Prefab homes have always been a part of the Dwell DNA. Here you will find prefab homes published in dwell magazine as well as great prefab home ideas. Prefabricated means either panelized, modular, or kit homes. Prefab architecture works for both remote sites and dense urban spaces. Modular homes are popular but can be the most expensive to customize. It is best to change as little as possible when buying prefab. Possible advantages of pre fab include lower cost, higher degree of precision, and less construction waste.

The house’s small square footage also necessitated that the bathroom do double duty as the laundry room.
“The upper floor includes the entry, cloakroom, guest bathroom, kitchen, dining room, living room, and terrace,” Hammer says. “In contrast to the lower floor and its separated rooms, the living area is composed as an open space with no walls.” Nerd Chairs by David Geckeler for Muuto surround a handcrafted nutwood table in the dining room.
“All interior walls were removed to create four individual rooms on the sixth floor,” Hammer says. The two children and the new baby share a bathroom. And in their bedrooms, storage continues to be key.
In the living area, a sliding door conceals the loft from the hallway leading to the office, thus opening the space up by revealing extra square footage in the bedroom. When it’s time for bed, the door slides shut for privacy.
“Perhaps the most recurrent request from the client was to create as much storage space as possible, which they desperately lacked in the original apartment,” Hammer says. The kitchen’s medium-density fibreboard cabinets provide plenty of room to keep things tidy. Tom Dixon bar lamps hang over the island.
Dunbar and Astrakhan's low-cost, high-impact tour de force is a storefront facade constructed from salvaged double-insulated window glass panels arranged in a shingle pattern.
Low-maintenance, sustainable materials were favored throughout the house. Striking orange Pirelli studded rubber floors were chosen for the main bathroom. Clean white fixtures and black shower cladding complete the graphic space.
A former 

closet was transformed into a double-height library, complete with a reading nook and a rolling ladder from Spiral 

Stairs of America. “That’s my 

favorite part of the house,” says Dan. 

“When I see Stella reaching for a book, 

there’s nothing better.”
The structure, which consists of prefabricated panels, can be assembled on-site without any tools. A photovoltaic system can be attached.
The modular units can be combined to form larger structures. The houses can be flat-packed and produced in large volumes, ideal for global shipping needs.
The custom shoe cabinets at the top of the stairs double as a balustrade.
In an 850-square-foot loft in Montreal, Quebec–based firm Gepetto built understated, custom cabinetry to suit an aging couple's needs. Here, the Murphy bed that folds into a larger walnut storage unit. The wall, which also conceals a washer and dryer, does double duty as a partition between the bedroom and the loft’s entrance. Modern Murphy beds like this one often incorporate sleek lines constructed in dark-toned woods.
A floor-to-ceiling wall unit accommodates a fridge, stove, oven, and convertible custom cabinetry. The pendant light is from the Multi Luminaire showroom in Pointe Claire, Quebec; the appliances are from Bosch and Miele.
The 1,000-square-foot pavilion was completed in 2009 as a volunteer structure and tool shed--though today its used far more by the public than initially anticipated. "The garden was wiped out after the storm," McKay recalls. "There was nothing, zero. Volunteers came in and replanted everything." Photo by Frank Doering.
Double Jointed

In the downstairs bathroom, John chose a “potwasher” fixture by Encore that’s often used in restaurant kitchens. Its double-jointed arm lets it reach every corner of the custom Corian sink, where all five family members wash up—sometimes at the same time.

componenthardware.com
At nearly 80,000 square feet, the Oslo International School is one of Jarmund/Vigsnæs’s larger projects. Situated just outside Oslo, the school was recently renovated, with some 40,000 square feet of new construction. The colored panels suggest a sunny optimism, something the architects hoped to imbue in an educational context.
Both sets of panels slide open for maximum views and solar gain; in inclement weather, they shutter completely, while clerestory windows bathe the space in light.
Motorized skylights by Velux, 14 in all, welcome natural light into the house.
The home’s double-skin structure makes the most of Tasmania’s variable climate.
During the 2004 renovation the Wilsons replaced the plywood siding with cedar, and used reclaimed brick to maintain the home’s classic appearance.