Grab One of William Turnbull’s Binker Barns in the Sea Ranch For $1.33M
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Grab One of William Turnbull’s Binker Barns in the Sea Ranch For $1.33M

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By Kathryn M.
Nestled on a wooded bluff along the Pacific Coast in California, two classic Sea Ranch structures are connected by a catwalk.

About two-and-a-half hours north of San Francisco on a 10-mile stretch of California’s famous Highway One lies the Sea Ranch. This cluster of modernist homes was first conceived in the 1960s by a group of architects who envisioned an idyllic community among the rocky Northern California coast. One such architect, William "Bill" Turnbull, Jr., designed many of the area’s homes, including 17 called Binker Barns, one of which just hit the market.

A drive through the redwood forest leads to the home’s entrance. The home sits on 1.6 acres with permanently protected forest and ocean views.

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Turnbull was a key figure in the establishment of the aesthetic known today as the Sea Ranch architectural style. His designs helped to set the moody tone for which the area’s homes are known—generally, structures with sloping roofs, wood cladding, and finishes that adhere to strict guidelines for minimizing impact on nature. Overlooking rocky cliffs and the Pacific Ocean, each of the homes are nestled among rolling hills and timber forests.

A view of the Baker House and its classic Sea Ranch design. With sloping rooflines and a naturally aged wood exterior, the minimalist aesthetic is meant to blend with nature. 

The Binker Barns were designed to resemble their namesake in a classic post-and-beam style with exposed framing and meticulous joinery. Known as the Baker House, this 1968 Blinker Barn is the only home in Sea Ranch that’s listed on the National Register of Historic Places. The 2,500-square-foot home has been meticulously maintained, with some recent modernizations in the kitchen and bathrooms. Scroll ahead to take a look at the masterfully crafted redwood interior.

A look at the living and dining room, with barn-style doors and openings. Shown here, the original 1968 redwood interior was completed by master craftsman Matthew Silvia.

The dining space flows into a kitchen. Planks of wood continue to dominate the space, with redwood along the ceiling and walls, and Douglas fir along the floors.

The galley-style kitchen was modernized in 2011 with the addition of new Douglas fir custom cabinetry and Viking appliances. The kitchen countertops stretch along the wall, drawing the eye out sliding glass doors. 

The barn aesthetic becomes clearer along the perimeter of the interior. Criss-crossing beams and metal bolts are exposed, alongside structural timber beams overhead.

Divided into two structures, the 1968 main house features three bedrooms and two bathrooms, spread out across a three-storied lofted interior. A two-story detached addition was built in 2010 and connects to the main house via a catwalk, offering space for an office, library, and media center. A detached two-car garage also sits on the wooded property.

One of the upstairs lofts provides a cozy seating area and ocean views through the treetops. Walls of windows wrap around the space, warming the nook with natural light. 

Multiple lofts are playfully linked by catwalks that stretch from the northern to the southern end of the home. Yet another loft area is stacked high above, accessible only by a ladder.

A birds-eye view of the multiple loft areas. Simple, exposed conduit lighting runs along the steeply pitched roof, creating a warm glow against the redwood.

The property also features lushly landscaped areas with paths for walking through the enchanted setting. The two-car garage is designed in the same Sea Ranch style.  

In 2010, an addition was added onto the rear of the home, accessible via a catwalk that appears to float among the redwood trees. A hot tub rounds out the options for relaxing and entertaining in this lush oasis.

An architectural rendering by Al Forster shows the original 1968 structure, connected via a catwalk to the 2010 addition. 

Editor's note: This article previously referred to the home as the "Abell House," which was submitted as the preferred property name on the National Register of Historic Places Registration Form. However, the final registration lists the property as the "Baker House," after its original owners.

35292 Timber Ridge Rd is currently listed for $1,325,000 by Hanne Liisberg & Co.

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