94 Exterior Metal Roof Material Wood Siding Material House Shed Roofline Design Photos And Ideas

At just under 3,000 square feet with three bedrooms plus an office, this home follows the basic plan of Stillwater's sd-161 design. It also features a separate guest house with two bedrooms.
Clerestory windows bring in daylight, supplemented by museum-quality lighting, to highlight the homeowner's art collection.
Based on Stillwater's sd-133 plan, this home has 2,300 square feet of space with dramatic ceilings (over 12 feet high) and no interior load-bearing walls. The home also features Stillwater's signature butterfly roof.
Sustainably sourced, radially sawn silvertop ash clads the exterior and will develop a gray patina over time. The architects wanted to celebrate the timber’s rough grain.
A south elevation view of the home. The southern porch, which faces the river, is the "extroverted" courtyard, while the northern courtyard offers a more intimate and "introverted" feel.
For O’Reilly, paring the design back to a minimum was important from both an aesthetic and budget standpoint.
The roof overhang provides protection from solar heat gain and the elements.
Salem, Oregon-based Ideabox approaches prefabricated homes from a modern and sustainable point of view, seeking to build prefab residences that are beautiful, efficient, and affordable. With 9 basic types that can be customized, the homes start at 400-500 square feet and reach about 1,600 square feet. Each home is built with open-web engineered trusses, insulation with high R-values, dual pane low-e windows, and EnergyStar-certified appliances.
The gently sloping nature of the block generated a step in the house levels,  which O’Reilly used  to delineate living and sleeping zones.
The galvanized steel frames, visible from both the interior and exterior, create a repetitive rhythm along the north and south elevations.
Steep street. Original garage door and wooden louvers.  New third floor glass louvers.
View of entry in evening
Front House
Kanuka Valley House by WireDog Architecture
An aerial view of Casa JB shows its three volumes.
The home is clad in sustainably sourced spotted gum. A natural material palette is used throughout.
Abercorn Chalet by Guillaume Kukucka and Tux Creative
The cabin’s concept was simple: To create a cabin that is small and sparse yet spatially rich. The 55-square-meter (592-square-foot) cabin, commissioned by a private client and completed in 2016, comprises a large living room, bedroom, ski room, and small annex with a utility room. It functions off the water and electricity grids.
Planning regulations required a gable roof, which the architects split into four shed roofs carefully designed to respond to heavy snow shed and meet spatial and aesthetic wishes.
"The 900-square-foot cabin perches on one piece of granite, projecting precariously over a steep drop-off to afford dramatic eastern views across the valley below," says Isamu Kanda, principal at I-Kanda.
The flexible floor plan caters to the clients’ love of entertaining. This private study, for instance, can be easily converted into a bedroom.
The master bedroom faces the east to capture the morning sun.
The main living space opens up via full-height, glazed sliding doors to outdoor courtyards on the northern and southern sides.
The entrance is located between the two volumes, which are oriented in slightly different directions.
The first volume contains the living areas, while the second contains two bedrooms.
The Kustavi has a monopitch roof, high windows and ceilings, two sheltered terraces, and a master bedroom with either a tall panoramic window, or a sliding door.
“At night, the chalet is transformed. When it is dark, the mirror effect of the reflection of the interior space in the windows completely changes the cabin’s relationship to its site and makes it appear larger,” adds Rasselet.
La Binocle is segmented into two volumes that reach outwards towards the tree canopy.
The renovation literally raised the roof, increasing the interior ceiling height and allowing for the addition of clerestory windows.
Located in Sierra Madre, California, an existing ranch home with clean architectural geometry, was transformed into a contemporary home with an expanded open floor plan, improved circulation and access, and carefully placed clerestory windows. On the exterior, revised garage orientation eliminates excessive driveway paving and reestablishes the front yard as usable space.
"It is so beautiful around here with the wildlife and the vegetation—the less disturbed, the better," says Axboe.
The house was designed to seamlessly integrate into its surroundings. It is conceived as a "looking box" to the mountain ranges, with ample outdoor decks and patios to enjoy the views.
The deck projects out toward the beach.
A view of the main home's sheltered entrance with the annex to the right. All buildings feature continuous exterior insulation.
This annex houses a large recreation room as well as a guest suite.
A dramatic cantilevered roof helps mitigate unwanted solar heat gain while inviting in warm winter light.
Completed for an approximate cost of $2,000,000, the modern, net-zero home features 3,835 square feet and is located in the heart of Suncadia’s master-planned community.
To recall the region's past as a historic mining town, a rustic palette of mostly natural materials were applied to the home, including stone, Cor-ten steel, and reclaimed barn wood with modern detailing.
Inspired by tatami mats, the spacious rear deck comprises a series of cascading platforms built from Alaskan yellow cedar in alternating patterns and supported with low, board-formed concrete walls. The glazed doors along the east-west axis also frame views of the Marin Hills that can be enjoyed from the rear deck.
Beautiful views of the Buddha statue and lagoon can be seen in the approach to the front entrance flanked by Japanese maples. The homeowners often leave the rear LaCantina  doors wide open for continuous indoor/outdoor connection.
Located an hour north of San Francisco, the vacation home embraces views in two directions: the Marin Hills and a marine bird sanctuary to the east, and the sparkling waters of the Bolinas Lagoon to the west.
As its name suggests, the house rests upon wooden stilts, which passively cools the interiors.
Exterior Dusk Shot
Exterior - Front
The roofs are made of corrugated aluminum, and the timber sidings used at the entrance are repeated on key ceiling planes.
At the back of the property is a deliberately understated entrance, and a simple canopy that shelters the front door. This door opens onto a landing, from which a broad corridor follows the natural gradient alongside a generous garden courtyard.
"This distinctive sheltering shape is again expressed in the wrapped floor-wall-roof profile of the three wings, which—assembled together, one above the other—track the site as it slopes toward the water," says Philip Olmesdahl.
The owner wanted a cozy family escape with plenty of outdoor entertaining areas.
Tall, slender teak trunks are secured to the ground with the weight of adobe bricks—a material that’s commonly used in the area—to support the walls and roof.
The communal area is fitted with wooden sliding doors, which open to connect the space seamlessly with the surrounding garden.
"The forms interpret the township’s alpine setting using height, volume, and pitch to create a dynamic experience as one moves between buildings and between internal spaces," says Allfrey. "Openings are carefully placed to ensure a casual connection between buildings."

Zoom out for a look at the modern exterior. From your dream house, to cozy cabins, to loft-like apartments, to repurposed shipping containers, these stellar projects promise something for everyone. Explore a variety of building types with metal roofs, wood siding, gables, and everything in between.