62 Exterior Glass Siding Material Gable Roofline Design Photos And Ideas

The smaller of the two existing buildings, this renovated structure houses two bedrooms. A glass overhang was installed above the passageway linking the historic structure with the concrete addition.
Pederson was thrilled to be able to keep the home's floor-to-ceiling glass walls—a feature not possible with new construction because of the Title 24 restrictions.
Constructed with wood and Perspex acrylic glass, this semi-transparent volume extends from the side of the main house, blurring the boundaries between indoors and outdoors.
This creates the appearance of a singular gabled house with opaque walls on one side and transparent walls on the other.
The width of the greenhouse volume is equal to the width of the enclosed  volume. "The greenhouse portion and the residential portion are structurally independent while complementing each other's functions," says Snark architectural director Yu Yamada, "enabling expansion, reduction, and renewal of the greenhouse section in the future."
The back deck provides the perfect spot for entertaining and enjoying the lush landscape.
The first task at hand was to open up and vault the ceilings. The architects added floor-to-ceiling windows, which allowed the home to take full advantage of its amazing views.
Lovely lines and heaps of character make this midcentury property a true gem.
The sheet metal roof and wood cladding of the new structure complements the smooth, shiny birch tree barks on the site.
In winter, the extension looks as if it’s covered in snow.
The ribbed texture of the facade echoes the whitewashed walls of the area’s rural barns.
The new addition consists of a white prism that rests atop a concrete pedestal.
“Floating Farmhouse” in Eldred New York is a modern five-room holiday rental home with a touch of old world charm.
The home is made up of four gabled forms: the main house—with an attached master bedroom suite in its own distinct volume (on the left)—an artist studio, and an attached three-car garage.
The north wall of the IST home functions as a cut-away, offering a peek inside an efficient yet cozy dwelling. Architect Peter Jurkovič built the home for a woman who had sold her flat in the big city of Bratislava and wanted something that reminded her of the village life of her childhood.
The Floating Farmhouse’s semitransparent addition has a roofline that matches the pitch of the original 1820s farmhouse. A porch, tucked under the side eaves, is cantilevered over a stream that runs through the property. Ikea loungers are illuminated from the interior by commercial gymnasium lights repurposed as pendant lamps.
The ground floor of the two-story structure includes a living room, dining room, and three bedrooms—all with en-suite bathrooms. It also features a huge loft area with an additional living space, bedroom, kitchen, and bathroom. Each level has an outdoor terrace, while the lower terrace has a barbecue.
The only clue to the property's past life are the train tracks which traverse the garden.
Designed by architect Tanja Rytkönen, Vista is a compact log home with a high pitched roof, and fully glazed façade.
The familiarity and warmth of the burned finish juxtapose the more contemporary fritted glass that wraps around the corner of the building.
The pitched, low-slung roofs of the kitchen and annex allude to their utilitarian function.
The addition is clad in contemporary-looking fritted glass and shou sugi ban—rustic charred wood—by Delta Millworks. Both materials contrast with the historic stonework of the original building.
Choosing not to make a big to-do of itself, this cottage blends in with its surroundings. A wall of glass on one end allows a merger of the outdoors with the interiors, while white trim leaves the appearance of a snow-kissed façade year-round. Berlin, Germany. By Atelier st Gesellschaft von Architekten mbH

from the book Rock the Shack, Copyright Gestalten 2013.
A glass house in Piedmont, Italy.
Large glass walls installed within a column and beam structure brings in plenty of sunlight, and frames spectacular views for Airisto.
Iniö has a high-ceilinged terrace, and is fitted with generous floor-to-ceiling windows in the living room and dining area that bring in plenty of natural light.
Built by a crew of three, the home makes a virtue out of being unfussy and straightforward. The north-facing glass wall under the gable, with a triple-glazed facade, doesn't require shading or insulation. The quick-to-build structure—which consists of just structural insulated panels (SIB) made from OSB panels with a foam core, and a concrete floor that retains heat—doesn't include any complicated systems or require much maintenance.
Project Name: Island House

Website: http://www.2by4.nl/language/en/
Project Name: ModHaus

Website: http://eastcoastmodern.ca/
Stephen Waddell and Isabel Kunigk worked with architect D’Arcy Jones to breathe new life into their “dank old” structure. The couple chose to sacrifice square footage inside in order to make the most of outdoor space.
View from pond.
On Vashon Island, about 20 miles southwest of Seattle, architect Seth Grizzle designed a 440-square-foot multiuse structure for his clients Bill and Ruth True.
Building atop the foundation of a previous greenhouse was a cost-cutting measure; it allowed the project to be considered a renovation and thereby qualify for a temporary tax reduction. Its traditional, gabled form also pays homage to the original structure.
The father of architect Greg Dutton wished to build a cabin on the family farm, located within Appalachian Ohio and home to 400 heads of cattle. Dutton, of Pittsburgh and Columbus, Ohio-based Midland Architecture, presented this design as his father’s birthday present in 2012. Finished in 2014, the 900-square-foot cabin operates entirely off-the-grid.
“I wanted more of a skeletal look for this house, and less of a chunky, log-cabin look,” says Panton, who added stark steel bracing across the entire length of the porch’s roof structure.
The family retreat abuts a rocky cliff in Herfell, Norway. The central cabin provides communal living spaces, while the two cabins that flank it are used as private sleeping quarters.
According to Remijnse, since the only direction they could build on the small site was up, they decided to add height with a gabled roof.
With one side of the house closed off, views are directed through the glazed south and west facades to the grassy clearing beyond. "We planted tens of thousands of blue bells and lots of rhododendrons," Oostenbruggen says of the green space. "The setting developed over time."
The house features one master bedroom upstairs, two guest bedrooms, and two separate guest apartments downstairs that Wynants rents out. “Farming has become a very difficult trade. Prices are historically low and agritourism is something invented to give farmers the possibility to have an extra income,” says Wynants, who grows hops on his land. “The formula has had huge success; in the last years the tourism capacity of this area has multiplied many times.”
“To be able to respect the ‘massiveness’ of the roof, making bigger windows would be wrong, because we would lose the character of the farm,” Wynants explains. “Therefore, I was looking for other ways to collect light. At this spot you had the big barn doors at both sides: This is the economical axis of the farm. This I kept, as my own design office is right under this volume. It keeps the sun out, so I have a splendid view when I’m working—I never need sun shades.”

Zoom out for a look at the modern exterior. From your dream house, to cozy cabins, to loft-like apartments, to repurposed shipping containers, these stellar projects promise something for everyone. Explore a variety of building types with metal roofs, wood siding, gables, and everything in between.