96 Living Room Ottomans Concrete Floors Design Photos And Ideas

The upper floor wraps the main living space below, allowing for picturesque views from both levels of the home. Coffee bean tables by Holly Hunt sit atop a silk Tai Ping rust carpet, adjacent to a custom Living Divani Sofa.
The double height glazed living spaces allows for plentiful day-lighting and unobstructed views to the surrounding landscape.
The tongue-and-groove vaulted ceiling defines the living space.
Formerly the site of a French polishing company in the 20th century, this building in Clerkenwell, London, was converted by Chris Dyson Architects in 2015 into a residence with an expanded basement and triple-height living space that allows a dramatic feature staircase to take center stage.
The wooden beams on the ceiling have been left exposed to add warmth and color to the otherwise simple white color scheme.
Laurier Blanc acrylic glass Hekla Side Table & Stool, embedded with burnt wood truck, with accents of resin, compliments the Taylor Forest club chair, beneath the Amir Zaki waterfall photograph.
The lower level features a bonus family room with a wall of built-in media cabinetry.
The dining table and chairs were designed by Tim Sharpe.
An additional sitting area.
Traditional three-coat stucco was used for the interior walls. Furnishings are from Scott and Cooner and Urbanspace Interiors.
The next level holds a living/dining area with a powder room and entertainment area.
An entrance lounge and concealed laundry are located on the entrance level, where there is also a small lounge area with books.
Custom wood millwork, polished concrete floors, and some exposed concrete were used for the interiors.
In contrast to the bright interior colors that originally dressed the home in the 1950s, the Bergren Residence now has a more restrained and subdued appearance that highlights the material palette.
The apartment’s material palette—recycled wood, exposed concrete, terrazzo, and Japanese tatami mats—echo the colors seen outdoors, as well as textural memories from the country’s rural past.
Rich, barn-like wooden beams punctuate the sleek, airy interiors, adding texture and character. Pops of color from the bright pink sofas, combined with the hand-knotted rugs, add a sense of luxury to the polished concrete floors.
The layout includes an open-plan living room, dining area, and kitchen, along with one bedroom, and two bathrooms.
From the open-plan living and dining area to the adjoining bedroom, the owner can enjoy spectacular views of the sea.
A non-load bearing window wall—a characteristic feature of Usonian houses—dominates the living room.
Here, you can see the spatial interplay of private and public rooms across the plan from the main bathroom through the pavilion to the landscaped setting beyond.
Concealed internal retractable insect screens and external roller blinds are housed within fabricated steel head beams, which work in confluence with blinds concealed in upper soffit pockets to temper direct sunlight when required
The living room is anchored by a wood-burning stove. The sofas in this room are by Ligne Roset.
The concrete creates thermal mass in the home, and the large widows provide cross ventilation when opened. Together, these elements help keep the interior spaces cool and comfortable throughout the year.
The ceiling beams have been left exposed to create a stark contrast with the black framing.
The cool midcentury fireplace was designed in 1965 by Spanish architects Alfonso Mila and Federico Correa.
The new addition had to flow seamlessly into the more traditional spaces of the home.
Viridian '
Main Living Room
main living room space with custom curtain wall
living room and kitchen
Wooden ceilings ground some of the home's more industrial features in its organic setting.
"We are able to...take full advantage of the northern orientation, introducing passive solar design techniques, which allows the design to maximize its thermal efficiency," says MODO founder Michael Ong.
The couple snagged their Womb chair, a floor model, on sale.
Thirty-foot ceilings feature skylights for increased natural lighting. The walls are paneled in larch and provide concert-hall quality acoustics, and the floors are a polished black concrete.
A wall of windows frames the spectacular view of the lake and imparts a dynamic sense of place throughout the open-plan living area.
A Penobscot Bay swing hangs beside the dining table in the porch.
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Rockport, Massachusetts
Dwell Magazine : November / December 2017
A cozy corner of the living room has access to a south-facing outdoor area where the family enjoys dinner on warm summer days.
The starbust cedar wall was constructed by local carpenter Nathan Mcconnell.
Neutral furnishings and gray floors don't distract from the views.
On the first floor, solid steel plates transform into a perforated metal spine, which cuts right through the building to the top floor.
The glass lenses of the circular pavement lights are a common feature on London streets.
The use of the perforations throughout the home help to intensify the light through various aperture dimensions. They also led to the project's name: The Perf House.
A long sofa in the center faces a coffee table topped with a slab of elm that was designed by Moss.
Two sculptural wooden chairs face a wood-burning stove.
The burnished concrete floor contains ten-percent fly-ash and slag.
Full-height glazing and continuous material use allow spaces to flow freely from one to the other, and from inside to outside.
Rooms don't come with televisions to encourage guests to disconnect (but don't worry—there's Wi-Fi). Pool Suites come with a private plunge pool.
The wood stove is set within a blue, glazed brick socle.
The mezzanine level
The clients intend to retire to the house. They asked that rooms be constructed flexibly on a non-domestic scale. This one, with an Eames lounge and floor-to-ceiling glass windows, frames a serene mountain vista like a painting.
Though loads of natural light comes in from the courtyard, these large skylights also afford a view of the sky. The coffee table is from Modernica and the Eames Lounge is from Herman Miller.
A handful of modernist classics—an Eames Lounge, a Bubble Lamp by George Nelson, and a shell armchair from Modernica—kit out the living room and kitchen.
The long bench is made with the same white concrete as the roof.
The interior of the space is filled with natural light thanks to the vaulted ceiling. The owner's work space resides in an upper loft, a volume highlighted by salvaged wood panels.

The modern living room is one of the busiest spots in the house. It is where family and friends alike gather to share stories, watch movies, read, and unwind. As you'll find in the projects below, there are endless ways to configure a fresh living space with modern options for chairs and sofas, sectionals, end and coffee tables, bookcases, benches, and more. Innovative fireplaces add a touch of warmth.