165 Living Room Ceiling Lighting Table Design Photos And Ideas

Built-in seating maximizes space in the living room, and old pin-up calendars that were found on site have been framed as decor.
In the living area and kitchen, materials such as concrete and ceramic tiles were chosen for affordability and durability. The angled skylight above the living room provides a void in the slab that could be utilized for a stair or ladder should a third story need to be added in the future.
The open-plan residential floor has been designed so that it can be easily adapted in the future. The joinery between the bedroom and the living space offers privacy without completely separating the two areas.
Brooklyn-born painter Christopher Florentino sought a residence to house his collection of midcentury modern furniture that he’d started to amass as a teen. When he saw a Gene Leedy–designed 1963 ranch house on Instagram, he knew he’d found the perfect place. Nestled in Winter Haven, Florida, the Ellison Residence was teeming with all the elements of Florentino’s modern design fantasy including courtyards, local sandstone, glass walls, and a sense of indoor/outdoor living. He bought the house without even stepping inside. Now, it’s filled with the quintessential accents of the era including a George Nelson’s Saucer Bubble pendant, Eames furnishings including a LCW chair, Molded Fiberglass armchair, and Molded Plywood coffee table. He also maintained all original facets of the home from cabinets to door hardware down to the cork flooring; and even the palette plays to the era with primary colors and color blocking dominating the abode.
After two years at sea with their family of five, a couple continues their tiny house lifestyle by renovating a rundown Airstream.
When glass dominates a home, the result is a borderless residence that syncs with its environs, creating a stunning, new visual and psychological sense of space. See how these glass homes use the versatile material to create ambiance and connect with the outdoors.
The original home was slightly extended to the west on the ground floor to accommodate a stair leading to the new upper level and a large, floor-to-ceiling window that floods the interior with natural light. The blue paint used in the main areas is Dulux Capital Blue S34C9.
A cluster of Mixin Pendant lights from Australian lighting brand About Space introduces a sense of scale—and "adds bling"—to the double height stairwell. The house is known as Blue House Yarraville thanks to the blue feature walls used to define the extension.
The impressive living room has polished concrete floors which are contrasted with a white ash plywood ceiling.
In the living room, wall-to-wall windows frame views of the landscape to the east.
Unpainted plywood wraps all around the living areas to give the interior "a warmth and texture that interacts beautifully with the external Blackbutt timber," says Jackson. "It has a robust , durable, and tactile quality that sits well with the internal concrete floors."
To keep costs low, architect Mark Fullagar fitted this compact cabin with hollow-insulated plywood panels that lend warmth and texture to the interior.
Architectural elements like coffered ceilings and columns were added to the dining room to give the space the charm and character that is usually associated with older homes.
Reds, oranges, and wood tones blend to create a warm setting for gathering with friends and family.
The sunroom flows into a large living room, which features a dramatic cut sone fireplace as the central focal point. Timber beams also run along the space, complementing the warm hardwood floors.
The kitchen is open to the conjoined living and dining area, providing connection between all social spaces with unobstructed views outward.
The studio's wraparound deck can be accessed from all sides of the building.
Few changes were made to the living room space, which is warmed by natural light that pours in from clerestory windows along the rafters.
A black-and-white motif is warmed by wood furnishings in the master bedroom of Claire Benoist and Derek Kilner’s weekend retreat in Somers, New York. A Shaker stove by Wittus faces a vintage Pierre Chapo table. The windows are by Pella and the fireplace tool set is from Terrain. An Akari ball pendant by Isamu Noguchi hangs overhead.
Artist and corrective-exercise specialist, Ruth Hiller, moved to Winter Park, Colorado from New York knowing that her home would be glass and steel with wraparound windows. She hopped on the phone with architect Michael Johnson, he drew the sketch, and it took a mere five minutes to decide on the design. The common areas are suspended and cantilevered over the backyard ravine, offering views of a winding mountain creek while also doubling the square footage. A Bathyscafocus by Focus Creations fireplace warms up the modern abode.
What was once a poorly planned floor plan has transformed into open, brightly lit living spaces at the hub of the home.
Adding in live-edge details via countertops, freestanding furniture pieces, or built-in shelves is something that O’Donnell enjoys. "It’s fun to come up with uses for funky live edges and incorporate that into the design and still make it functional," he says.
A view down the aisle to the bathroom, with the kitchen on the left and the eat/work counter on the right. The Modern Caravan combined walnut cabinetry and red oak flooring, with white counters, tile, and walls.
The great room features floor-to-ceiling windows, a floating fireplace, exposed beams, lofty vaulted ceilings, and a multimillion-dollar view.
PITTA Arquitetura designed the large main living space with flexibility in mind. It is suitable for entertaining, yet cozy enough to serve as a personal retreat.
The cabins are holdovers from when the site used to be a KOA; Geremia Design renewed the interiors.
Bright pops of colored materials that are tufted and quilted are unique to GAN.
Double-height, steel-framed glass doors connect the entire home to its beachfront setting.
Full of chandeliers, the expansive living room also features hand-painted ceilings.
The home's main living space consists of a classic open floor plan, with beautiful exposed-beam ceilings.
Originally built in 1949 by Richard Neutra, Alexander Ban, and Josef Van Der Kar, the Millard Kaufman Residence is located in the Hollywood Hills of Los Angeles, California.
Full-height French doors lead from the den to the pool area.
Inside, the 4,043-square-foot property features reclaimed wood floors and beamed ceilings.
The sprawling residence opens itself up to the garden at every opportunity, allowing for a breezy outdoor connection.
The open floor plan, which blends dining and living spaces, is ideal for family or friendly gatherings. The 20-foot ceilings give the home a loft-like feel.
There is also a den with a wet bar that opens to a patio and a sculpted English garden.
In Lorne, Victoria, Austin Maynard Architects gave an old shack near the beach a modern revamp and a timber extension that allows for elevated sea views. With interiors lined in recycled Silvertop Ash, the house oozes a cozy, cabin-like feel.
A circular fireplace takes center stage in the living room.
A brushed brass fireplace surround subtly repeats the architectural curves. The bespoke ceiling fixture is by DH Liberty LUX, the lighting firm of Design Haus Liberty, and handmade by UK artisans.
"The idea of the building is to ‘hang’ it over the valley and open it to the valley by continuous windows," says the firm.
Leaving the ceiling unfinished adds to the material contrasts and saved money. Says Knight, "One example of a cost-effective strategy that also balanced the aesthetic qualities of the house is how we chose to forgo drywall on the ceilings. We paid more for the insulation to go above the rafters at the roof, but we gained this back in not using drywall and venting in the second-floor ceilings."
Sliding glass doors open up the living room to a private patio with water views.
The architects dropped the floor of the lower level to create 10-foot-tall ceilings. The existing den and master bedroom now serve as a media room furnished with an Eero Saarinen table from Knoll, Bruno Hansen chairs, and an Original Timber Co. bench.
"Higher ceilings and plenty of daylight were a must," say the architects. The ceilings in the living room are 13-feet-high, making the interior feel more open and welcoming.
Almost all of the furniture was created by Poliform, a long-time partner of the architects.
Pictured is the largest of the units, the "not-so-tiny home." Its two bedrooms anchor each end of the home, offering privacy. The homes feature 9-foot ceilings, and this unit can accommodate a king-sized bed.
The lower-level family room has a wet bar, a kitchenette, and doors leading to the backyard.
Berk melds inky tones with organic elements for a modern yet warm aesthetic.
The interior of the tasting room is outfitted with Eero Saarinen-designed chairs, North African rugs, Douglas fir siding, and a terrazzo floor.
As an architect who specializes in universal access design and ADA compliance and as a wheelchair user herself, Karen Braitmayer was no stranger to the challenges of accessible design. Although she had been able to take advantage of her 1954 home's single-level, open layout, as her daughter (also a wheelchair user) grew up, the family's accessibility needs also shifted. The main living area includes a more formal sitting area near the entrance, the dining area, Braitmayer’s workspace, and the kitchen—you can see the couple’s daughter working at the island. In the foreground is a pair of midcentury chairs; at left is a Heywood-Wakefield that Braitmayer found at an antiques shop. Seattle-based designer Lucy Johnson completed the interiors. The windows are from Lindal, and the exterior doors are from Marvin.
When set up as a rental unit, a KODA Concrete can accommodate two guests in the sleeping area and another two on a convertible sofa in the living area.
A view from the front of the Airstream towards the angled bathroom door in the rear. Note the small closet, perfect for hanging coats and boots, slotted between the door and the wood stove.
A wall of windows floods the living room and dining area with natural light. The room has been staged with Knoll dining chairs by Mies van der Rohe, a Platner Wire dining table, a Plycraft Lounge chair, and other vintage period-appropriate finds.
The living and dining area on the ground floor open up to a terrace.
The home's large windows offer expansive views of downtown Los Angeles.

The modern living room is one of the busiest spots in the house. It is where family and friends alike gather to share stories, watch movies, read, and unwind. As you'll find in the projects below, there are endless ways to configure a fresh living space with modern options for chairs and sofas, sectionals, end and coffee tables, bookcases, benches, and more. Innovative fireplaces add a touch of warmth.