The Biggest Frank Lloyd Wright Headlines of 2019
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The Biggest Frank Lloyd Wright Headlines of 2019

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By Lauren Conklin
This year, we reported on everything from demolition, to preservation, to rare Frank Lloyd Wright homes hitting the market.

With a career span of more than 70 years, Frank Lloyd Wright designed and built more than 500 structures across the U.S.—and influenced countless others through the mentorship of his prodigies. From real estate news, to restorations, and even demolitions, it comes as no surprise that changes to Frank Lloyd Wright–designed buildings make headlines. Luckily, Dwell keeps you in the know with the top Frank Lloyd Wright news stories of the year.

10. A Handsome, Hexagonal Home by Frank Lloyd Wright Wants $1.2M

About an hour’s drive from New York City, the Stuart Richardson House is a Usonian treasure with a hexagonal motif. As with most of Wright’s Usonian designs, there are floor-to-ceiling windows to allow for natural light. The living room’s 14 French doors open to a patio for indoor/outdoor living.

Completed in 1938, Frank Lloyd Wright’s Fallingwater is as relevant as ever—and a model of architectural conservancy. We tour the home and spend the night in his nearby Mäntylä to learn what you can’t experience through photos alone.

After narrowly escaping demolition in the 1990s, Frank Lloyd Wright's Thaxton House has been respectfully restored and updated—and it just returned to the market for $2,850,000. The house is one of only three Wright-designed homes in Texas, and it's the sole Wright residence in Houston.

In 1926, Lloyd Wright, son of famed architect Frank Lloyd Wright, completed a 5,600-square-foot Mayan Revival house in Hollywood for John and Ruth Sowden, an artistic couple with a flair for the theatrical. It would be, according to the New York Times, "a bohemian playhouse for aspiring actors and Hollywood bons vivants."

The Currier Museum of Art in Manchester, New Hampshire—which features works by the likes of Monet, Picasso, and O’Keefe—just added Frank Lloyd Wright’s Toufic H. Kalil House to its collection. The home is one of seven Usonian Automatic homes in existence, and now it will be preserved ad infinitum thanks to an anonymous donor.

Chicago–based Eifler & Associates Architects leads a painstaking renovation of the rarely published home located in Barrington Hills, Illinois—overseeing everything from a sagging roof to a Wright-designed dining room table.

Offered at $850,000 the 1955 Toufic H. Kalil House in Manchester, New Hampshire, is one of only seven Usonian Automatics ever constructed. Held in the family for almost 40 years, it hit the market for the first time this October.

The "endangered" Booth Cottage could be the first Frank Lloyd Wright-designed home to be torn down in the U.S. in over a decade.

Usonian homes were Frank Lloyd Wright’s solution for middle-class, affordable housing in America that he started designing in the 1930s. Designed in 1955 for the Pappas family—the original and only owners to date, the historically registered home is one of only two Wright-designed buildings in all of St. Louis.

Fifty miles north of New York City, a private island with a controversial home and guesthouse built from Frank Lloyd Wright’s drawings seeks a new buyer.

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