An Architect Couple’s Family Home Connects Two Historic Buildings in the Czech Republic

An Architect Couple’s Family Home Connects Two Historic Buildings in the Czech Republic

In the picturesque South Bohemia region, architects Jiří Weinzettl and Barbora Weinzettlová of Atelier 111 Architekti shape their own stone- and spruce-clad residence from two traditional, neighboring structures.

On a winding and narrow street in a historic area of Trhové Sviny, a sleepy town in the Czech Republic’s South Bohemia region, architects Jiří Weinzettl and Barbora Weinzettlová of Atelier 111 Architekti renovated two homes—once separate, now adjoining—to create their own family dwelling that respects the original heritage and distinctive character of each structure. 

Jiří, the founder of Prague- and South Bohemia–based Atelier 111 Architekti, and Barbora, who works as a lead architect at the firm, were drawn to the site’s ideal location within walking distance from the central town square, while also hidden from the bustle of surrounding traffic.

The duo embraced the opportunity to create an alternative to new buildings in the area that feel disconnected from the local architecture and "sometimes disproportionately cut out of the landscape," say the architects. The 3,412-square-foot Kozina House connects two neighboring structures—one that underwent a significant renovation more than two decades ago, and another that had fallen into disrepair—and strips away incongruous elements, such as a large dormer balcony and plastic windows.

For the renovation, Jiří and Barbora contemplated each decision carefully with respect to the shape, scale, and materiality of the original buildings. Peeling back layers of brick, the architects discovered original stone masonry, which they preserved and coated in crisp-white paint to balance a contemporary aesthetic with the valued historic details.

Between the beaver tail roof tile and reconstructed shape, the home’s quiet exterior is sensitive to the streetscape—but once inside, its historic features are accompanied by a decidedly modern layer. Midcentury-inspired fixtures and furnishings, cement and oak floors, a muted color palette, and a steel staircase are among the updated details that round out the home. Newly inserted windows are conspicuously minimal and clean in clear contrast with the traditional dividing lines of the original openings. The mix of vaulted and curvaceous ceilings are clad in spruce boards.

Rather than build to the edge of the property, the architects left space for an adjoining terrace and a blossoming garden planted with fruit trees. 

The remaining program includes an attic with children’s rooms and a playroom, a principal bedroom with an en suite bathroom, two garage spaces, and a large, stand-alone workshop.


Related Reading:

A 19th-Century Barn Is Revived as a Cozy Mountain Retreat in the Czech Republic

A Cabin Made of Hempcrete Rises in a Remote Corner of the Czech Republic

Project Credits: 

Architect of Record: Atelier 111 Architekti 

Builder/General Contractor: Jiří Weinzettl

Civil Engineer: Atelier 111 Architekti

Lighting Design: Atelier 111 Architekti 

Interior Design: Atelier 111 Architekti

Cabinetry Design/Installation: Homer Concept & Interiors / @homerinteriors

Windows: Janošík Okna-Dveře / @janosik_okna_dvere

Published

Last Updated

Save

Get the Renovations Newsletter

From warehouse conversions to rehabbed midcentury gems, to expert advice and budget breakdowns, the renovation newsletter serves up the inspiration you need to tackle your next project.