358 Bedroom Bed Concrete Floors Design Photos And Ideas

In the house’s single bedroom, a queen-size bed sits on a platform constructed by local woodworkers.
The bed linens are from Luuna and the pendants were designed by Claudio Sodi.
In the master bedroom, Leger bedside tables by Rodolfo Dordoni for Minotti sit alongside a Lifesteel bed by Antonio Citterio for Flexform in the master bedroom. The linens are by Coyuchi. Glass sliders lead to a large deck.
The curving white wall in architect Jay Atherton’s bedroom is optimally sited to capture shadows from the redbud tree outside his window. The bed rests on a concrete floor. "It was important that the rooms be pure spaces," says Cy Keener, a carpenter, who helped design and construct the spartan home in Phoenix.
One of the tricky things about low bed frames is that bed linens are designed to hang off the mattress, usually down past a box spring. So if you’re letting your mattress rest directly on the floor or are placing it on a platform bed, you'll want to let the sheets and covers flow evenly onto the platform so that it looks considered, yet casual.
If you’re considering forgoing the bed frame entirely, make sure it looks intentional rather than haphazard. Install light fixtures at a level that is appropriate for the low-lying bed, and keep big pillows away from overhead artwork or windows.
The master suite, a box within a box, includes a walnut feature topped with another Polygal panel.
Stefanie says the tiny house has become a refuge during shelter-in-place orders: "It's nice to have another place to go to. I can visit mom's house."
Irmhild Liang stands in front of the Murphy bed, made by Resource Furniture, in the living area of her tiny home. "Because we were designing for someone in their 80s, accessibility had to be acknowledged," Stefanie Liang Chung says. "We were worried about the Murphy bed, but she tested it out, and she can do it on her own."
A guest room off the kitchen provides shared light to both spaces.
The Min Bed from DWR sits across a dresser from HD Buttercup in San Francisco. The rug is from Crate + Barrel, and the ceiling fan is by Haiku.
Another piece of furniture designed by MOS.
The folding metal walls, which cast light and shadow onto the concrete floor, are as dynamic as they're eye-catching.
Mosquito nets suspend from the corrugated metal ceiling and provide protection from natural elements while resting or sleeping.
Sopeoglou wanted the olive tree branch cutouts in the metal siding to create the feeling of sitting beneath an olive tree.
Metal closets separate the bedroom-and-living area from the kitchen and the bath.
The bedroom, which also acts as a living room, features metal closets on the western elevation that provide siding as well as storage space. The green-painted metal panels on the northern elevation fold open to views of rolling hills.
The bedrooms open up to the landscape for a tree house–like feel.
A trio of red sconces above the bed in one of the bedrooms underscores the house’s geometric quality.
Twin beds flank a mountain view in one of the bedrooms.
The master features a Haiti Home headboard, West Elm side tables, TRNK light, Parachute linens, and a Block Shop Textiles throw.
The master suite has a northerly aspect through staggered windows that cleverly frame or obstruct views. This is the most private of the three pavilions.
The boys’ bedrooms have loft beds that create play spaces below. As a result, their toys are stored and used in their bedrooms instead of shared living spaces.
“The master bedroom’s midnight blue ceiling is extremely seductive and calming,” says Spencer. “I genuinely encourage people to explore options that are a little out of the box.”
Opposite the bed is the generous bathroom, accessed through fluted glass sliding doors.
The white palette brings tranquility into the master bedroom. The loftiness of the ceiling continues here, with highlighted beams to continue the industrial aesthetic.
A sparse bedroom on the home’s second floor.
The master bedroom offers a bird’s-eye view  of Wildcat Mountain to the west.
The master bedrooms are within the smaller of the two gables.
designed by Estúdio Minke
Lago Vista by Dick Clark + Associates
Like all the interior rooms, the furniture elements in the master bedroom have been built into the architecture, making efficient use of the compact space.
The home has a master bedroom and a bunk room with four beds. The clients' two daughters enjoy completely disconnecting from technology when spending time in the weekend retreat.
Glass walls and a concrete deck connect the guesthouse to Sonoma’s lush landscape.
Sunlight pours through glass walls and washes over the interior's smooth, poured-in-place concrete walls, floors, and ceiling.
The reclaimed timber flooring was also used on the ceiling of the master bedroom, where it’s painted white to brighten the space. The single window in the bedroom provides natural light for the private spaces.
The private spaces in the main apartment—the bedroom, bathroom, shower, and walk-in wardrobe—are arranged in a single, open space. The custom bed was designed by La Firme.
Lookofsky outfitted the bedroom with built-in pine plywood bunkbeds, walls, and a ceiling. The bathroom and a closet are also wrapped in plywood.
One of five bedrooms in the mains residence, the master bedroom features custom-designed furniture and a wrap-around glass walls. The numerous bedrooms make the property attractive for use as a vacation rental.
The picture window in the bedroom frames one of two trees on the site.
Master bedroom
The master bedroom features a Nakashima bed, bench, and coffee table with a Lauki bedside table.
The spacious bedroom is neatly tucked behind glass walls, offering a quiet place of refuge. In the distance, stackable laundry units and storage separate the bath from the walk-in closet.
Underfloor heating adds warmth to the home's exposed concrete flooring.
Concrete blocks are "very cheap and easy to build with in these small geometries," says João Paulo.
The upper bedroom opens onto a grassy balcony that’s protected by a cantilevered roof.
A lime green-painted concrete floor makes for a vibrant bedroom.
An angular window lets occupants in the bed look into the treetops.
A cabin interior balances a spare Scandinavian aesthetic with warmth.
Inside one of the cabins, flaunting built-in seating that is perfect for reading.
Many of owner Ben Kinmont's culinary craft projects are an extension of his work as an artist and dealer of antiquarian books about food and wine. Off the kitchen, Ben stores his inventory—faded spines lined up on long shelves and a tall cabinet where a few select objects are kept. Next to a gaping fireplace in the sitting area is the most prized and frequently used of his antique cooking implements, an 18th-century French tourne-broche à poids—a delightfully analog contraption for turning a spit over a flame. In the master bedroom, more shelves were installed to accommodate the book collection.
A 2009 neon piece by Adair hangs over the bed. "The design of the house doesn’t inform my work, but perhaps gives me a supporting space to hang artwork or visualize the clean spaces that I intend my work to hang in," says Adair. "As an artist, to have clean lines and white walls with natural light is a dream to test hang work."
The master bedroom accesses a private, secluded courtyard.
The ceiling is exposed corrugated metal salvaged from the old house’s pitched roof and reused as decking for the concrete slab overhead. The space also features a Jessie Velvet armchair from Altea Design, a Dune pouf by Kare Design, and a Quinn wool rug from Crate & Barrel. Outside, a hammock beckons.
All three bedrooms are on the lower level. In the master, furnishings include a platform bed designed by Richard and Daniela and fabricated by Manuel Leon.
A look at one of four double-height bedrooms in the tallest structure. Each one comes with a “tapanco,” or loft, for sleeping or reading.
At one corner of the expansive space, near the living room, a more intimate bedroom space is created by a simple wardrobe structure. The room is open on two sides, framing 180-degree views of the landscape and creating a connection with the outdoors just steps from the bed.
Karen and Stephen made their bed using wood from an old weathered deck. A quilt by Karen hangs above it. The wall lamps are by Artemide, the bedcover is from North Shore Linens, and the antique bench is from China.
The bed in the master suite, which features views of the verdant surroundings, is dressed with white linens. The bedside tray table by Cult Design is from Hay.

Perhaps the room that most reflects our personality is the bedroom. It's an extension of ourselves, and there are endless opportunities to personalize, decorate, and reconfigure it to better express our individual tastes. These modern bedrooms are furnished with well-designed beds, dressers, night stands, chairs, wardrobes, and storage options—and exhibit trends in lighting and flooring.