72 Exterior Glass Siding Material Green Roof Material Design Photos And Ideas

The ground-floor living space looks inward to the courtyard and is protected on all other sides by the mass of the building and the blank brick facade.
A side patio leads from the front of the home to the courtyard. The same red bricks used for the facade have been used for the paving to create a seamless fabric that wraps the built form and the site.
The slim profile of the red bricks used in the facade creates a textured surface across the monolithic form, while red and brown tones of each brick create an organic, varied pattern of color.
The entire home is wrapped in a brick "skin" that extends onto the ground at the front and sides of the home. The entrance is found through a simple void in the facade beside a pond with floating vegetation that hints at the verdant interior.
The steel bridge—which echoes the design language of the steel brise soleil—extends from the second-floor study into the rear garden.
The deep brise soleil shades the interior as well and offers privacy from neighboring buildings without compromising the views.
Both the boys' bedroom and family room spill out into the ground floor garden, providing the children with an expanded play area outside of the house.
The two monolithic walls on the north and south sides are integrally colored, steel-troweled plaster. They anchor the home in its site as well as provide privacy from neighboring homes.
The home has large areas of glazing on the east and west facades. Given the small footprint of the home and the open floor plan, the entire interior experiences direct light in the morning and evening.
There is now continuous, stepped landscaping from one home to the next as the buildings and street rise up the hillside.
The green roof is planted with local succulents, including cascading pigface.
A Cor-Ten steel "sleeping volume" seemingly floats atop a predominantly glass "living volume." Intersecting these two stacked volumes is a double-height, timber box which houses the multipurpose spaces.
Bundeena Beach House connects the street and wider community to the water views beyond thanks to its low-lying form and a native roof garden, which the architect describes as a "green infinity edge."
Large timber-framed glass sliding doors open the kitchen/dining space to the rear courtyard on two sides.
The floor to ceiling glass sliding doors opens the living spaces to the surrounding waterfront and landscape
The firm worked to provide as much outdoor access as possible, so the living spaces spill out onto a protected veranda, and a ladder climbs up to the green roof.
The horizontal concrete assembly appears to hover gently above the landscape, touching only on supporting columns. Floor-to-ceiling glass provides transparency from outside to inside.
Floor-to-ceiling glass walls maintain important view corridors for the occupants.
Architect Richard Hammond and his wife, Daniela, a designer, saw their move to San José as a temporary adventure. But when they found an abandoned, partially built house on a beautiful sloping site, they decided to turn it into their dream home, putting down more permanent roots in the process.
A series of open and closed volumes, the house incorporates a range of materials, including local mahogany, standing-seam metal, shingled glass, and concrete. A green roof tops one end.
On the green roof, guests enjoy stunning panoramic views, a hydromassage pool, and a lounge area.
Set on a steep slope, the building features angled geometry that mimics the mountains and terrain.
The Continuous Extension exterior is defined by coarse spray plaster, large floor-to-ceiling windows, and larch banding.
The upper floor is wrapped in glass, with the exception of the solid wood front door and the cantilevering roof.
The 4,600-square-foot home is set on bucolic farmland.
The home's two volumes are distinct not only in their orientation, but also in their materiality. The lower level is wrapped in stone, while the upper level is composed of glass.
The new home is composed of two rectangular volumes stacked on top of each other.
The spa building behind the pool is topped by a green roof.
Exterior drone axonometric
Exterior within Context
La Vinya, PGA Golf Resort | Studio RHE
La Vinya, PGA Golf Resort | Studio RHE
IF House - Photo 16
IF House - Photo 10
The architects reused and enlarged the steel frame and ground slab to preserve the shed’s original form while cladding the structure in new materials sympathetic to the rural vernacular.
Walls of glass run up the east and west sides of the house, blurring the boundary between indoors and out.
The sedum green roof by Skygarden helps to manage stormwater.
View from Southwest
West Elevation Detail
View from Boat Dock
A concrete box.
The house ontop of the lake
Perched
A glimpse at the breathtaking views available from the home.
The upper volume—where the garage, kitchen, service areas, two bathrooms, and a patio are located—is a half-submerged body of stone set within the upper section of the slope.
Curves

Zoom out for a look at the modern exterior. From your dream house, to cozy cabins, to loft-like apartments, to repurposed shipping containers, these stellar projects promise something for everyone. Explore a variety of building types with metal roofs, wood siding, gables, and everything in between.