Collection by Luke Hopping

Tiny, Minimal Homes

Small-living and minimal design go hand-in-hand in these understated homes.

Architect Lidija Dragisic of Studio 360 introduced sculptural custom built-in shelves and minimalist furniture to this 1,000-square-foot apartment in Ljubljana, Slovenia. "The goal is to make small areas look and feel big, and to be as useful as much bigger spaces are," she explains.
Architect Lidija Dragisic of Studio 360 introduced sculptural custom built-in shelves and minimalist furniture to this 1,000-square-foot apartment in Ljubljana, Slovenia. "The goal is to make small areas look and feel big, and to be as useful as much bigger spaces are," she explains.
“Using white allowed me to lighten up small interior spaces and at the same time respect the original colors of the carpentry and stucco work,” Rocha says. East-facing windows also catch the warm morning sun and minimize the need for artificial lighting.
“Using white allowed me to lighten up small interior spaces and at the same time respect the original colors of the carpentry and stucco work,” Rocha says. East-facing windows also catch the warm morning sun and minimize the need for artificial lighting.
The open wardrobe is simply a bench with a single rod traversing the bedroom.
The open wardrobe is simply a bench with a single rod traversing the bedroom.
Imai House by Katsutoshi Sasaki + Associates

Sasaki realized that with limited floor space, he couldn’t be bound by assigned roles for each room. He concentrated on airy, open, and overlapping environments.

Photo provided by Katsutoshi Sasaki + Associates
Imai House by Katsutoshi Sasaki + Associates Sasaki realized that with limited floor space, he couldn’t be bound by assigned roles for each room. He concentrated on airy, open, and overlapping environments. Photo provided by Katsutoshi Sasaki + Associates
The kitchen was originally long, narrow, and completely closed off from the rest of the apartment. Miller opened up the plan to create a more spacious feel.
The kitchen was originally long, narrow, and completely closed off from the rest of the apartment. Miller opened up the plan to create a more spacious feel.