782 Living Room Concrete Floors Chair Design Photos And Ideas

In this sprawling ranch, every guest will have an individual experience. Each of the three bedrooms have been decorated with period furnishings and have a different theme. For a communal experience, cook together in the modern kitchen with quality appliances.
Eero Saarinen’s Womb chair is the star of the book-filled den.
This navy-blue velvet Ico Parisi–inspired Comma Sofa “evokes a water element, soft movement, and speaks to the history of the home,” says Masters.
A painting by Taiwanese artist James Jean is a focal point in the main living area, where low ceilings, common to architecture of the era, led interior designer Jennifer Masters to select furniture that sits at a lower height “without sacrificing comfort.” Bonus: unimpeded views of the pool.
The event center is illuminated by large skylights overhead. The space opens to an outdoor deck. The design is a mix of store-bought and vintage with kilim rugs and woven baskets hung as wall art "to add a cozy factor and texture to the concrete and wood space," says Morgan.
“We wanted to tie the living room together with a freestanding midcentury-style fireplace, which was a design collaboration between our team and Malm Fireplaces” says designer Taylor Bode. “When all of the bi-fold doors are open, you can sit in a circle around the fireplace both indoors and outdoors. It’s an integral part of the design that brings warmth and light to the corner of the house.”
The communal dining table in the main house was custom-made by a local woodworker and island timber mill owner, Joe Romano, in collaboration with WindowCraft. Raw metal supports for the table were fabricated by Salish Metalworks on Orcas Island, a sister island to San Juan.
The living room has a long, built-in couch with a custom midcentury-inspired fireplace. Polished concrete floors in the interior contrast with the outdoor timber decking.
The den offers a second living area and features a sofa from Cassina and a classic Womb chair by Eero Saarinen for Knoll. The artwork is by local photographer Ashley Garmon.
The living room has a glazed corner and a window that looks into the entrance courtyard. The Shaya table lamps are by Canadian brand Neuvo.
A vintage Bertoia Bird chair and Bertoia Wire chair offer sunny seating alongside the living room. "We love drinking coffee every morning in our window nook," says Tyler.
Floating wood shelves accent the fireplace wall and link to the nearby kitchen.
Removing the partition wall makes it so the entire living space benefits from the natural light that comes through the floor-to-ceiling glass in the living room, increasing the sense of indoor-outdoor flow throughout. A sofa from Article is joined by art from Lynne Millar for Juniper Print Shop and a vintage credenza.
“The clients’ main priorities in their lives consisted of: their kids, their friends, their food,” says the firm. “We knew we had to knock down the wall that separated the kitchen from the living room to create one big, open space - this immediately created ease of flow.”
The rear garden, visible from this living court, includes a vegetable patch, fruit trees, and lawn for plenty of play area.
Sparse built-in furnishings allow the spaces to be easily reconfigured for different functions. Within the first two years of living here, the owners have used the private courts as bedrooms, home offices, storage, and even as workshops for producing candles and soap for sale.
The outer courts are used for bedrooms and studies. Each has its own view of the garden.
A picture window over a custom concrete bench fashions a window seat. “Family, friends, and animals all enjoy the various places to relax in the lounge,” says the homeowner. “The window seat is universally the most prized nook in the home.”
An inset shelf is a decorative feature above the firewood storage. “We enjoy the low sun in the winter mornings and the toasty warmth from the Jotul stove, which heats the whole back of the house,” say the clients.
The Wilfred sofa from Jardan is covered in the homeowners’ other favorite color: indigo. It sits with a reupholstered Womb Chair in the new living area.
The timber screens outside can be rolled back and forth to control sun exposure, views, and privacy.
The glazed wall separating the apartment from the street was required, since the code otherwise requires the street front to be occupied by businesses.
As elsewhere, the floors are concrete and the casework is crafted of reclaimed sinker cypress.
In the living room, Piero Lissoni’s sofa for Living Divani joins a Lawson coffee table by Egg Collective and poufs from CB2. The blanket and pillows are from Muji.
In contrast to the building’s gray concrete exterior, the residence interiors feature bright pops of color from pastel blues to vibrant yellows.
The common areas are furnished with cozy, lived-in furniture.
The home’s modest finish palette is accented with pops of color. The deep burgundy carpet in the entrance hallway is mirrored by the sofa in the living room and accented by rich blue side chairs.
The fabric wall art and pillows in the living room are by Designwork, a zero-waste textile project crafted from recycled Eileen Fisher clothing.
An abundance of south-facing windows connect the double-height living room to the outdoors.
The Oostwouders wanted a home that was low-maintenance yet sophisticated. The interior is filled with materials that match the contemporary Hill Country aesthetic of the exterior.
"Lighting was orchestrated to move with the time of day, so that as the sun sets, the outside would be felt," says Peace.
Anodized aluminum-and-glass sliding doors are all that separate guests from the peaceful environs.
To help create the illusion of more spaces, the great room features a vaulted ceiling and opens up to the outdoors with 12-foot wall-to-wall glazed sliding doors.
The artwork is titled "Crashing Buffalo" and is by Tucson/Los Angeles artist Ishi Glinsky.
The Adrian Pearsall sofa was sourced from The Swanky Abode on 1st Dibs, and the fire tools are also from the Sunshine Shop, a local vintage store.
Translucent louvers in the maple-clad walls and a skylight cross-ventilate the room with fresh air and bring in daylight.
The backside of the dark-painted room for the music studio has shelving and display space for books and objects.
The wood-burning fireplace in the living room is vented through the warehouse’s sawtooth roof, sheathed in plywood above the living room.
The gaps in the slabs formed by the U-shaped pieces are filled with clerestory windows that add to the natural light. Here, the lounge is by BoConcept and the table is by Estudio Diario.
A look at the open living area of the prefab house in Canelones, Uruguay, designed by MAPA. The roof is made of precast concrete slabs more commonly used to build bridges.
Minimalist yet cozy, this cluster-style home in a Norwegian forest offers plenty of nooks to get comfortable in.
In the study at the top of the stairwell, a Nendo v132 lamp by Oki Sato for Wästberg joins a Togo chair by Michel Ducaroy for Ligne Roset. Theskylights throughout are by Royalite.
The stone fireplace and concrete floors add to the earthy feel of the home. The living room features a sectional by Focus One Home.
The mirrored "vault" not only reflects natural light into the interior, but also conceals an air conditioning unit, which needed a ventilated space to properly work. The lower part of the vault can be opened like a trapdoor for access.
Natural light floods the studio through a large window and is reflected into the mezzanine level via the mirrored "vault."
Concrete floors help to cool the open-plan living/dining/kitchen area.
A glass wall on the rear facade ties the compact home to the lush landscape and frames views of mountains, trees, and a lake.
David Liddicoat and Sophie Goldhill, the couple behind architecture practice Liddicoat & Goldhill, built their four-story, asymmetrical home topped with a steeply slanted roof on a narrow, irregularly shaped site within London's Victoria Park neighbourhood. It flaunts ample glazing and a mix of textures like exposed brickwork, stainless steel, and Rhodesian mahogany.
The main living space is open and bright with large openings that embrace the garden. An interior courtyard separates the main living space from a guest suite, which occupies the original front of one of the terrace homes.
Built with redwood, glass, red brick, and concrete, the house was originally designed by John Lautner for the Schaffer family, who used to spend time enjoying picnics under the resident oak trees. Lautner built the house horizontally around the oaks.
Krofchick describes the look as "Cali chic" with an infusion of ’70s spirit.
The open-plan living and dining room look out to the forest and pool through operative glass panels. The kitchen is partially concealed behind cabinetry at the far end of this space.
The neutral scheme allows furnishings to enrich the spaces.
The Loft Box is on the top floor of an ’80s walk-up apartment. The removal of false ceilings allowed Cheok to insert an attic that overlooks the living and dining spaces.
The house’s small size and compact footprint necessitated some clever spatial arrangements—like the hidden kitchen—to make the space feel bigger.

The modern living room is one of the busiest spots in the house. It is where family and friends alike gather to share stories, watch movies, read, and unwind. As you'll find in the projects below, there are endless ways to configure a fresh living space with modern options for chairs and sofas, sectionals, end and coffee tables, bookcases, benches, and more. Innovative fireplaces add a touch of warmth.