Prefab homes have always been a part of the Dwell DNA. Here you will find prefab homes published in dwell magazine as well as great prefab home ideas. Prefabricated means either panelized, modular, or kit homes. Prefab architecture works for both remote sites and dense urban spaces. Modular homes are popular but can be the most expensive to customize. It is best to change as little as possible when buying prefab. Possible advantages of pre fab include lower cost, higher degree of precision, and less construction waste.

The house weathered a recent tornado that caused significant damage to much of the property. Ellzey sees the house as an outgrowth of Frank Lloyd Wright’s experiments with modular housing. "For me, it was in that spirit of, what can it mean for homebuilding?"
The house weathered a recent tornado that caused significant damage to much of the property. Ellzey sees the house as an outgrowth of Frank Lloyd Wright’s experiments with modular housing. "For me, it was in that spirit of, what can it mean for homebuilding?"
Frank Lloyd Wright's Spring House in Tallahassee, Florida, was commissioned by George and Clifton Lewis, who sought a comfortable house for their large family that fit within their modest budget. Completed in 1954, the home features an unusual "hemicycle" form—a shape that the designer briefly experimented with at the end of his career. Now, a fundraising campaign aims to acquire, restore, and open the house to the public.
Frank Lloyd Wright's Spring House in Tallahassee, Florida, was commissioned by George and Clifton Lewis, who sought a comfortable house for their large family that fit within their modest budget. Completed in 1954, the home features an unusual "hemicycle" form—a shape that the designer briefly experimented with at the end of his career. Now, a fundraising campaign aims to acquire, restore, and open the house to the public.
Located seven miles from Frank Lloyd Wright’s estate, Tim Wright and Karen Ellzey’s prefab home is meant to pay homage to the great American architect’s experiments with modular housing.
Located seven miles from Frank Lloyd Wright’s estate, Tim Wright and Karen Ellzey’s prefab home is meant to pay homage to the great American architect’s experiments with modular housing.
Wright, who teaches a course in visual literacy at Taliesin, works at a #101 dining table by Skovby.
Wright, who teaches a course in visual literacy at Taliesin, works at a #101 dining table by Skovby.
New York City boasts only two Frank Lloyd Wright structures: the Guggenheim Museum, and this modest prefab on Staten Island. The Cass House was built according to the Prefab #1 plan he designed for Erdman's prefab company. According to the New York Times, "It was built late in his life from a plan for prefab moderate-cost housing. The components were made in a Midwest factory and shipped to Staten Island for construction under the supervision of a Wright associate, Morton H. Delson... Wright had planned to tour the Staten Island house, but shortly before his scheduled arrival he became ill and died at age 92 on April 9, 1959." [Photo via Bridge and Tunnel Club]
New York City boasts only two Frank Lloyd Wright structures: the Guggenheim Museum, and this modest prefab on Staten Island. The Cass House was built according to the Prefab #1 plan he designed for Erdman's prefab company. According to the New York Times, "It was built late in his life from a plan for prefab moderate-cost housing. The components were made in a Midwest factory and shipped to Staten Island for construction under the supervision of a Wright associate, Morton H. Delson... Wright had planned to tour the Staten Island house, but shortly before his scheduled arrival he became ill and died at age 92 on April 9, 1959." [Photo via Bridge and Tunnel Club]
The Rudin House in Madison, built following Lloyd Wright's prefabricated Plan #2 for Marshall Erdman's company, is one of two homes built as a large, flat-roofed square with a double-height living room accented with a wall of windows. [Photo via Mike Condren]
The Rudin House in Madison, built following Lloyd Wright's prefabricated Plan #2 for Marshall Erdman's company, is one of two homes built as a large, flat-roofed square with a double-height living room accented with a wall of windows. [Photo via Mike Condren]
Another house built from Wright's Prefab #1 plan for Marshall Erdman & Associates, the Socrates Zaferiou House in New York state, was sold in 2014. 

The Prefab #1 layouts, which ranged in size from 1,800 to 2,400 square feet, shared a single story, L-shaped plan with a "pitched-roof bedroom wing joining a flat-roofed living-dining-kitchen area centered on a large masonry fireplace." Alongside prefabrication managed by Erdman's company, the architect sourced off-the-rack Andersen windows and Pella doors and used basic materials like plywood and Masonite to cut costs. [Photos via Curbed]
Another house built from Wright's Prefab #1 plan for Marshall Erdman & Associates, the Socrates Zaferiou House in New York state, was sold in 2014. The Prefab #1 layouts, which ranged in size from 1,800 to 2,400 square feet, shared a single story, L-shaped plan with a "pitched-roof bedroom wing joining a flat-roofed living-dining-kitchen area centered on a large masonry fireplace." Alongside prefabrication managed by Erdman's company, the architect sourced off-the-rack Andersen windows and Pella doors and used basic materials like plywood and Masonite to cut costs. [Photos via Curbed]
The kitchen island, with a Raven countertop from Caesarstone’s Classico Collection, is illuminated by a set of April pendant lamps by WAC Lighting.
The kitchen island, with a Raven countertop from Caesarstone’s Classico Collection, is illuminated by a set of April pendant lamps by WAC Lighting.
As the only handicap-accessible building designed by Frank Lloyd Wright, the Kenneth and Phyllis Laurent House (so named for the couple that lived there from 1952 until 2012) was completed in 1952 as one of the so-called Usonian homes. The couple married shortly before World War II, and Ken Laurent underwent surgery during his service in the Navy that left him paralyzed from the waist down. Wright listened closely to his clients' needs to create an accessible design that was decades ahead of his time, including thresholds and floors that are level with the exterior ground for easy transitions between inside and outside. Wright designed much of the furniture in the house.
As the only handicap-accessible building designed by Frank Lloyd Wright, the Kenneth and Phyllis Laurent House (so named for the couple that lived there from 1952 until 2012) was completed in 1952 as one of the so-called Usonian homes. The couple married shortly before World War II, and Ken Laurent underwent surgery during his service in the Navy that left him paralyzed from the waist down. Wright listened closely to his clients' needs to create an accessible design that was decades ahead of his time, including thresholds and floors that are level with the exterior ground for easy transitions between inside and outside. Wright designed much of the furniture in the house.
Herbert and Katherine Jacobs House (1936, Madison, Wisconsin). This brick and wood abode, built affordably for a family, is an example of indoor-outdoor living—a wall of full-height glazed doors open onto a terrace.
Herbert and Katherine Jacobs House (1936, Madison, Wisconsin). This brick and wood abode, built affordably for a family, is an example of indoor-outdoor living—a wall of full-height glazed doors open onto a terrace.
As the only handicap-accessible building designed by Frank Lloyd Wright, the Kenneth and Phyllis Laurent House (so named for the couple that lived there from 1952 until 2012) was completed in 1952 as one of the so-called Usonian homes. The couple married shortly before World War II, and Ken Laurent underwent surgery during his service in the Navy that left him paralyzed from the waist down. Wright listened closely to his clients' needs, featuring accessible design that were decades ahead of his time, including a lack of thresholds and floors that are level with the exterior ground for easy transitions between inside and outside. Wright designed much of the furniture in the house, including the built-in seating shown here.
As the only handicap-accessible building designed by Frank Lloyd Wright, the Kenneth and Phyllis Laurent House (so named for the couple that lived there from 1952 until 2012) was completed in 1952 as one of the so-called Usonian homes. The couple married shortly before World War II, and Ken Laurent underwent surgery during his service in the Navy that left him paralyzed from the waist down. Wright listened closely to his clients' needs, featuring accessible design that were decades ahead of his time, including a lack of thresholds and floors that are level with the exterior ground for easy transitions between inside and outside. Wright designed much of the furniture in the house, including the built-in seating shown here.
The Kenneth and Phyllis Laurent House, designed by Frank Lloyd Wright, features a solar hemicycle footprint. Image courtesy of Wright Auction House.
The Kenneth and Phyllis Laurent House, designed by Frank Lloyd Wright, features a solar hemicycle footprint. Image courtesy of Wright Auction House.
In the great room, a Splendor sofa bed by Innovation, an Eames Wire Base Elliptical table, and an Eames Wire Base Low table sit atop a Tufenkian rug from Dover Rug & Home near a #11 dining table by Skovby.
In the great room, a Splendor sofa bed by Innovation, an Eames Wire Base Elliptical table, and an Eames Wire Base Low table sit atop a Tufenkian rug from Dover Rug & Home near a #11 dining table by Skovby.
The Courmayeur Ski & Snowboard School's home is part of a cluster of buildings located in the ski area of Plan Checrouit, at the foot of Mont Blanc. LEAPfactory’s design for the facility, while crisp and contemporary, echoes the design of its neighbors, particularly their asymmetrical gables.
The Courmayeur Ski & Snowboard School's home is part of a cluster of buildings located in the ski area of Plan Checrouit, at the foot of Mont Blanc. LEAPfactory’s design for the facility, while crisp and contemporary, echoes the design of its neighbors, particularly their asymmetrical gables.
Frank Lloyd Wright and Eugene Masselink at the exhibition Frank Lloyd Wright, American Architect, November 13, 1940–January 5, 1941, in The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Photo by Soichi Sunami.
Frank Lloyd Wright and Eugene Masselink at the exhibition Frank Lloyd Wright, American Architect, November 13, 1940–January 5, 1941, in The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Photo by Soichi Sunami.
After a two year long renovation, the Frank Lloyd Wright’s Emil Bach House will soon be open to the public. Curbed Chicago took a full tour of the thoughtful renovation. Photo by Nicholas James
After a two year long renovation, the Frank Lloyd Wright’s Emil Bach House will soon be open to the public. Curbed Chicago took a full tour of the thoughtful renovation. Photo by Nicholas James
Fallingwater, Mill Run, Pennsylvania, designed by Frank Lloyd Wright, 1963. Gelatin silver print. Carnegie Museum of Art, Purchase: gift of the Drue Heinz Trust. Image courtesy of Carnegie Museum of Art, copyright Ezra Stoller/Esto, Yossi Milo Gallery.
Fallingwater, Mill Run, Pennsylvania, designed by Frank Lloyd Wright, 1963. Gelatin silver print. Carnegie Museum of Art, Purchase: gift of the Drue Heinz Trust. Image courtesy of Carnegie Museum of Art, copyright Ezra Stoller/Esto, Yossi Milo Gallery.
The only grouping of Frank Lloyd Wright's early American System-Built Homes—built by Arthur Richards and designed with standardized components for mass appeal to moderate-income families—is situated in the Burnham Park neighborhood in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. The four model 7A duplexes, one model B1 bungalow (shown here), and model C3 bungalow were added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1985.
The only grouping of Frank Lloyd Wright's early American System-Built Homes—built by Arthur Richards and designed with standardized components for mass appeal to moderate-income families—is situated in the Burnham Park neighborhood in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. The four model 7A duplexes, one model B1 bungalow (shown here), and model C3 bungalow were added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1985.
As Wright’s first L.A. project, the iconic Hollyhock House was built between 1919 and 1921 and was filled with challenges from beginning to end. Enter Aline Barnsdall, the wealthy oil heiress and arts patron who held the dream of having a live-in venue to produce her own avant-garde plays. Wright wanted to create a design that would be defined by the region and that took advantage of Southern California's temperate climate. To do this, each interior space is echoed with an exterior space in the form of pergolas, porches, outdoor sleeping quarters, glass doors, and rooftop terraces that look out to the Hollywood Hills and the Los Angeles Basin.
As Wright’s first L.A. project, the iconic Hollyhock House was built between 1919 and 1921 and was filled with challenges from beginning to end. Enter Aline Barnsdall, the wealthy oil heiress and arts patron who held the dream of having a live-in venue to produce her own avant-garde plays. Wright wanted to create a design that would be defined by the region and that took advantage of Southern California's temperate climate. To do this, each interior space is echoed with an exterior space in the form of pergolas, porches, outdoor sleeping quarters, glass doors, and rooftop terraces that look out to the Hollywood Hills and the Los Angeles Basin.
Wisconsin Balance House 

Floor Plan

A    Closet

B    Porch

C    Kitchen-Dining-Living Area

D    Master Bathroom

E    Master Bedroom

F    Bathroom

G    Guest Bedrooom
Wisconsin Balance House Floor Plan A Closet B Porch C Kitchen-Dining-Living Area D Master Bathroom E Master Bedroom F Bathroom G Guest Bedrooom
Fallingwater is being interpreted by Tyler Stout, whose most recent screen print was a celebration of the 25th anniversary of the movie True Romance. “Stylistically, his interpretation is going to be really unique, really interesting,” says Hashimoto.
Fallingwater is being interpreted by Tyler Stout, whose most recent screen print was a celebration of the 25th anniversary of the movie True Romance. “Stylistically, his interpretation is going to be really unique, really interesting,” says Hashimoto.
Wright's home and studio, rebuilt after two fires, is a peaceful retreat that demonstrates the architect's graceful merging of architecture and landscape.
Wright's home and studio, rebuilt after two fires, is a peaceful retreat that demonstrates the architect's graceful merging of architecture and landscape.
Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum (1943, New York, New York). The museum, with its sweeping spiral staircase, is an international icon.
Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum (1943, New York, New York). The museum, with its sweeping spiral staircase, is an international icon.
Hollyhock House (1918, Los Angeles, California). This residence, the architect's first commission in Southern California, revolves around a central patio and contains multiple rooftop terraces.
Hollyhock House (1918, Los Angeles, California). This residence, the architect's first commission in Southern California, revolves around a central patio and contains multiple rooftop terraces.
Taliesin West (1938, Scottsdale, Arizona). Wright experimented with architectural techniques on his winter home and studio over the course of two decades. He developed a stone masonry out of boulders and rocks found around the site. The property houses the offices of the Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation; the resident staff and students who live and work at Taliesin and Taliesin West; and the Frank Lloyd Wright School of Architecture.
Taliesin West (1938, Scottsdale, Arizona). Wright experimented with architectural techniques on his winter home and studio over the course of two decades. He developed a stone masonry out of boulders and rocks found around the site. The property houses the offices of the Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation; the resident staff and students who live and work at Taliesin and Taliesin West; and the Frank Lloyd Wright School of Architecture.
Although the Price Tower is Wright’s only realized skyscraper, the rendering of the Grouped Towers in Chicago portrays similar themes of lightness and balance. The Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation Archives (The Museum of Modern Art | Avery Architectural & Fine Arts Library, Columbia University, New York).
Although the Price Tower is Wright’s only realized skyscraper, the rendering of the Grouped Towers in Chicago portrays similar themes of lightness and balance. The Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation Archives (The Museum of Modern Art | Avery Architectural & Fine Arts Library, Columbia University, New York).
UNESCO World Heritage Nomination

According to Scott Perkins, Director of Preservation at Fallingwater, ten of Wright’s building have been nominated to become UNESCO World Heritage sites, a massive inclusion that would add an important icon of American modernism to the prestigious list, as well as raise awareness and grant more public access to his work. The nominees include Fallingwater, the Hollyhock House, Taliesin West, Taliesin East, Unity Temple, the Guggenheim, Price Tower, Marin County Civic Center, the Frederick C. Robie House, and the Herbert and Katherine Jacobs First House. While the buildings have previously been submitted and are on the tentative list, supporters hope they make the final cut by 2016. 

Photo by John Amarantides
UNESCO World Heritage Nomination According to Scott Perkins, Director of Preservation at Fallingwater, ten of Wright’s building have been nominated to become UNESCO World Heritage sites, a massive inclusion that would add an important icon of American modernism to the prestigious list, as well as raise awareness and grant more public access to his work. The nominees include Fallingwater, the Hollyhock House, Taliesin West, Taliesin East, Unity Temple, the Guggenheim, Price Tower, Marin County Civic Center, the Frederick C. Robie House, and the Herbert and Katherine Jacobs First House. While the buildings have previously been submitted and are on the tentative list, supporters hope they make the final cut by 2016. Photo by John Amarantides
Unity Temple (1905, Oak Park, Illinois). This structure was one of the first public buildings to be made with affordable, poured-in-place reinforced concrete.
Unity Temple (1905, Oak Park, Illinois). This structure was one of the first public buildings to be made with affordable, poured-in-place reinforced concrete.
The seeds for Frank Lloyd Wright's collaboration with prefab builder Marshall Erdman were planted when Erdman hired the architect to design the First Unitarian Society meeting house in Madison, Wisconsin. [Photo credit courtesy The Kubala Washatko Architects (TKWA) via ArchDaily]
The seeds for Frank Lloyd Wright's collaboration with prefab builder Marshall Erdman were planted when Erdman hired the architect to design the First Unitarian Society meeting house in Madison, Wisconsin. [Photo credit courtesy The Kubala Washatko Architects (TKWA) via ArchDaily]
The James McBean Residence in Rochester, Minnesota, was built along the same plan as the Rudin House, with only minor surface changes like exterior paint color. 

[Photo via SaveWright.org forum]
The James McBean Residence in Rochester, Minnesota, was built along the same plan as the Rudin House, with only minor surface changes like exterior paint color. [Photo via SaveWright.org forum]
Hollyhock House is the first house of Wright’s second period and his first residence in Southern California. Named for Barnsdall’s favorite flower, the Hollyhock is incorporated throughout the design scheme of the residence.

The recently completed restoration is an important historical revelation for first-time visitors and regulars alike. Visitors will be able to see and experience the house in much of its original splendor. Floors, windows, doors, decorative molding, and long-forgotten paint colors have been re-created with utmost attention to detail and original intent. The latest phase of renovation took place from 2008 though 2014, with a total of $4,359,000 spent on conservation efforts. Hollyhock House is operated by the City of Los Angeles Department of Cultural Affairs (DCA).

After it reopens on February 13, 2015, Hollyhock House will feature self-guided “Walk Wright In” tours on Thursdays through Sundays from 11:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. for a fee of $7 for adults, $3 for students and seniors with identification, and $3 for children under 12 when accompanied by a paying adult. Special arrangements may be made for docent-led tours, group tours, guided tours, and other engagements by calling 323.913.4031. Click here for more information on the tours.
Hollyhock House is the first house of Wright’s second period and his first residence in Southern California. Named for Barnsdall’s favorite flower, the Hollyhock is incorporated throughout the design scheme of the residence. The recently completed restoration is an important historical revelation for first-time visitors and regulars alike. Visitors will be able to see and experience the house in much of its original splendor. Floors, windows, doors, decorative molding, and long-forgotten paint colors have been re-created with utmost attention to detail and original intent. The latest phase of renovation took place from 2008 though 2014, with a total of $4,359,000 spent on conservation efforts. Hollyhock House is operated by the City of Los Angeles Department of Cultural Affairs (DCA). After it reopens on February 13, 2015, Hollyhock House will feature self-guided “Walk Wright In” tours on Thursdays through Sundays from 11:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. for a fee of $7 for adults, $3 for students and seniors with identification, and $3 for children under 12 when accompanied by a paying adult. Special arrangements may be made for docent-led tours, group tours, guided tours, and other engagements by calling 323.913.4031. Click here for more information on the tours.
Frank Lloyd Wright's second prefab plan for Marshall Erdman & Associates sported a carport on the first level attached a large, open-plan living room. His third design for ME&A was never constructed. [Plans via the Frank Lloyd Wright archive at the NCSU Libraries]
Frank Lloyd Wright's second prefab plan for Marshall Erdman & Associates sported a carport on the first level attached a large, open-plan living room. His third design for ME&A was never constructed. [Plans via the Frank Lloyd Wright archive at the NCSU Libraries]
Girodo describes LEAPfactory’s architecture as being “molded according to the needs and stresses imposed by context.” In this setting, strong winds and snow loads are serious concerns. The shell’s composite sandwich panels and aluminum shingles ensure that the school can withstand the elements.
Girodo describes LEAPfactory’s architecture as being “molded according to the needs and stresses imposed by context.” In this setting, strong winds and snow loads are serious concerns. The shell’s composite sandwich panels and aluminum shingles ensure that the school can withstand the elements.
Distinguished as the only home in Houston designed by Frank Lloyd Wright, this masterpiece is an art collector's paradise. Ideal for both casual living and grand entertaining, this private residence features multiple art galleries, high ceilings, geothermal temperature system and the original built-in furniture.
Distinguished as the only home in Houston designed by Frank Lloyd Wright, this masterpiece is an art collector's paradise. Ideal for both casual living and grand entertaining, this private residence features multiple art galleries, high ceilings, geothermal temperature system and the original built-in furniture.
The Frederick C. Robie house seen from the south elevation in Chicago, Illinois.
The Frederick C. Robie house seen from the south elevation in Chicago, Illinois.

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