'Design through the Ages' Kicks off City Modern

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By Sara Dierck / Published by Dwell
City Modern—Dwell and New York Magazine's collaborative week-long collection of talks, studio and home tours showcasing New York architecture and design—began Monday evening with the opening of Design Through the Ages. Four interior designers: Nate Berkus, Francis D'Haene, Thom Filicia, and Ghislaine Vinas each explore a distinct era of time. The designers hand-picked pieces from showrooms at the New York Design Center, who also hosts the exhibition.

"What better way to show that the heritage of great design comes with us through the ages?" Dwell president Michela O'Connor Abrams asked the packed room. "When we really focus on great design, we know how to make it appropriate for this century and how to pull the pieces and the elements together."

Design Through the Ages is on view October 2-5 from 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. at the New York Design Center, 200 Lexington Avenue, 15th Floor, New York, NY and is free to the public.

Designer Ghislaine Vinas with her 1960s inspired selections. Graphic wallpaper by Flavor Paper.<br><br>How does one balance so many bright colors when they’re decorating a room? "I always say this: getting a white base—and I mean a really white base, not cream or beige—is really important for contemporary interiors," Vinas says. "In this case we have a really graphic black and white and it’s like painting really. You have to balance out the colors. It’s all about composition and getting the colors right."

Designer Ghislaine Vinas with her 1960s inspired selections. Graphic wallpaper by Flavor Paper.

How does one balance so many bright colors when they’re decorating a room? "I always say this: getting a white base—and I mean a really white base, not cream or beige—is really important for contemporary interiors," Vinas says. "In this case we have a really graphic black and white and it’s like painting really. You have to balance out the colors. It’s all about composition and getting the colors right."

"If you look at the 60s it’s all about a really graphic black and white and these pops of color," Vinas says.

"If you look at the 60s it’s all about a really graphic black and white and these pops of color," Vinas says.