museum and its role in design. On Display was created by Superscript and designers HAO and Neil Donnelly. Photo by Ed Watkins.
A higher profile designer, the Spanish designer Nacho Carbonell's Skin series is also on display at Industry Gallery.
A higher profile designer, the Spanish designer Nacho Carbonell's Skin series is also on display at Industry Gallery.
The designer at work.
The designer at work.
A view from the home office / guest room looking toward the dining area and stair to the penthouse.  On the left are custom barrister cases based on the wonderful modular bookcase manufactured by Globe-Wernicke in the early 1900s.  These are painted one of our favorite colors Plummett by Farrow & Ball.
A view from the home office / guest room looking toward the dining area and stair to the penthouse. On the left are custom barrister cases based on the wonderful modular bookcase manufactured by Globe-Wernicke in the early 1900s. These are painted one of our favorite colors Plummett by Farrow & Ball.
The dining room table is often used for rousing games of cribbage, but cleans up nicely when it's time to eat. The small balcony outside is home to a collection of plants (which get watered more often than the succulents inside).
The dining room table is often used for rousing games of cribbage, but cleans up nicely when it's time to eat. The small balcony outside is home to a collection of plants (which get watered more often than the succulents inside).
A second bedroom was converted into a home office/dining room. A Dieter Rams 606 Universal Shelving System (below and opposite) lines the wall. The “Ziggy Diamond” wallpaper (behind the surreal Erle Loran painting) comes from Flavor Paper, a New Orleans firm that prints wall coverings to order, and the ingenious folding table is by Swedish designer Bruno Matthson.
A second bedroom was converted into a home office/dining room. A Dieter Rams 606 Universal Shelving System (below and opposite) lines the wall. The “Ziggy Diamond” wallpaper (behind the surreal Erle Loran painting) comes from Flavor Paper, a New Orleans firm that prints wall coverings to order, and the ingenious folding table is by Swedish designer Bruno Matthson.
The ToolsGalerie in the Marais district spotlights the work of young French designers.
The ToolsGalerie in the Marais district spotlights the work of young French designers.
The house clearly displays its Sea Ranch–style touches.
The house clearly displays its Sea Ranch–style touches.
A look inside the @fondazioneachillecastiglioni, which is filled with prototypes, models, humble objects Castiglione collected, and more ephemera that you can imagine. The Foundation began a digitization project in the early 2000s and still discovers new work in the hundreds of files.
A look inside the @fondazioneachillecastiglioni, which is filled with prototypes, models, humble objects Castiglione collected, and more ephemera that you can imagine. The Foundation began a digitization project in the early 2000s and still discovers new work in the hundreds of files.
Iskos-Berlin’s Birth of Marilyn is a lampshade meant to evoke a skirt lifted by the wind. The duo behind the brand strives to develop products using rationalized production processes to generate a minimal waste of materials and other resources. The lampshades are made from two layers of mostly recycled PET felt.
Iskos-Berlin’s Birth of Marilyn is a lampshade meant to evoke a skirt lifted by the wind. The duo behind the brand strives to develop products using rationalized production processes to generate a minimal waste of materials and other resources. The lampshades are made from two layers of mostly recycled PET felt.

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