Collection by Luke Hopping

Modern Renovations for 1940s Homes

These Greatest Generation–era houses were worn out by the time their current occupants arrived, prompting some serious reboots.

Finding a home in the Cincinnati suburb of Wyoming was easy for this well-traveled family. The tricky part was reimagining and renovating the space to match their desired aesthetic. But, after four years, the house was transformed into the family’s modern oasis.
Finding a home in the Cincinnati suburb of Wyoming was easy for this well-traveled family. The tricky part was reimagining and renovating the space to match their desired aesthetic. But, after four years, the house was transformed into the family’s modern oasis.
Carle revived the home’s exterior by recladding it in fresh cedar planks, local stone, and black anodized aluminum. He also replaced the original windows — all damaged — and changed the sizes of some to respond better to the outdoors.
Carle revived the home’s exterior by recladding it in fresh cedar planks, local stone, and black anodized aluminum. He also replaced the original windows — all damaged — and changed the sizes of some to respond better to the outdoors.
The panoply of tile continues in the living room, which is anchored by a second fireplace that Karen wrapped in oval Heath tile. The architects tactically preserved the home’s most worthwhile features and modernized the rest, such as the vinyl windows they replaced with natural milled aluminum.
The panoply of tile continues in the living room, which is anchored by a second fireplace that Karen wrapped in oval Heath tile. The architects tactically preserved the home’s most worthwhile features and modernized the rest, such as the vinyl windows they replaced with natural milled aluminum.
In the Pacific Heights neighborhood of San Francisco interior designer Nicole Hollis successfully renovates this 1940s home. The kitchen opens up to the dining room, where Hollis played with size and shape. She designed the solid French oak dining table and bench, which were fabricated by B Serota Furniture and Architectural Design, and flanked the table with a Host and Hostess chair from Coup d'Etat San Francisco. Photo by: Ben Mayorga Photography
In the Pacific Heights neighborhood of San Francisco interior designer Nicole Hollis successfully renovates this 1940s home. The kitchen opens up to the dining room, where Hollis played with size and shape. She designed the solid French oak dining table and bench, which were fabricated by B Serota Furniture and Architectural Design, and flanked the table with a Host and Hostess chair from Coup d'Etat San Francisco. Photo by: Ben Mayorga Photography
Stephen Waddell and Isabel Kunigk worked with architect D’Arcy Jones to breathe new life into their “dank old” structure. The couple chose to sacrifice square footage inside in order to make the most of outdoor space.
Stephen Waddell and Isabel Kunigk worked with architect D’Arcy Jones to breathe new life into their “dank old” structure. The couple chose to sacrifice square footage inside in order to make the most of outdoor space.
Out back, the paved patio serves as the family's main dining room. Though occasionally snow and cold keep them inside, family dinners can often be enjoyed outdoors.
Out back, the paved patio serves as the family's main dining room. Though occasionally snow and cold keep them inside, family dinners can often be enjoyed outdoors.