202 Living Room Recessed Lighting Standard Layout Fireplace Design Photos And Ideas

SHED replaced the windows with new wood units of the same style. Note how the shelving at the half-wall aligns perfectly with the window mullions.
The fireplace was painted white and now has a wood stove installed (not shown). "Once we got the wood stove, the room just came to life and became super cozy," says Jocie.
The most costly parts of the build were the board-formed concrete walls and fireplace. “We believe it was worth spending the money here for a few reasons,” reveals architect Cavin Costello. “The mass anchors the house into the landscape, and the material is incredibly durable—something we need in the harsh desert sun. The board-forms give the home a wonderful character.”
Crawford taught himself how to reface the brick fireplace façade, using a creamy-colored, thin set brick. “It was his first time using a tile saw or laying brick, but his meticulous precision paid off,” says Devlin.
The wood slat wall was a great solution for spreading light throughout the split-level and looks right for the era of the house. At $2700, it was also much more cost effective than Devlin’s original design of a metal staircase.
An aqua Malm fireplace warms up a corner. The pink, green, and yellow stripes now reach the skylights and extend over an integrated storage space to the floor. “My husband and I, we both actually hate having a TV visible to guests, but it’s a necessary evil,” says Shawn. “So how do you make that interesting and without it being too busy? [The rainbow stripe] creates an element that draws your eye away.”
A relaxed living room with outdoor access occupies the addition.
"We wrapped the roof in glass, so the interior is open, airy, and gets plenty of sunlight—something many tiny homes lack," says Mackay.
A curtain can be pulled shut over the living room windows to afford privacy when needed.
"The main challenge was making a space with a 250-square-foot footprint actually feel large," says Mackay. "The key to its success is high ceilings, eight-foot doors, and oversize windows."
The mezzanine level was transformed into a family room, leaving the fireplace pretty much as is. A painting by Anyeley’s sister, Addoley Dzegede, hangs over a Thataway sofa by Blu Dot. Above the fireplace is a Frame TV by Samsung, displaying a piece by San Francisco artist Barry McGee.
The walls behind the fireplace are 400-millimeter-thick rammed earth, and they were formed on site by a specialist contractor. The material not only provides thermal mass to protect the interior from the heavy heat load experienced in summer, but also heats up when the fireplace is in use in winter months to provide gentle heat release to the main living area.
The open-plan living area features rift-cut white oak flooring.
The rear wall with stacking sliding doors opens to surrounding decks and the "hero" view.
Floor-to-ceiling shelves and storage bookend a cabinet that conceals the television.
The pair replaced the cluttered firewood storage with a floating hearth that can double as a seat and display for art.
Raj and Watts extended the fireplace column to the ceiling to highlight the room’s expansive scale, and had it coated in concrete plaster. It was important to retain the wood-burning fireplace—a rarity in the city—but “we wanted to re-clad it in a material that also spoke to the industrial past of the building,” says Raj.
The light-filled living room features a Kasota limestone fireplace. The slab stones were “fleuri” cut across the grain for a swirl effect, then sandblasted to age.
A picture window over a custom concrete bench fashions a window seat. “Family, friends, and animals all enjoy the various places to relax in the lounge,” says the homeowner. “The window seat is universally the most prized nook in the home.”
An inset shelf is a decorative feature above the firewood storage. “We enjoy the low sun in the winter mornings and the toasty warmth from the Jotul stove, which heats the whole back of the house,” say the clients.
The Wilfred sofa from Jardan is covered in the homeowners’ other favorite color: indigo. It sits with a reupholstered Womb Chair in the new living area.
The fireplace surround was replaced, and the mantle and pilasters were removed for a more minimal, sleek appearance. The new marble kitchen bench was extended out into the living room to create a benchtop area in front of the window for dining and working.
The ceiling height was lowered over the seating area in the living room to create a cozy enclosure there, while double-height windows on the perimeter bring in yet more light.
A look back at the atrium on the left and the foyer on the right—sleek, built-in storage lines the entry on one side, opposite a two-sided fireplace.
The design team added new perimeter window openings to encourage light into the home wherever possible.
The wood-wrapped footbridge on the floor above defines the passage into the living room.
Art by Zoe Pawlak sits on the mantle with an Eames Bird from Herman Miller.
Cuddington had the drywall removed to reveal the house’s original structural framework, which in turn screens the living areas while also allowing visual connection with the front door. "Having the ability to just swap out [the drywall] and open it up gave the home a sense of arrival and a preface to the type of materials that were being used in the project," says Cuddington.
The entry between the living room and dining room was widened.
A coat of Dunn Edwards "Frosting Cream" brightens up the surroundings significantly.
Rossi kept important features of the old home throughout, such as the built-ins, fireplace, and original floors.
The project team excavated a portion of the backyard to create a sunken patio that seamlessly meets the grade of the interior living spaces. The interior flooring is large-scale honed basalt tile (24" x 48" in size), which becomes 24" x 48" flamed basalt tile at the exterior patio.
In the living room, a new faceted, blackened-steel fireplace surround is juxtaposed with leaded glass windows. "The existing portions of the house offer more formal and internal spaces for cozy entertaining and lounging," says Chadbourne.
Huge header beams and thickened walls allow for a generous opening between the living room and deck, with doors that recess into the wall cavity and a seamless meeting between the indoor floor and the exterior decking.
“I love the subtle design of the two fireplaces and I think my favorite part is the way light and shadow play off each other throughout the house,” says listing agent Chris Menrad.
LED lighting playfully highlights the zig-zag form created where the timber stairs met the wall.
The living room features a Cheminee Philippe wood-burning fireplace, which has a large heating capacity. By placing it below the void, it is able to heat both the downstairs and common areas upstairs.
This full-height bay window juts out of the home, allowing one to “step into” the desert scenery. Poles supporting the ramada pierce down into the living spaces, establishing a continuous connection between the two structures.
Boiserie panels made of zebrawood create a cozy nook in the main living area and also form a picture rail to display the client’s art collection.
Preda elegantly reallocated the space to contain a side-by-side living room and dining room area, with the latter defined by a custom Cor-Ten steel and zebrawood bookcase designed by the firm. The dining table is by Alepreda for miduny, the firm’s sister furniture company. The fireplace is an ethanol model, since incorporating a chimney wasn’t possible in the building.
Designed by Studio B Architecture + Interiors, this modern farmhouse in Aspen allows a couple’s art collection to shine with understated finishes and materials. Views and natural light were maximized via large spans of glass to instill a sense of airiness while the same wood used throughout the home added warmth. The minimalist interiors provide a muted canvas for their artifacts collected from travels to Africa and Indonesia, and art which includes 8-foot wooden sculptures, baskets from around the world, and Native American pieces including from R.C. Gorman.
The upper penthouse provides stunning city views from a terrace that extends off the living room.
This living room features a custom sofa and leather, brass, and hardwood armchairs by Atra Form. A cluster of coffee tables includes the Paloma painted steel coffee table designed by Pedro Ramirez Vazquez, a custom brushed brass side table by Atra Form, and the Telugu Suar stained wood side table by NAMUH.
Sitting in the shadow of the notorious West Hollywood hotel Chateau Marmont, the villa at 8222 Marmont Lane was originally built during the Golden Age of Hollywood in 1923. It was thoughtfully remodeled, and became the home of actor James Franco before he sold it in 2010.
The soaring tongue-and-groove ceiling has clerestory windows at the top for added natural light. The wood beams are continued into the outdoor space. Glass sliding doors run the length of the space, seamlessly opening the entire home for indoor/outdoor entertaining.
The living room has reflected sofas and plenty of shelves for the library of books
A hand-cut stone fireplace anchors one corner of the living room, which offers space for several seating areas. Long stretches of wall space also create the perfect canvas for displaying artwork.
Hufft Projects designed the blackened steel "fireplace wall," which includes a Lennox wood-burning stove and an entertainment center. Ample firewood storage is incorporated below the fireplace and television, with enough wood storage for over a week.
The living room retains the home’s original, poured terrazzo floors. There are oversize Fleetwood sliding glass doors on both sides. Most of the original doors have been upgraded to newer, energy-efficient glass, but their size and placement match what was original to the home.
Inside the guest house, exposed beams along the rafters create a barn-like atmosphere, which is enhanced by a double-sided fireplace. Large sliding doors provide natural air circulation and enhance the indoor-outdoor connection.
The house’s original asymmetry remains pronounced in the remodel. The custom island, over 11 feet long and made of fir with leather panel inlays trimmed with patina steel, was designed by Carolyn Woofter, and works to separate the living area from the enlarged dining area, which can now seat 16 people for dinner. The Cornogs commissioned the carving between the windows. It’s by Monica Setziol-Phillips, Leroy Setziol’s daughter.
The architects incorporated sustainably sourced parota wood into the living room’s sunken seating area. The Turn Tall side table is from Blu Dot, and the pillows are from West Elm.
Danish architect Jesper Pedersen reimagines a Lloyd Ruocco midcentury, putting sustainability at the forefront of the Scandinavian-inspired design.
The living area has a direct connection to the outdoors via a custom-made retractable wall of glass that leads to the backyard, a perfect spot for alfresco dining.
A skylight brings additional natural light into the open-plan living space. The gray, combed basalt fireplace figures prominently, as does built-in wood cabinetry.
The living space is anchored by an oversized, sculptural fireplace made from blackened steel by David Edelman. The design incorporates graduated rectangular tiers and is flanked by matching sound speakers.
The Modern Texas Prefab features a mix of natural and reclaimed materials for a relaxed feel.

The modern living room is one of the busiest spots in the house. It is where family and friends alike gather to share stories, watch movies, read, and unwind. As you'll find in the projects below, there are endless ways to configure a fresh living space with modern options for chairs and sofas, sectionals, end and coffee tables, bookcases, benches, and more. Innovative fireplaces add a touch of warmth.