151 Exterior House Building Type Shed Roofline Design Photos And Ideas

A close-up of the black-weathered zinc cladding. Angled walls and an opening in the eave preserves the mature trees on the site.
Hard shell, soft core. The industrial exterior shell wraps up and over the warm interior of the great room.
A standing seam metal roof wraps down the exterior wall of the home to protect against the harsh winds of the terrain.
A large window wall folds in to create a spacious deck that wraps up and over to become the roof and overhang of the home.
The site needed a path that would let residents easily ascend from the bank to the house. The architects created one by simply replicating the way they had naturally walked up the site the first time they visited. The result is a meandering trail that directs visitors to the landscape’s different features — whether a majestic Arbutus tree, a private stone beach, or a wildflower clearing.
Grays and oranges compliment the natural tones of the site.
The stainless steel column is set outboard of the envelope to allow for a corner opening wall system.
The taller mass holds the sleeping spaces, while the living and gathering spaces are located in the lower elements.
In order to take advantage of the sun, the outdoor patio, opening wall system, and lawn were located on the southern side of the residence.
Minimal materials allow the dwelling to blend kindly into the surroundings, while large amounts of glazing increase the connection between built form and nature.
North of Sydney on Dangar Island is a modern Australian vacation rental that's positioned to take full advantage of views of the Hawkesbury River and gorgeous native Angophora trees.
A wide, open-air, stone-paved corridor connects two volumes.
The configuration of the home is playful in plan, yet allows the structure to create minimal impact on the surrounding topography.
Large spans of glass look out on the surrounding lush vegetation.
Bold and bright colors on the interior pop against the subtle tones of the exterior.
Slanted roof planes create opportunity for drawing daylight in further, while creating a sculptural architectural form.
Living room at night
With the majority of the house's windows facing down the slope, not only does Bornstein maximize the views out, but he assured that his home would have loads of natural light pouring in, even if it only lasts for a few hours in winter.
Exterior view showing warped roof plane over living space
Exterior view showing meadow in front of the house and Goat Wall behind the house
Exterior Detail
This  house in Three River, California, has no Internet or television, which makes it ideal for a digital detox.
Nic Lehoux
Available in sizes that range from 646-square-feet to 850-square-feet, this model has a sheltered terrace at one end that’s great for outdoor barbeques or a summer kitchen.
The Kustavi has a monopitch roof, high windows and ceilings, two sheltered terraces, and a master bedroom with either a tall panoramic window, or a sliding door.
The lake-facing side of the house is fitted with floor-to-ceiling glass windows.
The house dips down the slope, creating the impression of house that’s half sunk into the ground.
A home designed by Quebec-headquartered studio MU Architecture.
Cor-Ten steel acts as the primary exterior material.  Subtle design features in the steel paneling of the guest wing create notable results; every other panel is slightly offset to create visual and unexpected interest.
The driveway entrance introduces the stately side of the home, displaying clean lines made of concrete and Cor-Ten steel.  Almost every material implemented in this home was done so to create a maintenance-free space that withstands the weather and betters with age.  The design required minimal alteration of the site, a notable accomplishment in land preservation.  To maintain the natural grade, the structure is elevated and cantilevered at the slope, held up by columns which needed only a small amount of foundation work.  The only major land disturbance occurs in the recessed garage, which has been supplemented with a green roof on top to preserve the meadow.
Dynamic rooflines create interesting forms while simultaneously opening clerestory windows perfect for letting in natural light to each studio.
The main house includes a generous amount of outdoor space, extending the living area into the surrounding forest.
With a construction budget of less than $200 per square foot, architect Les Eerkes (with the mentorship of Tom Kunding) looked for ways to build the structure efficiently. He specified glulam—glued laminated timber—for the structure and spanned the skeleton with structurally insulated floor and roof panels. The structure is stationed atop a six-column foundation. "The 'six-footed' solution was balanced against a spread footing and stem wall approach," Eerkes says. "Cost analysis led us in the direction of the column footing approach because it minimized excavation and form work costs."
This modular prefab by London practice RDA Architects in collaboration with prefab and modular builders Boutique Modern is clad in Shou Sugi Ban timber with fit-outs selected by the owner.
Terunobu Fujimori's original Charred Cedar House is an example the respected architect’s ecologically sensitive and energy-efficient approach to architecture. “As an architect, I deal with the visual effects. Energy conservation is an engineer’s work. My intention is to visibly and harmoniously connect two worlds—the built world that mankind creates with the nature God created,” says Fujimori.
West Facade
The structure is divided into two solid vertical volumes connected by glazed living areas. The cedar cladding and steel panels reflect the hues of the surrounding forest.
To install Charles Willson’s prefab house, Stillwater Dwellings lifted the structure over an existing barn on the one-acre property. Willson, who is often on the road, wired the house with the latest in smart technology.
The cantilevered sleeping loft posed a structural challenge. "The structure is simple, however we explored a number of options for supporting the cantilevered loft," Eerkes says. "But after comparing costs for large trusses versus a big glulam beam—including labor costs for construction of each—the simplicity of a two-foot glulam beam won out. The steel rod cross bracing provided lateral stability in the longitudinal direction."

Zoom out for a look at the modern exterior. From your dream house, to cozy cabins, to loft-like apartments, to repurposed shipping containers, these stellar projects promise something for everyone. Explore a variety of building types with metal roofs, wood siding, gables, and everything in between.

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