Tin House

London, England, United Kingdom
Architect
  • Henning Stummel Architects
Photographer
  • Timothy Soar
Publications
  • Location
  • London, England, United Kingdom
  • Structure
  • House (Single Residence)
  • Type
  • Modern
  • Six earth-colored, metal-clad pavilions are combined to create Tin House, an innovative and voluminous house that boasts a secluded rectangular pool in a bright interior courtyard.
    Designed by London practice Henning Stummel Architects, the facades and pyramid-top roofs of the six interconnected pavilions were constructed with GreenCoat PLX BT steel that was painted fire-engine red. The reflection of the light from the pool against the surface of the red steel accentuates the structure’s monolithic, utilitarian character.

    As a building product that’s been developed by expert tinsmiths according to a patented bio-based technology, this formable steel material is workable even at temperatures down to five degrees Fahrenheit—making it possible to build with it year-round. And because it has almost no spring back, it can be folded very tightly during construction.

    Also keeping energy-efficiency in mind, the pavilions are super-insulated and relatively airtight. It also features a heat-recovery air system that keeps the house working efficiently and comfortably throughout the colder months.

    Within each pavilion of Tin House is a room with high ceilings and generous skylights. The bathrooms and stairs are located within the capacious double walls that link the pavilions.

    The low contour of the roof maximizes the spatial volume of the house and the amount of natural light flooding in through the wide skylights. This results in interiors that are imbued with an almost pastoral ambience that draws in the cool air from the pool.

    Inspired by the works of American light-installation artist James Turrell, Tin House is a well-considered design that makes the most out of space and light.