Collection by Allie Weiss

This is What Design Looked Like in Israel in 1965

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The Israel Museum, Jerusalem celebrates its 50-year anniversary in 2015. To commemorate its history, the museum is hosting an exhibition that looks back at what its founding year, 1965, meant not only for the institution, but for the country's visual culture as a whole. We spoke with museum director James S. Snyder about the pivotal year.

"In 1965, Israel was barely 17 years old," Snyder says.
Designed by Russian-born architect Al Mansfeld, the museum is located atop Neveh Sha’anan, the Hill of Tranquility, in...
Each module is constructed of form-cast concrete clad with Jerusalem stone, and features clerestory windows that...
The museum’s Upper Entrance Hall was built with four modules, and features a dramatic glass curtain wall.
The Shrine of the Book is a wing of the museum that houses the Dead Sea Scrolls, the oldest biblical manuscripts in the...
"Israel at the time was geographically isolated—there was no CNN, no international cell phone communication, no...
"In 1965, Israel, like the U.S., was looking to Europe and, in particular to Scandinavia for design inspirations to...
"The Safsalit was invented by a Jewish immigrant from Romania named Moshe Pitaro, who worked as an upholsterer," says...
An advertisement from 1965 promotes the new museum.
Pictured is "Staccato" by Yaacov Agam, an Israeli artist who became a leading figure in the op art movement.
The exhibition, on view from March 31 through August 29, 2015, will feature a range of objects, from furniture and home...
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