357 Living Room Light Hardwood Floors End Tables Design Photos And Ideas

The main living area features a black pellet stove in the corner and a raw-edge, white oak window seat, which add rustic elements to the clean, bright space.
The couch swing was the last element of The House to be designed. "I wanted something comfortable and unique, but not weird," says Tarah. "In a stroke of genius, Drew suggested a couch swing." The piece was made by the couple in the garage just days before the first booking and is one of the guests’ favorite features.
The living area is oriented around a floating window seat crafted from oak. "We wanted a place for guests to comfortably sit, read, and reflect in the beautiful Colorado surroundings," says Tarah. "We sourced the perfect slab of white oak from a local mill. We kept the edges raw and used a light, matte finish that highlighted the natural beauty without it being over saturated. I wanted it to feel as unfinished and natural as possible."
Floor-to-ceiling glass doors that stretch 27 feet long connect the interior to the side patio.
The minimal interior lets the great outdoors take the limelight.
The Summer House in the Stockholm archipelago, designed by Kod Arkitekter, emphasizes a strong connection with the forested surroundings and exceptional sea views beyond. The architects achieved this by combining a Scandinavian cottage vernacular with a simplicity inspired by Japanese design.
A loft-like sleeping area on the fourth level lies just above the living room, which is located on the third level. Glass doors open to terraces on both floors and flood the rooms with natural light.
A Deep Thoughts Chaise by Blu Dot occupies a sunny spot by the new windows. The firm chose leather for its durability with regards to the owners’ two cats.
The firm furnished the home on a modest budget.
Le Whit created an airy first floor by exposing the framework at the ceiling. “There’s a lot of attention and pull to the structure, almost like the exoskeleton of the home,” says Curtiss. The fluted glass panel replaced a solid wall, adding transparency while still supplying structural support.
Wood tones and earthy textures warm the reimagined living room. Much of the art were gifts that the couple bought for each other or pieces by mutual friends; the Mickey Mouse painting is by New Jersey–based artist Dylan Egon. "We like to bring some of the city into the country," says Lauren.
The sitting room is an updated homage to the past that references the home’s history while keeping a distinctly contemporary vibe. "However, she did want to make one room that felt old," explains Yun.
A collaboration between YUN Architecture and interior designer Penelope August, a renovated, 19th-century townhouse with landmark status used to be an egg and poultry distributor. Now virtually unrecognizable, the parlor floor is the home's open-plan living area. A formerly defunct fireplace was reactivated and clad with a custom-made, limestone mantle.
A concealed door opens into the principal bedroom suite.
“The house went up so fast compared to a lot of buildings we do, because it’s such a simple design,” explains designer Tim Whitehill.
Hybrid stuck to a simple palette for the home’s finishes. “We chose to expose the roof framing to really add some warmth to the space,” says Humble.
The branches of the cherry tree can be glimpsed through the living room windows.
The simple living room features a wood-burning stove to keep the space cozy in colder months. The interior material palette was kept simple and practical. The ceilings and trims are pine, while doors are crafted from hemlock timber.
The mezzanine level was transformed into a family room, leaving the fireplace pretty much as is. A painting by Anyeley’s sister, Addoley Dzegede, hangs over a Thataway sofa by Blu Dot. Above the fireplace is a Frame TV by Samsung, displaying a piece by San Francisco artist Barry McGee.
Alex painted the wall behind the mahogany built-in unit the color Messenger Bag by Sherwin Williams, a green that echoes the foliage outside. The concrete side tables are from the Kreten Series by Souda.
Black leather West Elm sofas anchor the room atop a gridded Annie Selke rug.
"I always knew there had to be a sight line from the living room to the kitchen, all the way to the back of the house," says Alex. "That really opened up everything [like], ‘Oh, yeah, this is the way it's supposed to be.’"
The concrete hearth at the fireplace has angled sidewalls and a bevelled edge.
The rear wall with stacking sliding doors opens to surrounding decks and the "hero" view.
The kitchen is close to the living and dining spaces, yet also maintains separation.
The previous lean-to addition was kept, and the asbestos was carefully removed. “The original walls are smooth plaster with detail above the picture rail datum, in the cornices, and on the ceilings. The new work references this but flips it,” says Bokey-Grant. “The walls have a subtle texture up to a datum, and the smooth ‘hat’ above helps the spaces feel taller than they are.”
The home’s interior is a fusion of glass and reclaimed redwood, the latter sourced from a nearby decommissioned airplane hangar.
A deck just off the living room wraps a pool, while the roof provides cover for outdoor seating.
The owners are a young couple with two teenage boys, and they wanted their home to be fluidly connected to nature, as well as passively cooled (read: no air-conditioning). This was accomplished via operable louvers, large openings, and multiple indoor/outdoor spaces.
To extend the living room view, the architects used corner glass, eliminating the need to use a jamb or corner post that would have interrupted the landscape.
The light-filled living room features a Kasota limestone fireplace. The slab stones were “fleuri” cut across the grain for a swirl effect, then sandblasted to age.
The home is articulated along the ridge to command the highest point on the property, providing the clients with sweeping views across the rolling farmland.
A pink, modular Valley sofa sits with a green Kelly ottoman, both from Jardan, in the living room.
The home was gutted in the remodel, and the living spaces were oriented to take better advantage of the existing window plan.
The view from the kitchen is layered, first glimpsing a partial view of the dining room and the stained glass at the front exterior in the distance.
The colors in the furniture highlight the rich tones of the preserved stained glass.
With regards to the woodwork, "all of the new stuff that we added all have modern profiles," says Rausch, but their application recalls the home’s traditional roots. White paint marries new and old.
The family room on the second level.
The ceiling height was lowered over the seating area in the living room to create a cozy enclosure there, while double-height windows on the perimeter bring in yet more light.
A look back at the atrium on the left and the foyer on the right—sleek, built-in storage lines the entry on one side, opposite a two-sided fireplace.
The design team added new perimeter window openings to encourage light into the home wherever possible.
The wood-wrapped footbridge on the floor above defines the passage into the living room.
"We were influenced by Scandinavian style, but a white box with modern furniture would not have been right for us,” says resident Alya Shipilova.
A pair of vintage chairs and an IKEA side table provide a cozy place to sit in Vladimir Samsonov and Alya Shipilova’s St. Petersburg pied-à-terre.
A built-in couch defines the living room and provides plenty of seating for the family.
The open living area is light and bright, with flexibility integrated into the plan. A simple oak credenza provides minimal separation between the living area and the cooking/dining space. Large windows introduce plentiful natural light, while sliding glass doors draw in the garden. Oak paneling conceals additional kitchen storage space.
The fireplace has an energy-retaining flue and a glass door to prevent air and heat loss.
Park City Design + Build created this indoor/outdoor, energy-efficient home for a Danish interior designer and her family.
In contrast to the dark exterior, the interior of the main residence is dressed in a stark shade of white, complementing the original hardwoods lining the floor throughout. Various sized windows line the walls, inviting an abundance of natural light inside.
2020 is canceled due to the Coronavirus—but here’s your opportunity to take advantage of time spent at home.
Located in the center of Mexico City, the Cuernavaca House by Tapia McMahon entirely fills its site, closely abutting the adjacent streetscape. Upon entry, an ash stairwell extends from the ground floor to the roof terrace, acting as a sculptural element that connects all three floors. The striking residence has been selected for the RIBA International List for 2018.
A 15-foot-tall vaulted ceiling, a  clerestory, and a large sliding glass door flood the open-plan living area with plenty of sunlight.
A stepped drywall ceiling lends texture and interest on the interior. The open-plan public space, which includes the kitchen, dining area, and living room, is sectioned by a pair of box-like volumes that contain the two bathrooms; the two bedrooms are located at the rear of the house.
"When designing for a client or for a spec home, we design as if we were going to live there," Frank Lin says. "We look at what is comfortable for any kind of family to live in a space on a daily basis."
Generous cut-outs in the support wall connect the main living areas. The Togo couch and chairs are from Ligne Roset, and the sculpture is by Annie Morris.
An accent pillow isn't the only place where neutral palettes can get some color. In this Hollywood Hills living room, Pickens creates a cohesive palette by using the same shades on the walls, rug, and side tables.
The most important aspect of a successful neutral palette? "Texture, texture, texture!," Pickens says.
Designed by Atelier Du Pont, this breathtaking property exists in harmony with the surrounding landscape. Oriented in a manner that creates minimal impact on the existing terrain, the house idyllically nestles into nature, with vast views of the encompassing trees and vegetation. Inside, an orange Ligne Roset Sofa provides a comfortable space for rest and relaxation. A triangular window provides a picture of the tree canopy beyond, while drawing in natural light.

The modern living room is one of the busiest spots in the house. It is where family and friends alike gather to share stories, watch movies, read, and unwind. As you'll find in the projects below, there are endless ways to configure a fresh living space with modern options for chairs and sofas, sectionals, end and coffee tables, bookcases, benches, and more. Innovative fireplaces add a touch of warmth.