110 Living Room Pendant Lighting Recessed Lighting Design Photos And Ideas

The original floor plan and design elements remain—from the concrete block fireplace to the restored sconces. The vaulted ceiling is made from western red cedar.
The new open-plan living/dining/kitchen space benefits from the raised ceiling height and the addition of the clerestory windows on the south, west and north sides.
The view from the kitchen.
The renovation opened the kitchen to the living space and added an island for increased prep and storage space.
Available in sizes that range from 1,291-sqaure-feet to 1,340-sqaure-feet.
The circular kitchen and dining area feels like part of the garden.
The open floor-plan is anchored around the original concrete fireplace.
When the husband-and-wife team behind Austin-based Co(X)ist Studio set out to remodel their 1962 ranch-style house, they wanted to update it to suit their modern lifestyles—as well as demonstrate the design sensibilities of their young firm. The original home was dim, compartmentalized, and disconnected from the outdoors. Architects Frank and Megan Lin opened up the floor plan, created an addition, and built an expansive back porch, using several reclaimed materials in the process.
Dawnsknoll optimizes the capture of natural light and cross ventilation, keeping down electrical costs. Interior/exterior courtyards, as well as the master and living room sliders, help circulate breezes. Sustainable heating is also introduced through radiant floor heating and domestic water heating throughout the house.
The fireplace feature wall has a concrete hearth, oak paneling, and wall-mounted cabinetry with pre-finished door slabs from New Age Veneers in the "Ravenswood" finish. A steel box integrated to the side of the fireplace stores wood, and glass walls make the most of the small site.
Sliding doors lead to the central courtyard, providing easy indoor/outdoor living and effortless entertaining.
To give the interior a more open and spacious feel, the team exposed the ceiling beams.
Verano-brushed 12x24 limestone flooring lines the great room. Ample glazing lets in plenty of natural light.
The front of the wall that separates the kitchen from this playroom is a chalkboard where the couple’s son can play and draw.
Floor-to-ceiling glass walls on both sides of the main living room allow sweeping views straight through the house.
Expansive walls of glass and sliding doors that lead to the large exterior patio create a strong sense of indoor/outdoor living.
A soaring ceiling delivers a sense of drama to the open-plan great room.
The living space in the open-plan kitchen/dining/living spaces flows out onto the south-facing terrace. The soft gray color scheme works with Cornwall's cool light and large skies.
Floor-to-ceiling Lift/Slide doors by Weiland and clerestory glazing usher the outdoors in to the open-plan living and dining areas.
Thanks to the expansive walls of glass, the living space absorbs a strong sense of the surrounding nature.
The bright and airy living room, dining area, and kitchen extend straight out to the wraparound terrace.
The screen helps to better ventilate the interiors. Shifting shadows cast patterns on the walls of the house as the western sun streams through the corridor.
Angled balconies at the first and second levels are accessed by floor-to-ceiling sliding doors, enhancing the indoor/outdoor living experience and allowing natural ventilation.
The open-plan layout is a fitting setting to embrace a minimalist, Scandinavian-inspired aesthetic.
The bright and airy interiors are a mix of lightly colored oak floors juxtaposed again dark fixtures and exposed steel beams.
A white beamed ceiling adds structure to the open and airy living space bookended by immersive views of nature.
Modern Danish design has informed the minimalist interior, which is dressed in cozy fabrics and a muted natural palette.
The glass entryway of the home opens straight into the living room.
The open-plan interior has been sheathed in light-colored wood to create a sense of enclosure, as well as an escape from the modern world. The low-lying exterior decks have been designed to not require railings, ensuring the sightline to the surrounding wilderness goes unimpeded.
The living room boasts original wood paneled ceiling and walls, and beautiful built-in bookshelves.
The upper level is home to the dining room, living room, and kitchen.
The view out to the garden.
living room and kitchen
Wraparound windows and sliding glass doors lead to the mahogany deck, giving the home a strong sense of indoor/outdoor living.
The opening to the dining area has been increased, and the square footage added to the original footprint has allowed for a grand staircase that now connects the lower level.
The floor in which the living and dining rooms are located on is made of reclaimed wood. The space takes on a midcentury vibe and has been furnished with pieces from Brazilian designers from the 1950s and 60s, such as Jorge Zalszupin and Sergio Rodrigues.
A cozy family room has been created off the kitchen, and includes a custom built-in breakfast nook and sofa.
In order to open up the space, Klopf Architecture took out some walls that were supporting beams. Klopf explains, “We used a structural trick by putting a cross-beam on the roof, which you don’t see. The ceiling now has an open, more expansive feeling—more post-and-beam.”
The use of wood softens the industrial feel of the concrete.
Terrazzo tile floors with solid brass are featured throughout the open plan layout. The cork inserts between the ceiling's vaulted beams were inspired by home's original design.
Since the original siding was in bad condition, they installed new vertical Western red cedar siding throughout the house, which is also reflected on both the interior and exterior. Klopf explained that one of the challenges of the project was finding a low-VOC stain that would match the color of the original siding.
An overview of the spaces.
The living room faces the rugged coastal.
The burnished concrete floor contains ten-percent fly-ash and slag.
A sectional designed by the residents joins a coffee table that Trey devised out of marble left over from a bathroom floor. The teak lounge chair by S.A. Andersen & Erik Andersen and Palle Pedersen for Horsnaes Møbler and the Jens Risom side table are both vintage. The painting is by Wesley Kimler.
Large south-facing windows by Loewen and a high-efficiency Rais X wood-burning stove help to reduce energy demands.
Recessed built-ins made of Douglas fir were milled by TJM Custom Interiors.
The family room has floor-to-ceiling windows which overlook the surrounding hilly landscape.
The front great room is intentionally public; the furniture-like wall (inspired by Mies’ Farnsworth house) creates privacy for all other rooms—even with no window coverings. No rooms have interior walls that connect with the outer perimeter of the house, echoing a design element of our 1958 E. Stewart Williams house in Palm Springs, CA.

The modern living room is one of the busiest spots in the house. It is where family and friends alike gather to share stories, watch movies, read, and unwind. As you'll find in the projects below, there are endless ways to configure a fresh living space with modern options for chairs and sofas, sectionals, end and coffee tables, bookcases, benches, and more. Innovative fireplaces add a touch of warmth.