Tom Price's Meltdown Chair

By Diana Budds / Published by Dwell
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While perusing the blogosphere today, I clicked my way to this demystifying video on British designer Tom Price's Meltdown chair. Price is a practitioner of the common-materials-cum-high-design camp (think the Campana Brothers and Kwangho Lee) and in his Meltdown series, which began in 2008, he's taken scorching heat to swaths of polypropylene sheets, piles of fleece jackets, skeins of plastic rope, and yards of PVC hoses. Though his work is well known by now, his production methods were still a mystery to me. It all started when he thought about a rather simple act: singeing the end of a rope to prevent it from fraying. In this video, Price talks about how the design process starts (would you have guesed that he starts by wrapping rope around a beach ball?), the mid-century design icon that provides the form of the heated mold that deliquesces the seat, and why he's happy to sit in the grey area between design and art.

Diana Budds

@dianabudds

A New York-based writer, Diana studied art history and environmental policy at UC Davis. Before rising to Senior Editor at Dwell—where she helped craft product coverage, features, and more—Diana worked in the Architecture and Design departments at MoMA and the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art. She counts finishing a 5K as one of her greatest accomplishments, gets excited about any travel involving trains, and her favorite magazine section is Rewind. Learn more about Diana at: http://dianabudds.com

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