31 Exterior Glass Siding Material Curved Roofline Design Photos And Ideas

Organic lines mimicking those in nature can be soothing. Architect Tono Mirai, known for his "earth architecture," was inspired by the lush context for the design of this holiday home in Nagano, Japan.
The asphalt shingles that clad the exterior curve into the window openings, and an awning over the entrance appears to peel away from the facade. These details create the appearance of a skin wrapped around the entire building. The rammed earth walls are combined with seven-inch-thick wool insulation for thermal comfort.
The window and door frames are mainly crafted from cedar. They sit within the curved shell, which has deep eaves that protect the interior from the sun and reference traditional Japanese architecture.
The home is elevated about four feet above the ground to avoid moisture from the forest floor. The entire ground-floor living space opens up to a timber deck through sliding glass doors.
The home’s entrance is a timber door set into the “shell.” This leads into the heart of the ground-floor living space, which opens out to a timber deck.
The clients requested “architecture that is unusual, beautiful, and does not make you feel old in time.” Over the years, the timber and earth used to construct the home will develop a rich patina.
The shell is closed to the west and north elevations and open to the east and south elevations—an arrangement that responds to the location and orientation of the house in the forest.
The house's elevation was inspired by Paul Rudolph's nearby Sanderling Beach Club.
In the L-shaped home, one wing houses the public rooms—living, dining, and kitchen—and the other the bedrooms, with the master on the curved end opposite the living room.
The site’s views face south and the neighbors are to the north, so Edwards Anker positioned the thick, curved walls of the house on the northern side for privacy, while the glass planes capture the setting and ocean breezes. "It’s a very lucky orientation," says Edwards Anker. The house gains its name—Cocoon—from the curved walls.
An abandoned airport terminal at New York’s John F. Kennedy International Airport was reborn as the TWA Hotel, a stylish stay that harkens on the romance of flying when it was still a novelty. Paying homage to the original architecture of the 1962 building designed by architect Eero Saarinen, JFK's only on-airport hotel is complete with midcentury modern guest rooms, a 10,000-square-foot rooftop deck with pool, and immersive experiences.
Located in the woods of Malborghetto Valbruna in the Italian Dolomite commune of Tarvisio, this egg-shaped tree house appears to hover in midair like a giant pinecone.
The wood for the home was harvested and dressed from Bello's property.
Palau Sant Jordi in Barcelona
An aerial view of TWA Hotel.
This 1962 Eero Saarinen-designed landmark now holds the TWA Hotel.
Italian prefab company LEAPfactory built this alpine shelter off-site and had it flown in via helicopter. Cantilevered off the edge of a mountain, the structure features a living room, a dine-in kitchen, bunk beds, storage closets, and an integrated computer to keep mountaineers and climbers up-to-date on the weather conditions.
Skylodge Adventure Suites are luxury dwellings affixed to the mountainside in Peru's Sacred Valley, approximately nine miles north of Cusco. Visitors interested in staying at Skylodge must climb a quarter of a mile of protected trails and fly through the sky on zip lines.
The Gouter Refuge is located at 12,582 feet in elevation (about 3,280 feet below the summit of Mont Blanc) along the Gouter route. The four-story, rounded structure juts out over a 4,921-foot drop, and it's the last stop before the final climb to the summit of Mont Blanc. Commissioned by the French Alpine Club and designed by Swiss architect Hervé Dessimoz, the wooden structure is clad in stainless steel and took five years to design and three years to build.
La Vinya, PGA Golf Resort | Studio RHE
La Vinya, PGA Golf Resort | Studio RHE
The Wave House seamlessly combines solid timber with glass.
The sculptural roof appears to float above the glass-walled living space on the ground floor.
The master bedroom is enclosed on three sides, emphasizing the view outward, while the low-slung roof and deep eaves create a sense of horizontality. The bed, nightstands, and light shelf are made from white oak to match the floors; all were designed by the architects.
The smoothness of the poured concrete is strikingly juxtaposed against the rugged surrounding terrain.
The wave-shaped structure glows from within.
The simple stunning structure that houses the public restroom features a concrete ceiling that emulates the shape of a wave forming from the surface of the terrace.
Clad in SPF lumber, zinc, and glass, David Bronskill and Mark Dilworth’s vacation home on Oblong Lake fans out to capture wide views of the forest. “Nothing is straight in the plan,” says architect Roland Rom Colthoff of RAW Design, who conceived the 2,500-square-foot escape. From left to right, there are three structures: a three-bedroom guest wing, a voluminous communal area, and a semi-detached master suite. Two of the wings share an unusual fin-shape design because of their varied ceiling heights.

Zoom out for a look at the modern exterior. From your dream house, to cozy cabins, to loft-like apartments, to repurposed shipping containers, these stellar projects promise something for everyone. Explore a variety of building types with metal roofs, wood siding, gables, and everything in between.