272 Exterior Glass Siding Material House Building Type Design Photos And Ideas

The ground floor of the two-story structure includes a living room, dining room, and three bedrooms—all with en-suite bathrooms. It also features a huge loft area with an additional living space, bedroom, kitchen, and bathroom. Each level has an outdoor terrace, while the lower terrace has a barbecue.
The only clue to the property's past life are the train tracks which traverse the garden.
In a small community with a common garden, FabCab built this prefab home incorporates high-quality materials like Douglas fir to keep the home from feeling clinical, despite its construction in a factory. The architects incorporated universal design features like flooring that wheelchairs can roll over easily and grab bars, making the homes appropriate for aging clients.
Consisting of three prefabricated units in West Seattle on a 5,000 square-foot lot, the units range from 1,250-1,400 square feet, each with three bedrooms and two and a half bathrooms. The generous glazing of the living rooms are set back from the exterior cedar rainscreen, and the rest of the facade is sheathed in metal panels. The ground floor was built onsite, but the upper two floors were prefabricated offsite in a factory.
Designed by architect Tanja Rytkönen, Vista is a compact log home with a high pitched roof, and fully glazed façade.
The starting price for a fully built 685-square-foot, two-bedroom Cubicco model in the Miami area is just over $115,000.
Stinessen placed each cabin carefully in order to ensure the best possible views and the right amount of privacy.
While you’re there, make sure to try out activities or sports that take advantage of the incredible natural surroundings. You’ll be able to rent a boat, kayak, snow shoes, a bicycle, or fishing and diving equipment. You can even sign up for a group fishing trip or have a chance to see the winter lights.
The cabins are made up of two layers of wood construction. The exterior layer is made of Larch wood with a custom glazing.
This boutique hotel on Norway's Manshausen Island is made up of four sea cabins—one of which juts out from a natural ledge. Each of them fit two to four travelers or a family of five.
A view of the extension at night.
The pitched roof reduces the extension's surface area to 12 percent less than that of a flat-roofed extension, creating a more compact building envelope—which translates to less material needed for construction and less space to heat or cool.
Floor-to-ceiling glass with sliding glass doors allow access to the decked outdoor space, covered by the roof's overhang.
In order to meet the project's requirements for both affordability and sustainability, Warc Studio paired glass with laminated timber fins constructed from arsenic free H3 treated laminated radiate pine—a highly sustainable resource locally-sourced from a nearby plantation.
A shiny mirror-clad shed greets guests as they approach the house.
Californian modernism informs the shape of this Minnesota residence.
The secluded site allows for a high level of transparency in the design.
The mirror-clad shed gives the property a sense of constant movement.
High, glazed walls bring in plenty of natural light.
Hard shell, soft core. The industrial exterior shell wraps up and over the warm interior of the great room.
A large window wall folds in to create a spacious deck that wraps up and over to become the roof and overhang of the home.
Daring volumetric distribution creates an intriguing, sculptural form.
The cavern-like space underneath the middle volume serves as a parking area.
The middle volume is the largest and most transparent of the three volumes.
The Case Study homes were built between 1945 and 1966 and were commissioned by Arts & Architecture magazine to create inexpensive and replicable model homes to accommodate the residential housing boom in the United States caused by the flood of returning soldiers at the end of World War II.
In order to save a Meiji-period machiya in Kyoto's Higashiyama District, four friends pooled together their resources and had the two-level townhouse renovated and transformed into Shimaya Stays—two beautifully simple apartments that are now available for rent.
The natural landscape becomes part of the architecture of Los Terrenos.
In the evening, the facade darkens as the sun sets outdoors.
The larger volume has a peaked roof and a mirrored facade.
The living lounge, dining and kitchen are located within the larger of the two volumes.
A lofty limestone and steel ranch in Texas was converted into a holiday rental home with a massive glass, screened-in porch.
Choosing not to make a big to-do of itself, this cottage blends in with its surroundings. A wall of glass on one end allows a merger of the outdoors with the interiors, while white trim leaves the appearance of a snow-kissed façade year-round. Berlin, Germany. By Atelier st Gesellschaft von Architekten mbH

from the book Rock the Shack, Copyright Gestalten 2013.
An exterior view of the International-style home.
The stainless steel column is set outboard of the envelope to allow for a corner opening wall system.
The taller mass holds the sleeping spaces, while the living and gathering spaces are located in the lower elements.
In order to take advantage of the sun, the outdoor patio, opening wall system, and lawn were located on the southern side of the residence.
Minimal materials allow the dwelling to blend kindly into the surroundings, while large amounts of glazing increase the connection between built form and nature.
A sheltered walkway  provides shade in summer, and admits the lower winter sun indoors to warm up the dark-dyed, glossy concrete floors.
The roof is continuous and rests on top of the structural stone walls.
Built with specially-formulated concrete made of volcanic ash, this micro-house in Tokyo maximizes space through vertical construction. 
When Tokyo-based architecture firm Atelier TEKUTO received a brief from their clients to build a distinctive, environmentally-conscious concrete home, they embarked on a two-and-a-half year journey of spacial and material exploration. Built in 2015, the result—the R Torso C project—recently won the Overall Excellence Award and first place in the low-rise buildings category at the 2017 American Concrete Institute Awards.
At night, the home glows like a glass jewel box.
Outdoor walkway to the master bedroom
The configuration of the home is playful in plan, yet allows the structure to create minimal impact on the surrounding topography.
Large spans of glass look out on the surrounding lush vegetation.
Bold and bright colors on the interior pop against the subtle tones of the exterior.
Slanted roof planes create opportunity for drawing daylight in further, while creating a sculptural architectural form.
The house and its surrounding
Front facade of the house
Living room at night

Zoom out for a look at the modern exterior. From your dream house, to cozy cabins, to loft-like apartments, to repurposed shipping containers, these stellar projects promise something for everyone. Explore a variety of building types with metal roofs, wood siding, gables, and everything in between.

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